Why does coffee smell so great, but it doesn’t taste as good?

Why does coffee smell so great, but it doesn’t taste as good?

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  1. Most of the taste feelings are actually coming not from the tongue, but from the nose. Our tongue only feels four primary tastes: sweet, sour, salt and bitter. Unfortunately, most of the roasted coffee taste is bitter and a little sour (especially in “italian” style roasting), which is very unpleasant combination.

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  2. I also can not stand the taste of coffee, home or out anywhere, all the sugar and cream in the world can not make it taste good, is it my taste buds or what, but it is nasty

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  3. Almost everyone has the identical experience – the coffee smells far better than it tastes. It sounds like the coffee you are buying is too old, or not properly roasted. Based on my personal experience, this is typical for 99.9% of all coffee sold in grocery stores and most coffee shops.
    I live near Atlanta, GA and it is very difficult to find fresh roasted coffee. Many local roasters sell their coffee in grocery stores, but NONE of them show the date the coffee was roasted. Peet’s Coffee is the only national brand I found which shows the roasting date of their coffee.
    The flavor of roasted coffee beans improves for a few days after being roasted, and starts declining after seven days. I never buy coffee that is more than 7 days past the roast date. At fourteen days, the flavor loss slows, but most of it is GONE already. When I roast my own coffee, I generally consume it within seven days. If not, then I freeze the roasted coffee beans after 3–4 days, and store them in coffee storage bags with one-way valves.
    If you can get fresh roasted coffee, and the coffee still does not taste good, then you need to look at how you actually brew the coffee. Most people use an automatic coffee maker, but there is no guarantee that using it can make good coffee. Very few coffee makers get the water hot enough to extract the best flavor from the coffee beans. The Specialty Coffee Association of America has ALL the details on their web site: Specialty Coffee Association of America

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  4. Aldehydes are the most delicate and volatile aroma compounds that form part of the 800 Volatile Molecular Species that are created in the roasted coffee process (wine has about 150). These particular compounds give coffee its sweet, caramel, fruit/floral-like aromas, but they are readily lost due to dissipation when exposed to air.
    So when you open a jar of coffee, it is highly likely that it is these desirable and flavorsome Aldehydes and the equally volatile aroma “butter” compounds that you are smelling. Sadly, your coffee is made using all the compounds that remain and many times by baristas who do not know how to extract the ‘best of the rest’ from the ground coffee.
    Extracting ‘the god shot’ – perfect espresso coffee. [ https://espressocoffee.quora.com/Extracting-the-god-shot-perfect-espresso-coffee ]

    Coffee’s volatile aroma compounds are created in the roasting process where, at the right level of heat, the Maillard Reaction (MRx) occurs causing the amino acids and carbonyl/carbohydrates found naturally in the …

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  5. Your biggest problem with the way your coffee tastes may be the coffee you are buying. After roasting, the taste of coffee begins to change. Subtly at first and then more noticeably. If you can find a coffee roaster near you or find an on-line roaster who guarantees that the coffee is freshly roasted, you will notice a world of difference.
    Two other things to improve the taste of your coffee are to store it in an airtight container at room temperature. Never, ever put it in the refrigerator or freezer. Also, grind your coffee just before you brew it. Fifteen minutes can make a big difference in the way your coffee tastes.

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  6. It maybe the type of bean or roast that maybe affecting your taste . I sell customers all types of coffees. For example : A light roast coffee drinker sips a cup of Dark roast , to them it may taste like mud. Also ,a dark roast drinker sips a light roast ,it tastes like warm water .

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