Why is iced latte called a latte when the milk is not steamed?

Why is iced latte called a latte when the milk is not steamed?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “how to froth milk for iced coffee

0 thoughts on “Why is iced latte called a latte when the milk is not steamed?”

  1. Because latte (Italian for milk) is pretty much just an espresso coffee with a relatively large amount of milk added in, the only reason you usually have the milk steamed at all is because adding cold milk to even a few espresso shots would lead to an unpleasantly lukewarm drink instead of a hot one, whereas with an iced drink everything is supposed to be (literally) ice cold, so adding cold milk to the hot espresso doesnt ruin anything, since you’ll be adding ice to properly chill it down anyway.

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  2. Latte does not necessarily mean “Steamed Milk + Coffee”.
    Latte translates to “Coffee Milk”, regardless of temperature. Although the milk is often frothed with an electric frother in order to achieve a comparable amount of froth and foam.
    Now, in practice all over the world, a Latte is steamed milk with espresso at an 8:1 Ratio. You will most likely only find an “Iced Latte” in the US.

    Why is iced latte called a latte when the milk is not steamed?

    I would never drink an “iced latte”, as it is way too sweet and the milk has an odd texture and mouthfeel to me when over ice. I have always hated milk over ice, though. I would rather have a cold brew or nitro coffee on a warm day.
    I personally think people who drink cold lattes should be escorted out of the caffe, but who I am to tell someone what to drink?

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  3. I think we struggle with the names for cafe drinks because Starbucks has appropriated / bastardised them.
    I don’t think it should be called a latte because a latte will get you 1 : 4 : 1 milk foam, steamed milk, espresso.
    An iced latte is just espresso and milk on ice, which is a lot simpler. You could also call it an iced Americano with milk. I get iced Americanos all the time and I refuse to have the wool pulled over my eyes and pay an extra $2 for something called an “iced latte” when it doesn’t require someone to steam the milk or make it special.

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  4. “latte” is Italian for the english word “milk”. So a latte is espresso + milk. A “latte” from a coffee house should be roughly a 3:1 ratio of milk to espresso. The milk is heated as a matter of achieving the right temperature,because otherwise the cold or room temperature milk makes your hot espresso tepid, and NOBODY wants t0 drink a big room temperature glass of flat milk flavored with coffee. Hot is more enjoyable. The froth is a byproduct of the fact that the espresso machine blows hot air into the milk cup to heat the milk and thus creates the bubbles. In the case of your question, if you’re making a cold drink by adding ice to it, why bother to steam the milk, which you just pulled out the refrigerator? The goal is to achieve a cold coffee drink that is 3 parts milk, one part espresso. Pouring the hot milk into the ice will just dilute your drink and make it taste bad.
    I’m a little ashamed this answer is so long.

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  5. Probably because “latte” is simply the Italian word for milk. Latte that has not been steamed is still latte, or, in English, milk.

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  6. In the history, “latte” was made from expresso and milk. Maybe people nowadays still call it “latte” because it consist of milk and expresso.

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