Why does a coffee cup not measure a cup? My coffee maker is a 12-cup maker, but it holds much less than 12 measuring cups of water. Why

Why does a coffee cup not measure a cup? My coffee maker is a 12-cup maker, but it holds much less than 12 measuring cups of water. Why is that? What is the history behind this difference?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “coffee cups for coffee machine

0 thoughts on “Why does a coffee cup not measure a cup? My coffee maker is a 12-cup maker, but it holds much less than 12 measuring cups of water. Why”

  1. Old habits die hard. I can remember fouling up my first ever batch of pancakes because the recipe called for one cup of milk and I used a coffee cup from my mom’s dish rack. Breakfast was supposed to be a treat but my mom didn’t play along and asked me why they were so horrible. I told her I followed the recipe on the package and she noticed the china cup with milk residue and explained that when recipes say “1 cup” they mean a specific cup, which she showed me.
    I was seven. Haven’t made that mistake since but can see how it’s a problem six decades later.
    Your typical china coffee cup holds five ounces of coffee or tea. When you see an advert (or even package) that says “12 cup coffee maker” check the manufacturer’s website. It’s usually a sixty ounce capacity or 12 x 5 ounces. At the end of cofee makers I deal with (espresso machines) we deal with the capacity in ml because espresso beverages come in so many different sizes all we want to know is that the boiler and reservoir have sufficient capacity to our needs.
    Yeah, it’s annoying but I suppose their market research has show that if they show that “12 Cup” coffee maker as the actual measures people don’t know what 60 ounces equals and certainly won’t be attracted to “holds 7.5 cups” compared to the “12 Cup” version. It should really say “12 servings” and then list the capacity in fluid oz and ml.

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  2. Because a cup is different in different places. A cup in the US is 8 fluid ounces – an actual measuring cup, that is, not a coffee mug or a demitasse or a teacup. In Canada, a cup is 7.6 ounces. In Japan, it’s 6.7 ounces. In most of the world that uses the metric system for fluid volume measurement, it’s 8.45 ounces (250 ml).
    But the manufacturers of coffeemakers are apparently a law unto themselves and have determined that A Coffee Cup is 6 ounces. Unless they determine that it’s 5 ounces. Or rarely, 4.
    My guess is that cup size was determined by the carafe and/or reservoir size – and marketing to maximize sales. The manufacturer states in big, bold letters that they are selling a 12-cup coffee maker, while the one next to it is only provides 10 cups. What neither tells you, at least in big, bold letters, is that the capacity is the same for both and that only the size of the cup has changed.

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  3. Old style coffee cups were only 6 ounce sups or smaller. Today they are 12 ounce or larger. Just make and enjoy the coffee, don’t sweat the small stuff.

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  4. Because an espresso cup and a mug are both considered “cups” as unit, but the amount they could hold differ too much.
    That’s why we use standard metric, measure by ounces or mL. You should check out how much your coffee make can hold / make in volume not cups.

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