Would it be possible to grind up coffee beans so finely that it dissolves in water like matcha does? Could this be a possible alternati

Would it be possible to grind up coffee beans so finely that it dissolves in water like matcha does? Could this be a possible alternative to instant coffee?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “how to grind up coffee beans

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  1. That’s exactly what I sell on Amazon, organic powdered coffee in packets, instead of instant. Well, micro-powdered to be exact.
    How did you think Turkish coffee was made? It’s just a super finely ground coffee bean that dissolves in water.
    Espresso machines use a little less ground coffee beans, and water goes “through” the grind, using high pressure.
    Drip or brewing equipments use beans that are a little less ground that espresso, and water passes through that as well.
    Instant coffee is mostly “freeze-dried”, crystal-like powder, that dissolves when mixed.

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  2. Would it be possible to grind up coffee beans so finely that it dissolves in water like matcha does? Could this be a possible alternative to instant coffee?
    Sort of. Starbuck’s answer to instant coffee, called VIA, uses what the company calls “microground” roasted coffee beans along with a dried, soluble coffee extract similar to that found in conventional instant coffees. The company claims that this combination produces a product that is very close to the flavor of its brewed coffees.
    But the microground coffee doesn’t really fully dissolve. It is just very finely dispersed such that it appears to dissolve to form a beverage that looks very much like brewed coffee, though a slight residue may settle out in the bottom of the cup.
    As a coffee addict…ah, I mean lover, I have blind tasted VIA against brewed coffee and freeze-dried instant coffee (along with the now harder to find coffee bags). VIA comes very close to tasting like brewed coffee and much more so than the freeze-dried instant. While it hasn’t replaced my brewed coffee at home, it is my morning beverage of choice on backpacking and camping trips, replacing the coffee bags I used to carry (those bags, by the way, contain a mixture of ordinary ground coffee and instant coffee). VIA is pricey compared to ordinary instant, but the quality of the brew is worth it in my opinion, if you need an instant product.

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  3. Matcha is usually made with a very small amount of water to produce a thick enough slurry to suspend the ground tea leaves. The same could be done with finely ground coffee. I can get a very fine grind of coffee in a coffee grinder with a spinning blade if I shake it while grinding. It makes a coffee powder.
    Optionally, by adding finely ground chia seeds to the coffee powder & hot water mix, it will thicken enough to keep the coffee powder suspended.
    I make a Bulletproof style mix using hot water, coconut milk, coconut cream powder, cinnamon, organic raw ground cacao, organic coffee powder, ghee, coconut oil, and ground chia seeds. I heat this up in a small pot on a stove. A meal can be made from this by adding a pasture raised beaten egg and some dried coconut flakes. Whip it up with a small whip.
    Another question related to this is: If matcha is green (unprocessed) tea leaves, could a similar beverage be made with green unroasted coffee beans??

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  4. The closest coffee will ever get to matcha tea is Turkish coffee, which uses a burr grinding method similar to a pepper grinder:

    Would it be possible to grind up coffee beans so finely that it dissolves in water like matcha does? Could this be a possible alternati

    You are essentially putting the coffee grinds with the water and boiling it in a copper pot called an ibrik, either using a flame lit burner or directly on a stove, and pouring it directly into the drinking glass, similar to how matcha would be served in a cup but without a whisk.
    High end burr grinders are capable of achieving similar grinds, though a hand grinder may possibly be easier to use because at that grind size it starts to clump up and not move through the mechanism as easily.
    I suppose the real question is whether or not you could eliminate the “sludge,” and as result of coffee being an oily product you would still have sediment. Tea tends to reabsorb water and remain suspended, though the whisk is used for a reason.

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