Why do Brazilians drink so much coffee?

Why do Brazilians drink so much coffee?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “a lot of coffee in brazil

0 thoughts on “Why do Brazilians drink so much coffee?”

  1. There are two main reasons. The first, and most obvious, is that coffee is quite cheap and the second is that it has become some kind of cultural habit.
    Coffee is, like tea, one of the few beverages you can freely share with your kids (yes, kids in Brazil start drinking coffee at a very early age and, despite what some people elsewhere believe, it does them no harm). In the distant past, rich people would have wine at the table, but slowly people understood that wine was not good for children and had it reserved for the adults. Coffee has no such problem. Kids usually have coffee mixed with milk 1:1 or 1:2 until they acquire the taste. From this we have got the phrase “café com leite” (coffee with milk) that we use in the same meaning as “n00b”. Someone who still drinks his coffee mixed with milk is obviously a kid among adults. To say that someone is “cafe com leite” is patronising and quite offensive.
    Even before caffeine was isolated, people could see that coffee kept them awake, so the beverage became known as the “workman’s liquor” because it supposedly “helped” you toil along the day. That’s why employees were always served plenty of coffee. Even today, any Brazilian office provides coffee for free and in large quantities, just as much as you want — though, of course, too frequent coffee breaks will raise eyebrows (of course). What I mean here is that drinking coffee is seen as a positive trait. People drink it early in the morning to wake up. They drink if after lunch to prevent a slumber (Brazilians don’t sleep a siesta and find it very odd that other peoples do). They drink it in the middle of the afternoon to keep them running until the workday is over and they drink a bit when they come home so that they still have some energy to do personal things in their free time. The only other drink that has a similar reputation in Brazil is the “erva mate” (known as yerba mate across the border, by our Spanish speaking neighbours). Mate is also very widespread in Brazil, but, unlike coffee, it is no consumed the same way all over the country. In the Brazilian deep south it is prepared green and hot ( chimarrão ), in the centre-west they makie of it a kind of soft drink ( tereré ) and in the rest of the country they prepare it ripe, hot and sweet ( chá mate, which means “mate tea”) .
    Coffee is also a very social beverage because even people who will not drink alcohol for religious reasons of health concerns will indulge in coffee (this same role is played by chimarrão in the deep South, afaik). As far as I know, only Mormons have restrictions on coffee (but apparently not on Coca-Cola or guaraná sodas which are even richer in caffeine).
    Because coffee is so cheap we like it strong. What we call “café fraco” (weak coffee) or “café aguado” (watered coffee) is still stronger than what I have seen Americans drink, but the average Brazilian coffee is not as strong as an Italian espresso .

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  2. If by “much” you mean many times a day, then it’s ok. As for the quantity, we drink way less than our American folks. Here we drink in mugs and small cups. There they drink in huge soda-like, Starbucks-style cups. They consume a very high quantity of caffeine. Much higher than us down here in SA.

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