Which one tastes better: filtered coffee or french press?

Which one tastes better: filtered coffee or french press?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “is french press coffee better than drip

0 thoughts on “Which one tastes better: filtered coffee or french press?”

  1. That is a very good question, one with a lot of different answers! here’s my take.
    First, I assume by “filtered” you mean drip coffee. This is what the majority of coffee makers are. They heat water, which expands through a tube and flows up and over the basked with the ground coffee in it. Then the water is sprayed over the grounds by a spray head, so it can cover all the coffee grounds, and into the pot. This can create a flavorful pot of coffee, as long as the water isn’t too hot. And in most machines, the boiling water cools slightly as it rises in the tube toward the spray head, and by the time it’s sprayed over the coffee it’s below boiling, usually no more than 200 degrees F (93 C). This is perfect.
    You do NOT want to boil coffee! Boiling can ruin the coffee by extracting bitter oils and flavor compounds that are normally not released at below-boiling temperatures.
    So what about a French press? With a French press, the water is heated externally in a kettle. The water is boiled in the kettle, then let it sit for 30–45 seconds to cool down to 200 degrees F or so. Then it is poured into the press where it mixes with the loose coffee. The loose coffee grounds float around in the hot water for 4–6 minutes until properly extracted, then the press pushes the grounds to the bottom of the pot where they are no longer brewing with the water, and the hot coffee poured off.
    So which is better? I like the French press. I think it makes a more flavorful cup of coffee. This is because the water is in contact with the coffee longer, which releases more flavors. With a French press, you control how long it brews. Like it a bit stronger? Let it sit for 6–8 minutes before pressing. Weaker? Press after 3–4 minutes. You can control it the temperature and brew time for the perfect cup. Drip machines tend to let the water run through the grounds too fast, and there isn’t time for a good extraction.
    But, as I said, there are many different opinions on this.

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  2. There is no “better.” Two different methods produce different results, depending on the beans you use.
    Why are you so concerned about “better?” Try both yourself and decide for yourself.

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  3. The short answer is: it depends. I have to assume when you say ‘filtered’ you mean filtered by paper. I’m assuming that because coffee made in a French press does indeed get filtered by the mesh metal screen on the plunger. If that’s what you mean, then please keep reading below.
    Coffee filtered through paper loses some of the essential oils that are generated when coffee is brewed. Depending upon your palette, you may or may not notice the difference. The biggest determiner in coffee taste is not the method of brewing, but the quality of ingredients. Regardless of method, always use the best quality beans you can afford, get them fresh, grind them properly just prior to brewing, use purified water (not distilled), and make sure your brewing equipment is as clean as possible. Do these things and your success is inevitable.

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  4. As others have said, it’s personal preference thing.
    My favorite is the clever dripper, which almost gives you the best of both. It’s a pourover dripper with a stopper on the bottom. You fill the door and let it steep, giving you the full extraction of a French press. Then you set it on your cup, opening the valve, and it passes though a filter to remove the mud.

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  5. Everyone’s ‘Taste’ is different, but I’ve always enjoyed the French Press method when I have some really excellent coffee beans that I can coursely grind and use Distilled water instead of Tap water.

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  6. I like French press or Moka Pot. Percolated next best. Drip coffee is my least favorite, but if you use enough grounds, even drip can be pleasant. I like the Vietnamese mini-pots that sit atop a cup, not least for brewing Trung Nguyen.

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  7. I would have to say neither! Both methods do not offer any method of control which will give consistency and precise results in the coffee. The best method is the Hario V 60 pour over method which will give the best tasting coffee-period !!

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  8. People who have acquired the taste of filtered coffee often prefer it. But throughout Europe people prefer French pressed light coffee.

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  9. French press generally offers a more full bodied coffee with a higher oil cpncentraion, whilst filter provides a clean cup, emphasising acidity. I like to think of them like white wine and red wine: I like both! But I prefer white wine in summer 😉

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  10. Which is better, a French press or coffee maker?
    I personally prefer a french press, but there are valid reasons to use either. It’s purely a matter of taste and convenience.
    I rarely need the volume that a typical coffee maker produces, so the smaller volume french press is more convenient, and I actually prefer to let my coffee steep for longer than a typical drip coffee maker allows. I also don’t need to buy filters for the press as it has a washable stainless-steel filter.
    It’s not really a question of one being better than the other, they simply produce different results and it’s up to you to decide which you prefer. If you prefer a quick drip coffee and/or the larger volume then a standard coffee maker is going to be a better choice for you.

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