When a coffee shop often serves coffee that has an oily film on top, should the health department be contacted?

When a coffee shop often serves coffee that has an oily film on top, should the health department be contacted?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “why does my coffee look oily

0 thoughts on “When a coffee shop often serves coffee that has an oily film on top, should the health department be contacted?”

  1. No. It is not a health or food safety issue. Coffee beans have oil, and as they are roasted, oil comes to the surface. Oil on the surface of the grinds will be reelased into your coffee. A darker roast will have more oil.

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  2. Coffee beans contain two natural oils: cafestol and kahweol.
    It’s natural for coffee to have a foamy oily residue. Depending, presumably, on the preparation and freshness of beans.
    I would be more vigilant to check for soap in your coffee, that’s far more likely.
    In the meantime, be sure to check the health departments recent inspections of the coffee shop.
    But don’t worry, you ingest things on a regular basis you probably wouldn’t like and you’re still living. Worrying about minor contaminants is a waste of time.

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  3. No – that oil is natural. Coffee beans have oil in them. No not the kind you put in your car. Lots of foods have oil in them. Ever heard of peanut oil? Avocado oil? Corn oil?

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  4. I see oil on top of my coffee, from the beans. So, not sure how much, how thick an oil you are alluding to. In any case, calling the health department on them doesn’t quite seem warranted . Have you spoken to the owners/servers? Have you looked up oils/coffee beans online? Just seems like too far a reach, without more info. You just might look silly to the health officials.

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  5. You are clearly, tragically, unfamiliar with real coffee. Coffee has natural oils in the bean that are released by roasting. If only you had ever been served a cup of real coffee, you would know this.
    I may have a cup now. And it’s 3 a.m.!

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  6. You’d look rather silly if you did. Coffee beans contain natural oils and depending on the type of bean and the roast you can get a lot or little of “coffee scum” (the term I have seen most often used for this). So nothing wrong with it, though if it spoils your enjoyment ask for a different bean or blend.

    Victor Allen’s

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  7. When a coffee shop often serves coffee that often has an oily film on top, should the health department be contacted?
    Tell the manager/owner.

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  8. If it occurs a lot, it’s probable that the coffee equipment is not being cleaned out regularly. Coffee is naturally oily and can leave a residue, particularly on metal and plastic surfaces. The residue can also contain very fine particles of coffee, as well as the oils.
    As far as I’m aware, it won’t make anyone ill, but it does affect the taste of the coffee, particularly as oily substances like coffee residue can go stale.
    You might have a quiet word with the shop owner and suggest that the staff have a daily clean-out of the equipment with very hot water and a wipe with a paper towel. It will improve the taste of the coffee.

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  9. Depends. Oils actually carry the flavor of coffees. Also how are they brewing the coffee? If it’s a coffee pot with a paper filter I maybe slightly alarmed (that they aren’t changing the filter for new pots, unlikely since they are super cheap, but maybe lazy. Maybe).
    Lastly what sort of beans are they using? Coffee houses are notorious cheaps and darker the bean the more oil the coffee will have (you have sucked all the flavor out of the beans roasting it dark).
    Basically more info needed and coffee really isn’t a product that “can make you sick” fresh out of a pot.

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