Where did the saying “wake up and smell the roses” come from?

Where did the saying “wake up and smell the roses” come from?

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  1. ‘ Wake Up And Smell The Roses ‘ = In keeping with a very philosophical turn of things, this phrase means to take the time out from your busy life that is overshadowed by commitments and responsibilities and stop to appreciate the beauty of life or the things that matter most in life.

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  2. At least one origin of a related phrase, and perhaps the original phrase “wake up and smell the coffee” was used as a retort by Ann Landers and her sister “Dear Abby” (Abigail Van Buren) two twin sisters with gossip and advice columns back in the period of 1956 onward).
    “Smell the roses” was not used in that other particular phrase – it was used in phrases such as “don’t forget to smell the roses”

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  3. I don’t think “Wake up and smell the roses” is an expression. It’s a combination of “Wake up and smell the coffee” and “Stop and smell the roses.”
    And Mac Davis did not originate “Stop and smell the roses.” He just popularized it. Just as Joe South popularized, but did not originate, the expression, “I never promised you a rose garden.” In fact, the song only tangentially even use the expression the way it was used in the original source book.
    This is the best answer I’ve found for: Stop And Smell The Roses…

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  4. This is a mashup of two different phrases: wake up and smell the coffee and stop and smell the roses . The first phrase seems to have originated with Ann Landers, and the second appears to have originated with a country music singer, Mac Davis.

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  5. it is a merging of two idioms ‘wake up and smell the coffee,’ and ‘stop and smell the roses. I think are about enjoying life. One about waking up and smelling fresh brewed coffee is appealing and the other means to slow down and enjoy the beauty of life.

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  6. “Wake up and smell the roses” is most likely a conflation of two other sayings: “wake up and smell the coffee” and “stop and smell the roses”.
    According to the OED, “wake up and smell the coffee” had appeared in print at least as early as 1943 in the Chicago Tribune.
    A few years back, when a wife told her husband to ‘wake up and smell the coffee’, it usually was said in utter derision. Now, when there is coffee to smell, she shouts it to him in supreme delight.
    However, one enterprising philologist found the phrase used in a letter to the editor of the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) in 1927, so it was clearly in common usage even then. It became more commonly used after Ann Landers popularized it in her columns in the early 1950s.
    meaning and early instances of ‘to wake up and smell the coffee’

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