Why is a coffee cup defined as six ounces?

Why is a coffee cup defined as six ounces?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “ounces in cup of coffee

0 thoughts on “Why is a coffee cup defined as six ounces?”

  1. It isn’t. Maybe that’s a local usage where you are, but it’s not at all universal. In fact, it’s only measured in 6 oz cups in very few countries, mainly the USA.

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  2. Maybe one reason is that if it were more than 6oz, you wouldn’t be able to hold the cup and extend the pinkie finger.
    I’ma guessin’ that when the Brits were drinking tea, the common cup size was 6oz. It just carried over to coffee. I drink about 24oz of coffee in the morn and have coffee jitters for half of the day. Maybe I should switch to low caffeine.

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  3. A coffee, tea, or miscellaneous cup may be any size. In US recipes, the measuring cup is pretty rigidly defined as 8 fl oz (about 236 mL). However, coffee roasters, and coffee machine makers variously define the coffee cup as 5 fl oz, 150 mL, or 6 fl oz; not everybody uses the same definition. But most people use larger mugs for coffee (mine is a bit over 12 fl oz.

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  4. 6 oz is about the size of a cocktail, or a glass of wine. The original serving of Coca Cola was 6 oz years ago, in fact it came in 6-oz bottles. I think we’ve just gotten used to more of everything over the last 100 years.
    But Google had a different idea. The companies that make coffeemakers—coffeemaker makers—like to be able to advertise their machines will do 10 or 12 cups. That claim depends on small cups! That sounds good too!

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  5. The coffee cup has no specific definition, in general practice. If one reads the instructions on ground coffee packages as well as drip-style coffee makers the range is from 4 oz. to 6 oz.
    My personal mug holds 18+ oz.
    I’ve answered a similar question sometime back…there are a couple of “standard” coffee cups used by a couple of “coffee institutes” that do vary from each other.
    And—every coffee machine and every coffee container has this little codicil…”adjust to your…

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  6. It isn’t. A coffee cup is whatever size you want it to be, and in most of the rest of the world it would be in millilitres, not fluid ounces, if it had to be defined at all.
    Just for shits and giggles, the coffee cup I am currently drinking out of has a capacity of 300ml, but my first coffee of the day needs a bigger cup. One pint!

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  7. I’ve wondered this for a while and am not an expert, but I have a theory. My European coffee maker’s carafe is marked in both cups and demitasses. One “cup” is the equivalent of one & a half “demitasses,” A demitasse is defined as 60 to 90 ml’s which is 2 to 3 ounces. Since the demitasse is a range, the conversion to ounces would have to be imprecise. Using the larger number of ml’s (90) times the ratio of 1.5 ml to X number of ounces yields a cup of 5.56 ounces. I’m guessing some rounding and estimating went on and six ounces was accepted as a “cup.” And that is not what a USA measuring cup says a cup is! It is 8 ounces. But clearly coffee “cups” are not true USA “cups.”
    I’m looking forward to a definitive answer to this puzzling question! Anyone?

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  8. It just is. It has to be something. I have never read anything that states why. Most of the standard serving sizes are not realistic portions.
    I use an 8 oz mug but when I make coffee, I use 6 oz as the water measure to the grounds.
    Original question: Why is a cup of coffee 6 oz?

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  9. Why is a coffee cup defined as six ounces?
    It isn’t.
    1 fl oz = un espresso
    2 fl oz = double espresso (un caffe doppio in Italian)
    4 fl oz = demitasse (French for “half cup”)
    8 fl oz = 1 cup (un tasse, in French)
    6 fl oz is a teacup, not a coffee cup, but most of the automatic drip coffeemakers use it as their standard measure of capacity, probably because they can sell more coffeemakers labeled “twelve cup” than “nine cup” because it’s sounds bigger. Nevertheless, if you attempt to pour 96 fl oz (12*8) into any “12-cup coffee maker” I’ve ever owned, you will wind up with 72 fl oz of coffee in the carafe and a 24 fl oz puddle of water on the counter around the coffeemaker.

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  10. When I was a kid they were 5oz. (The 1980s)
    But to your question; the term cup has various measures depending upon company, product, and country.
    One Cup ? Eight Ounces | How Coffee Carafe Sizing Works

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  11. Coffee cups come in all sizes. I have had very few coffee cups that were 6 oz. I have had many that were 10–12 oz. Like I said, they come into all sizes. I don’t know of any common size of 6 oz. I know of many coffee cups in very beautiful china sets that are much closer to 8 oz.

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  12. Actually five ounces, which is the size of the traditional coffee/tea cup. So coffee carafes and brewers announce how many of these cups you can fill from a full carafe.

    For instance, my 4-cup drip brewer only fills two and a half mugs. But it will fill four traditional coffee cups.

    So as long as you know which cup they are referring to, no problem.

    Victor Allen’s

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