Why is coffee from Italy less acidic than what is found in the US?

Why is coffee from Italy less acidic than what is found in the US?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “is lavazza coffee low acid

0 thoughts on “Why is coffee from Italy less acidic than what is found in the US?”

  1. Is it? From the various coffees I have sampled from two of the major Italian producers, Illy and Lavaza, both in shops or restaurants where their coffee is used to make espresso and at home where I use a variety of preparation methods, I have not found this to be true. I have sampled coffees of a variety of blends and roasting levels from these Italian coffee producers and have not found them to have a different level of acid (pH) or different acidity of flavor (brightness, sourness, “zing”).

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  2. The acidity of coffee is not specifically a subjective opinion and has more to do with the selection of beans, the roast style and for what purpose it is blended.
    As an artisanal roaster, I select beans, roast and blend, based on how the coffee is to be made. For pour-over, the trend is to bright, floral & fruit notes. For a flat white cappuccino, we like additional acidity to cut through the alkalinity of the milk. Given that this is the most popular drink in my coffee house (and most others that I know of), this brightness is sought after.
    Italians are espresso drinkers for the most part and they drink it throughout the day as part ritual and part need to feed the caffeine fix. Given this, the blends tend to favour their taste for very full bodied & rich espresso, with relatively low brightness (acidity) and that when made into a cappuccino, tends to be somewhat flat.
    Outside of Italy, the third wave coffee revolution has different preferences, with the balance of acidity/sweetness dominating public taste.

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  3. With respect, the question, as written, does not make sense. Surely coffee from Italy is found in the US? And if so, the question is logically circular: it asks “Why is coffee found in the US [coffee from Italy] less acidic than coffee found in the US?”
    If what the questioner really means is “Why is coffee drunk in Italy less acidic than what is drunk in the US?”, it’s probably just a matter of taste. The last time I was in New York the coffee universally was virtually undrinkable, at least to my taste. Even in one of those authentic coffee houses in Little Italy, all steam and green wall tiles. It was bitter, thin, and burnt in flavour. But I’ve had poor coffee in Italy, too – from a locals’ bar in Venice’s Rialto market, where you’d think they served the best of the best. It was just not to my taste.
    For me, the best coffee is brewed at home, where I can control the variables. I did, though, find the coffee in Budapest pretty good on the whole.

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  4. Because Italians care about their coffee and make sure the machines are regularly cleared of lime (calcium.)
    What passes for ‘drinkable’ coffee in many establishments in the rest of the world shocks a tourist Italian. I’ve met Italians who only drank tea during their first trip abroad.

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