Why is sugar soluble in water?

Why is sugar soluble in water?

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  1. Sugar (Sucrose) is a polar molecular solid. The presence of O-H groups in the structure of sugar allow these molecules to interact with polar water molecules through hydrogen bonding resulting in high solubility of the compound.

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  2. Water is a polar liquid. Now, what is chemical polarity? It is a separation of electric charges. The water molecule is polar, i.e., the oxygen is slightly negative, while the hydrogens are slightly positive due to the higher electronegativity of oxygen. For a solute to dissolve in water, the solute and solvent that is water, in this case, must attract one another. The bond between the oxygen and hydrogen atoms (O–H bond) in sugar (sucrose) gives the oxygen a slightly negative charge and the hydrogen a slight positive charge. Sugar is a polar molecule. The sugar gets dissolved in water because of the hydrogen bonding between them. But what is hydrogen bonding?!
    It is the electrostatic force of attraction between a hydrogen atom which is covalently bonded to a more electronegative atom or group, and another electronegative atom bearing a lone pair of electrons. In this case, water and sugar.

    Why is sugar soluble in water?

    Research credit:- Wikipedia, ScienceABC, Middleschoolchemistry
    Image credit:- ScienceABC

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  3. Sugar dissolves in water because both substances are polar substances. Water dissolves the majority of substances that are polar or ionic. The fact that sugar dissolves in water is unusual because most molecular compounds are nonpolar and are not water-soluble.
    Sugar is a molecular compound, which means it is comprised of covalent bonds by which the atoms in the molecule share their valence electrons. This is the opposite of ionic bonding, in which atoms donate or receive electrons and change their attractive charges individually. The type of bonding atoms undergo when they react together depends on the difference in their electronegativity values. If the difference is great, they exhibit ionic bonding. If there is no difference or only a slight difference, they form covalent bonds, with the covalent bonds becoming more polar as the difference becomes greater.
    In a polar covalent bond, the electrons are shared unevenly. This creates a slightly negatively charged end and a slightly positively charged end in a phenomenon known as a dipole shift. These ends allow for intermolecular interactions and give water its properties as a solvent. Polar bonds contribute to the overall polarity of the molecule, although it should be noted that not all molecules with polar bonds are completely polar.
    Key Concepts
    For a liquid to dissolve a solid, the molecules of the liquid and solid must attract one another.
    The bond between the oxygen and hydrogen atoms (O–H bond) in sugar (sucrose) gives the oxygen a slight negative charge and the hydrogen a slight positive charge. Sucrose is a polar molecule.
    The polar water molecules attract the negative and positive areas on the polar sucrose molecules which makes sucrose dissolve in water.
    A nonpolar substance like mineral oil does not dissolve a polar substance like sucrose.

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  4. Because it is more polar or it is ionic or only ionic compounds can dissolves in water.
    Or other answer
    Beacause in water there a small spaces between them so the sugar get trapped between the spaces and likely to observed as desolved.

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  5. Sugar has three OH groups on it, each of which can hydrogen bond to three water molecules. (the H can link to the O of a water molecule and the lone pairs on the O can each link to a H from two different waters. So, lots of strong intermolecular forces to water means it dissolves well in water.

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  6. The crystals of sugar break down into individual molecules which are too small to see. The fact that they are too small to see sets a maximum size on such molecules.

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  7. Yes. But there is, of course, a maximum amount of solute (in this case, sugar) that can be dissolved into a given amount of solvent (in this case, water) at a given temperature. By raising the temperature – you increase the maximum that can be dissolved. To learn how much is the maximum at room temperature – modify Tan Yong Han’s experiment by measuring the amount of sugar you add, and do so in small increments – when the sugar starts to “fall out” of the mix, you’ve hit the maximum solution level – if you’ve been measuring the sugar you added as you went, and measured the amount of water you used, you’ll know the maximum possible.
    In a real-life circumstance – this principle applies critically to the lives of all animals… sugar is critical to life; the sugar called glucose is the form our bodies run on, and it is dissolved into the water in our bloodstream to be carried throughout our system so it can be transferred into our body cells – ALL of which NEED it to fuel themselves. If sugar wasn’t water-soluble, life -as we know it – would not exist.

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  8. I would put the water in a glass and then take a spoon and use it to put the sugar in the water. After that I would stir the sugar/water solution until all the sugar is dissolved.

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  9. Because each molecule of dissolved sugar, is in a lower energetic state, than as refined and dry sugar crystals.
    Sugar is made in plant cells for the storage of energy derived from sunlight, converted to sugar as a form of storing chemical energy. Cells are (mostly) aqueous systems, and need to move their energy currency around after making it. So why not water soluble sugars?
    _______________
    Plants can and DO make fats also, but typically not so much as an energy storage system for their retrieval .. a few tree and other plant fruit exceptions come to mind. Almost always associated with seeds, where the fat and oil energy will be utilized by their progeny while sprouting.

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  10. Sugars have the hydroxy group (-OH), the same group found in water (H-O-H).
    Compounds with hydroxy groups, including sugars and alcohols, can form hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen bonding is the strongest type of intermolecular bonding, so compounds forming other, weaker types of intermolecular bonds cannot mix properly with water. Sugars form the same type of bonds water does so the two of them can bond properly together.

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  12. Sugar is soluble in water due to the hydroxl, or alcohol, groups.
    Solubility is heavily intertwined with polarity and dipole moments. Essentially, if the dipole moments of the solute and solvent are similar, the solute dissolve.
    Water is very polar. There is said to be a partial negative charge at the oxygen end and a partial positive charge at the hydrogen. This is due to oxygen’s electronegativity being higher than hydrogens. Thus, we would expect polar solutes to dissolve in water.
    Let us look at a simple cycloalkane before we look at sugar, say cyclohexane:

    Why is sugar soluble in water?

    The difference of electronegativity between hydrogen and carbon isn’t very high thus no significant partial charges are formed. As a result, cyclohexane is non-polar and doesn’t mix well with water.
    Now lets look at a sugar, say glucose:

    Why is sugar soluble in water?

    You can see it looks very similar. However, those alcohol groups (-OH) provide the necessary polarity for sugar to dissolve in water. Strip away all the alcohol groups and the solubility in water would dramatically reduce.
    As an extra note:
    The addition of polar groups to non-polar molecules is very crucial for modern medicine. For an example, take an antihistamine called fexofenadine:

    Why is sugar soluble in water?

    Notice how it has two alcohol groups and a carboxyl group. These polar groups prevent the molecule from crossing the blood-brain barrier. If these molecules were able to cross the blood-brain barrier, they would have a sedative side-effect.

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  13. Both being polar (although water is more polar) and solvent-solute attractions being more stable and stronger than solute-solute and solvent-solvent attractions,(because of the formation of more hydrogen bonds) the process is exothermic and hence spontaneous.

    Victor Allen’s

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  14. It does not actually dissolve as does NaCl which ionizes in solution into Na+ and Cl- ions.
    Hexose sugars such as glucose and fructose (C6H12O6) are polar molecules and able to interact with polar water molecules becoming suspended but still intact. Plasma proteins do the same thing in blood.

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  15. For a liquid to dissolve a solid, the molecules of the liquid and solid must attract one another. The bond between the oxygen and hydrogen atoms (O–H bond) in sugar (sucrose) gives the oxygen a slight negative charge and the hydrogen a slight positive charge. Sucrose is a polar molecule.The polar water molecules attract the negative and positive areas on the polar sucrose molecules which makes sucrose dissolve in water.

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  16. Because water is a solvent and sugar is a solute … a solvent in which the attraction force of molecules / ions is low. And solutes have higher attraction force of molecules / ions than water. Therefore sugar molecules / ions take the space of water molecules / ions. nd make a solution… this is why sugar dissolves in water

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  17. Yes, definitely sugar dissolves in to the water on mixing the two. Simple science behind this is that for a liquid to dissolve a solid, the molecules of the liquid and solid must attract one another.

    Why is sugar soluble in water?

    Sugar (Sucrose ) is Polar molecule (meaning it has a specific charge partial positive or negative) thus, water molecule attracts the negative and positive areas on the polar sucrose molecules which makes sucrose dissolve in water.

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  18. actually it is the other way around. It is water soluble because Life needs energy. Organic molecules can give you energy. Simple alkanes would give the most energy. But unfortunetely alkanes are not water soluble. Since most of living species are water based this is not an option. Therefore some extra hydroxyls are added that makes it water soluble but still can provide energy as well. (sugars are more polar and can form hydrogen bonds). Basically it is a balence between providing enough energy but in the same time be water soluble.

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  19. Yes ….. If water is hot 🔥 so Sugar can easily dissolve in Water 💦… And If Water is cold ,So Sugar can not easily dissolve in Water 💦 …
    FooD AnD VloGs by FiZa

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  20. Sugar contains hydroxyl groups , which when placed in water forms a very weak intermolecular H bonding with water( Mainly between ‘O ‘atom of water and ‘ H’ atom of hydroxyl group of sugar) thas whyit dissolves in water . By this way alcohol also dissolves in water , as alcohol also contain hydroxyl group.

    Eight O’Clock

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  21. Put a spoonful in the water and stir. If some vigorous stirring doesn’t dissolve it, try heating it up a bit. Solubility of solids in liquids generally increases with increasing temperature.

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