What would happen if I gave a 6-month-old baby some coffee?

What would happen if I gave a 6-month-old baby some coffee?

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0 thoughts on “What would happen if I gave a 6-month-old baby some coffee?”

  1. My uncle was born in Soviet Union right after the WWII. Life was very difficult at that time, he was very unhealthy as a baby and the doctors said he would not survive. His father (my grandpa) decided, if my uncle is going to die anyway, then at least let him try something pleasurable like chocolate. He fed his baby son little pieces of chocolate, my uncle licked it from my grandpa’s finger. To my grandparents astonishment, my uncle began to feel better and better with each day his dad was giving him the chocolate, until he became healthy enough to survive. Looking back, I think the reason for his baby sickness was probably malnourishment, they did live through some difficult times. And the chocolate just gave him that extra nutrition needed for him to survive.

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  2. I can tell you what happened to my dad. Please understand, my dad was born in 1916. There was no formula and birth control was, “I’m nursing, can’t get pregnant.” Yes, you can. When dad was 6 months old grandma was pregnant with son number two.
    Dad wouldn’t tolerate cow milk and screamed with goat milk. She added some sugar and coffee and he was content.
    He drank coffee, morning noon and night and could fall asleep after having a fresh cup and could find coffee at 3 AM in a desert. He drank it black, black with sugar, with milk and with milk and sugar as well as decaf.
    He lived to be 84. If he hadn’t smoked, He’d have lived a lot longer.
    Kids used to be given, tea, soda and flavored sugar water in different colors.
    I’m really glad that’s changed.

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  3. If your 6 month old baby has drunk some coffee by accident, there is no need to call the doctor HOWEVER.. caffeine is an addictive drug, it dilates the capillaries, increasing blood flow, speeds up the metabolism and causes the heart to beat faster. You really don’t want to be doing any of these things to a baby, whose system is still developing. The physical experience for your child will be one of feeling jittery, agitated and uncomfortable in their skin. You will be disrupting the delicate balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system which affects how they meet life situations throughout life, increasing the possibility of anxiety. They have not yet developed the physical ability to disperse bio chemicals in the body so these symptoms will last much longer than they would in an adult. You will be putting strain on the baby’s liver and digestive tract, which has not developed the ability to process caffeine, you will be changing the microbial balance in the baby’s gut before it is fully established, which has an ongoing affect on their health and well-being. At 6 months old an infant is taking the vast majority of their nutrition from milk and is only just learning to digest gentle solids. If you are breastfeeding, you should also avoid coffee.

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  4. Actually, my mother used to give coffee to my little sister when she was cranky. It seems that coffee has the opposite effect in small children. The coffee always calmed my sister down. Mind you, we are only talking about a tablespoon, not a whole cup!
    This “treatment” for cranky babies came down through my ancestors, pre-WW1. My grandmother said she did it for my mother, and she’s almost 90 now, so apparently, no harm done!
    IMPORTANT: I am not recommending anyone to do this. I am not a doctor!

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  5. Why on God’s green earth would you want to??? You can’t give a baby a hot bath why would you want to give them coffee??? That could damage the lining of the baby’s stomach and your baby could be taken away because it would be a form of child abuse. Babies do not need caffeine in any amount because what they eat in the first two years establishes their digestive system. Caffeine is also addictive. It is irresponsible to say the least.

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  6. When my niece would visit, many years ago, we drank a lot of diet Coke. She also complained about her chest feeling funny on occasion.
    It wasn’t as clear cut as reading two sentences, but I eventually realized that the caffeine was giving her heart palpitations. We switched to caffeine free and the problem went away. She was also drinking diet Coke at her parent’s homes so I told them about what I found out.
    Your baby can’t complain. But I imagine the same thing might happen.
    My niece? Well she’s 25 now and a lawyer and in good health. No lasting affect.

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  7. Don’t give your baby caffeine. There are side effects that could harm the child. Now the chances of serious harm are low, but temporary behavior problems are guaranteed. As adults, we can manage the effects of caffeine. Babies don’t have the same capabilities. It’s best to keep the baby on the boobie sauce and non sugary juice until they are 5–6. My son, 5, gets maybe one soft drink a day. We certainly don’t give him coffee.

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  8. Why would you?
    caffeine will increase the baby’s heart rate which could cause cardiac arrest. No reason for a child that young to ever get coffee. I equate that to child abuse.

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  9. Not a good idea. The amount of caffeine is huge for a little one. Caffeine is a serious substance even for adults, I remember having coffee with crackers as young as 6 years old but I would not recommend coffee for young children as it will make them hyperactive and irritable.
    For a 6 months old, I would take her/him to the doctor right away.

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  10. Well, here’s a question with which I have some experience. My mother decided to give my 4 month old some coffee and chocolate cake “as a treat“ while I was sleeping. He was mostly breastfed at that time. I’m not sure how much he consumed, but it was enough to make him jittery and irritable. I have rarely been so angry in my life. I took him away from her and spent the rest of the day cuddling and nursing him in a darkened room to help him settle down.
    As far as I know, my baby didn’t suffer any lasting effects. But, why would anyone think that giving coffee and cake to an infant is a good thing?

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  11. There’s no reason to make your 6 month old newborn anxious and cause discomfort with possible cramping and diarrhea.
    I question your thoughts about Why you’d want to give a 6 month old infant Caffeine.
    Talk to a Neurologist about it, not Quora people who can give harmful information.

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  12. Infants have significantly higher heart rates than adults. Coffee increases heart rate while constricting blood vessels. This could elevate an infant’s heart rate to dangerous levels. It’s negligent and should certainly not be done.

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  13. They tell breastfeeding moms to limit their caffeine for a reason. And most push for nothing besides formula or breast milk until about 4–6 months anyways. Basically what I’m trying to say is at that age food and water is barely allowed why in the word would coffee be ok?

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  14. Caffiene is a stimulant drug, why would someone give this to an infant? The affects on an infant would be the same if not enhanced due to their weight and level of development (ie. heart racing, shaking, inability to sleep). whomever you are, please do not give infants anything other than age appropriate nutrition (6 months is breast milk or formula), not caffiene or alcohol!

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  15. Why on earth would you want to give a 6 mth old any coffee? Coffee has caffeine, yes, even decaf has some, be it minimal. A 6mth old doesn’t need coffee.

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  16. Let’s see first I hope you understand that preemies in NICU are often given caffeine to keep their BP up.
    Secondly my grandmother raised 5 children and many grandchildren occasionally giving a teaspoon of coffee to keep older infants from napping too late, so parents might get a few continuous hours of sleep at night. she is 96 we are all fine though we are coffee drinkers. I also am aware that the entire world is much too intent on deciding for others what should never be done in public, but more than likely does some of those very things themselves. I would also never condescend to tell my grandmother how to treat an infant. She has more experience in her little pinky than I have in my entire adult experience. She gave my son a teeny bit of filling from lemon meringue pie when he was 3 months old. The only side effect to this has been that my sons favourite pie, bar, candy, summer beverage, cookies and cake are all lemon. I find it hard to believe that people who have anxiety attacks over sniffles or think that a baby will expire if exposed to a little dirt can imagine that women who raised large families without specialized accessories for every function and had to actually doctor, nurse, fabricate for, and cook everything in their household and on their property had no idea what they were doing.

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  17. When I was pregnant, I went out to brunch and drank coffee, caffeinated coffee, and several cups of it. My baby started swimming from one side to the other inside me, back-and-forth repeatedly. You could see her little feet or elbows making the U-turn, seriously. I learned from the lesson: no more caffeine during pregnancy or breast-feeding. And my babies /toddlers did not have caffeine.

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  18. There is just not a reason to. Adults drink coffee a lot of times for a boost or jolt of energy & it speeds up your heart rate-babies don’t need that. Depending on the baby’s condition you could irritate heart issues as well. Generally just tasting it wouldn’t hurt a baby if they had it but I’d say avoid it.

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  19. NO! Sixth months old babies just still need the mothers milk. Zero caffeine! Their systems are still developing and this would be an overload to their system! I’m 58 and still can’t do coffee! Please do not give a baby coffee!

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  20. There are some neurological conditions treated by caffeine. I doubt it would be advised for a 6 month old in any case but my 7yo gets a latte every morning (turns out caffeine pills are huge and hard for a little kid to swallow). But his body processes caffeine differently – it bonds with an extra enzyme produced in his body, neutralizing it and leaving little caffeine available to make him hyper, etc. So if you’re asking for a medical reason, just go with what your doctor/neurologist suggests. Or if you’re concerned about their advice you can look for a support group more specific to your baby’s diagnosis and see what those parents’ experiences are.

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  21. you know, i used to tease my daughter that I was going to give my grandson starbucks when I babysat, ( he was toddler) I would tell her I would going to give him coffee & sugar before sending him home but there was never a chance in this world I would ever have done that to a 3 yo much less to a 6 month old. as has been said, caffeine is an addictive drug, i went through months of headaches & other symptoms when I quit caffeine at 28 why the heck anyone would give it to a baby is beyond me

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  22. Why would you give a 6-month-old baby coffee? Can you think of one good reason? He or she isn’t lively enough and needs some caffeine for a boost? I doubt it! I can’t think of any good reasons for introducing a baby to coffee.

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  23. My question to you is why would you give a 6-month-old baby some coffee? Caffeine is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant. If the child drank it accidentally, which I can’t imagine a child that young being able to do so, then I would suggest to monitor them. I can’t understand why people want to give babies, adult foods/drinks that are not appropriate for someone of the age to consume.

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  24. No offence intended, but why would there be a reason to give coffee to an infant? Unless it is prescribed by a doctor to treat a medical condition I would advise not to do so.

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  25. Not a 6 month old but my 2.5 year old constantly asks for coffee when she sees me and her father drinking it since she was about 1.5 years old so we give her a dot of coffee (maybe like a tablespoon or two) and fill the rest of the cup up with milk and tell her it’s coffee lol

    Eight O’Clock

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  26. It would cause jitters and irritability, as well as inability to sleep. I found out the hard way after giving my daughter pumped milk from my morning sessions…. turned out that enough caffeine made it into the milk to affect her pretty obviously. I don’t know that it’s harmful to the infant (aside from being physically uncomfortable), but we both lost a few nights sleep before I figured out what was going on 🤦🏼‍♀️

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  27. I’m no expert on it and I know every child is different, but I started drinking coffee at 6( non-caffeinated) my doctor recommended it because I had respiratory problems I’m not sure if this is important but I had drinking formula all my life cuz I was adopted but anyways I’m 14 now and I’ve never had really any health problems related to coffee

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  28. If I am not mistaken, at least “Dark Chocolate” contains some Caffeine. I am not sure of the exact amount of Caffeine per servings of all brands, and/or if all dark chocolate contents are standard/ per size. Also, I would imagine or strongly hope the amount of cake would be minute/extremely tiny due to risks of aspiration into the throat/lungs. The following event may be extremely rare, but one time is enough forever. I believe the toddler was about 18 months old, and maybe a little older. The toddler was eating a muffin, (and there are muffins made or at least marketed toward younger children to older kids. The toddler somehow got a portion of this soft muffin stuck,lodged, in the airway. The mother was there to attempt to dislodge this soft muffin from the airway. Of course, 911 was on the way as quickly as possible. At the hospital ER., everything humanly possible was done by the dedicated team to remove or manipulate the muffin so that desperately needed oxygen could get to the lungs. No procedure was successful to gain a patent airway to prevent a cardiac arrest, and to deliver oxygen to the brain. I do not remember seeing the word Tracheotomy or cricoid procedure, but I do remember reading about the heroic efforts. (Yes, I have sat by an older toddler, my grandson, who was eating his breakfast muffin and had no trouble.) My soul extended to the toddler, mother, older, but young sibling, and to all who worked so hard and with controlled frantic efforts to resuscitate this young toddler.) Now, I am in no way suggesting that the 6 month old baby was fed a hefty sized serving of cake, and a teacup filled with coffee. However, the baby is still in the process of managing baby food with tongue movements and swallowing, with the baby food still ending up partly on the bib, and table of the high chair. There is a reason for some do’s and do nots. I am sure this was coffee and cake was well intentioned, and the grandmother realizes this was not a best practice in any way, and yes, in the olden days of “yore,” there is no telling what babies were fed or ate. There are warnings fo NOT feeding HONEY to babies until a certain age, and about NOT feeding babies/ toddlers, and kids, teens, etc. unpasteurized milk because of severe health risks. I, as an adult would not choose to drink unpasteurized milk. Back to chocolate, I do believe dark chocolate does contain a certain amount of Caffeine, and perhaps milk chocolate too.

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  29. You might have a very hyper & irritable baby!!
    I was nursing my first baby – he was maybe 3 weeks old – when my mom brought me a new Diet Coke to try (vanilla Diet Coke – yummy!). I drank a can of it … later nursed … then later we were trying to figure out what was wrong with this suddenly wide awake & fussy baby! We never even thought about the caffeine in the soda before drinking it. He has been sensitive to caffeine since before he was born – if I had any caffeine while pregnant he was very active.
    He’s 18 now and still sensitive to it! His younger sister is not at all, it doesn’t affect her at all & never has.
    So, it might just depend on the baby!

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  30. Why would anyone do that? The baby’s immature digestive system is not ready for the harsh acids in coffee, including decaf. Many adults also have trouble with it. By the time the child is four or five years old, on rare occasions he might have a little coffee with milk, just to experience the taste. In olden times children (not babies or toddlers) were sometimes given Cambric Tea, mild brewed tea with plenty of milk and sugar in it.

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  31. The rule for feeding babies is, food before one is only for fun. No water, water, sugar, salt, or nuts. Some babies start to eat pablum or other baby foods before one but you must check with your pediatrician. The only liquid a baby needs is breast milk or formula anything else can harm them!

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  32. It scares me that you have a mind that would even think to ask such a question. Are you the same person who claims their mother microwaved and raped your newborn.? If so, get help!

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  33. My daughter was born two months premature. She was given caffeine to prevent apnea. She also stayed awake, slept in short spurts and fussed a lot. It was tortuous but worth it. She’s a happy healthy teen today!!!

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  34. Possible lifetime coffee addiction. The earlier they have it the more likely they’ll need it. I was still on a bottle when I had my first sip of coffee (bottle broke at 11 months) and I’ve not gone without it since without massive headaches

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  35. I would assume as you have to ask you havent got a clue about caring for a baby and would hope social services would be involved investigating what else the baby is given.Again a really stupid question but you have probably had the attention you wanted.

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  36. A better question is WHY? There is no reason for it. Coffee contains caffeine. Caffeine is not good for kids, let alone an INFANT. This is obsurd.

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  37. My mom would water down coffee and put it in my bottle. This was 40 years ago. I’m mostly ok. I mean, I have health issues that are mostly genetic but I’m not addicted to caffeine. Then again, I have ADHD, and suckily, caffeine does NOTHING for me.
    She did the same thing to my sister, brother, daughter, niece, and nephew.
    For the most part, they’re all fine. Nephew has Asperger’s. My daughter is the same as I am. The niece is perfectly fine.

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  38. If done regularly it can have damaging effects.
    My parents bottle fed me milky coffee with sugar and watered down soda from the age of four months to five years old. As a result I have destroyed teeth and poor nutrition as an adult.
    Remember coffee is not only a stimulant but also an appetite suppressant.
    Please do not feed your children coffee and soda.

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  39. This may not be helpful but if it were my 6 month old and you were the one who gave them coffee, you would be picking your teeth up off of the floor on the other side of room. Their tiny bodies can’t process things like a 6 year old or 16 or 60 year old. They may not have lasting effects but why should a helpless BABY have to experience the side effects of someone being a complete idiot and them somehow coming up with the absolutely stupid idea to give a baby coffee?

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  40. You’d probably have a very awake baby with an upset stomach. Babies are not toys. Please use better sense and only feed this child breastmilk, formula, and appropriate baby food.

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  41. Depends on how much coffee. When my baby was about 4 months old he started asking for the last sip of my coffee on the weekends. It was cold anyway so I let him have it and he loved it, which is very interesting since coffee made me projectile vomit my entire pregnancy. Now that’s our thing. He takes the last sip of coffee from my cup when we’re together. One sip twice a week hasn’t done a thing to him. He’s 15 months old, whip smart, and the sweetest little thing.

    Peet’s

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  42. Why would you even ask that question? Do you want to abuse your child? Harm it or worse? I don’t think that is a real question, I think you’re trolling for attention. But in the off chance you are serious, I would contact the child’s grandparents or other family members and ask them to take care of your child while you see a psychiatrist. You definitely need help. Anyone with an inkling of love and care would know it would be extremely harmful to give a baby coffee. Why that would cross your mind, only a trained professional could know.

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  43. Caffeine is actually used very commonly for preterm-born infants to stimulate their breathing:

    If mothers breast-feed their baby, it will get some caffeine through the milk, although in small concentrations.
    Since children are smaller by size, of course one strong cup of coffee will impact them more than an adult. But I don’t think half a cup of coffee would cause any major issues in a six-month-old.
    Caffeine can, like anything else, be toxic in excess, but you need quite some amount to cause a truly unpleasant feeling, and it is still not serious in the sense of being harmful or life-threatening.
    A strong European-size cup of coffee, or a medium-strength American mug, contains 100 mg. Several grams are usually needed to cause real bad intoxication in adults.
    Serious issues can usually only be achieved by taking pure caffein as a powder. (This is a problematic form of providing the substance, since people will not know how to dose a powder precisely – while most would not normally dare to take 50 tablets or so.)
    Same goes for alcohol – it’s not really an issue if a kid happens to drink it at a one-time occasion. Feeding a small child alcohol or coffee, in more than minuscule amounts, is inappropriate, but how can you call it child abuse if no actual harm is caused? There is a distinction between parents giving a one-time teaspoonful of beer or coffee to a child, and feeding them whole cups or glasses on a daily basis. Should a pre-school or school child get into the habit of drinking coffee in the morning, I think it should be discussed with a doctor, but there probably are no real caveats against it.
    Moderation is the key! In Italy, they serve diluted wine to children. It doesn’t cause more people to become alcoholics, maybe on the contrary.
    The answers suggesting that a career as a drug addict can be predicted if a kid is given coffee, are out of the league hysterical and moralising, and also based on skewed ideas about how caffeine and the brain work. Its main property is to block adenosine, an amino acid that causes sleepiness. Its effect on dopamine is rather weak.
    And people do give cola beverages to children, don’t they? Then the hypocrisy of stigmatizing coffee is evident.
    I don’t like coffee nor caffeine much myself, but it has never been proven to be very harmful. I don’t think it is wise to be addicted to any substances. But once-in-a-while consumption of coffee is probably unproblematic, even for children. However, I don’t think there is any benefit from giving it to a six-month-old. It would just make him or her irritable and awake, maybe even anxious.

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  44. Giving an infant anything aside from breastmilk, formula, or proven and approved “baby food” is an experiment that could have profound consequences. I highly discourage you from playing around like that.
    The wife of a friend would put Coca-Cola in their first childs bottle. Early consequences: their daughters front teeth rotted out. Long term consequences: that early exposure to sugar gave their daughter an affinity for sweets, and she has been obese since adolescence. She is now in her thirties.
    Just don’t do it!

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  45. It is family legend that when my grandfather was a baby his mother had trouble for a while producing milk. This was before commercial baby formula. So it is claimed they gave him coffee, on the theory that even though it wasn’t good food it was better than water. I have no idea how long this was supposed to have lasted but he ended up being a pretty big guy and he always did like coffee. Take it for what it’s worth.

    What would happen if I gave a 6-month-old baby some coffee?

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  46. Why on earth would you think about giving a 6 month old coffee… I’m assuming because you’re smart enough to ask, there’s a different person you’re asking answers for.
    I would guess the baby wouldn’t like the taste. I’m also assuming there’s lots of cream and sugar in it. I’m also assuming you’re lying- as no normal parent would give caffeine to an infant.
    you’re already sleep deprived. So I’m thinking you’re just fishing for an answer because you’re a bored person who wants feedback.

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  47. Actually, infants typically are quite sturdy if their basics are met. Caffeine certainly isnt recommended, but may i share a historical perspective? My husband was the son of an Oregon logger who spent long, long hours in the woods. He fed his infant son on canned milk heated with coffee from his thermos. That son is now over 70 and 5′11″ tall. I must say we read everything we could on the “best” nutrition and took a more traditional approach to our children’s diets.

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  48. In my experience (four children, several grandchildren) nothing happens, nothing at all. All my children drank both tea and coffee, although I am a tea-drinker my husband drinks coffee, so they had their share of both. The end result, all my children are coffee drinkers now, none of them are, or have ever been jittery, nervous or addicted to caffeine, nicotine sadly yes, but caffeine no. My husband has drunk coffee all his life (77 now) as did my father, with absolutely no side effects whatsoever, and to those people who claim that drinking coffee last thing at night keeps them awake, I’d suggest that it’s your mind telling you that since my husband can drink a full mug of coffee before going to bed and still be asleep within minutes! I have done a poll with all of my coffee drinking buddies and they all poo-poo this “coffee keeps you awake” theory and most believe it is just another American fad that we have unfortunately adopted.

    Victor Allen’s

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  49. I used to give mine boiled cow’s milk with 1/2 teaspoon of coffee and 1/2 teaspoon of sugar (before sugar was poison) and my other relatives did the same with tea and more sugar (because they took more themselves) , but I think they were about 9 months. The oddest, inexperienced me, did was stop when my son was 7 months old and hungry not thirsty. I bought him 1/2 of boiled ham and was slowly feeding him this when neighbour came by. As he laughed, I reasoned it was odd not dangerous. They grewn up okay and only have ailments that run in our families as they reach middle age. But I’d hate to have a baby today with all the rules.

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  50. Think about your weight, divide it by one cup of coffee. Take your infants weight probably around 10 pounds or so, do the same. Does that tell you how easy it would be to overdose an infant. So, a tablespoon is probably consistent with a cup of coffee for an adult. Take it another step to equal what it would be to drink an equal amount for an adult? Maybe a pot of coffee? How would that make you feel? Not good. So, please do not give a child coke/pop/coffee/candy/alcohol or any other items meant for someone much heavier! It would not be a “treat”.

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  51. Common sense should tell you to NEVER give a young breastfed baby coffee! Even when breastfeeding mothers drink coffee, caffeine can pass on to the baby through breast milk. Caffeine, even in moderate doses, will cause a baby to become unhappy, jittery, colicky and/or sleep poorly. Too much caffeine is different for every mother and depends on various things such as how well a mother’s body processes caffeine. It is a good idea for breastfeeding mothers to avoid drinking coffee or anything that has high levels of caffeine in it.

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  52. Coffee is a stimulant and it is hard on the digestive tract. It is not good for adults let alone a baby! You will end up with a wide awake baby who is screaming from pain.

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  53. Firstly its a stimulant, that isn’t exactly that great for adults, giving it to a baby can cause distress to the baby and its mother when they would have to try to settle the child, but like anyone, there will be a different reaction from everyone. Coffee never keeps me awake at …

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  54. Under certain circumstances, the effects would be immediate. Very likely a depression skull fracture often accompanied by various fractures of the long bones, scalding due to the hot liquid contacting the skin, and various abrasions and contusions.
    Then… when the infant’s mother got through with you, the father might contribute to your further education as to leaving their child severely alone!

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  55. Baby would likely be cranky and irritable later on but nothing necessarily would happen. At 6 months old some babies are capable of eating and digesting basically all normal foods.

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  56. It happened to me but with tea. I was sick (not seriously) and my pediatrician told her to give me tea. It was 1974…. She gave me Lipton tea and after a while my eyes started rolling up. Turns out he meant herbal tea. I was fine I have been told.
    So, don’t give caffeine to a 6 month old. Not a good idea.

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  57. Why would you ever think that a baby can consume coffee? Give the baby breast milk, that’s what the baby should be getting at that age. The child doesn’t need to have caffeine circulating in its system. Are you serious? Coffee!!!!

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  58. Baby’s bodies are small if I remember my biology baby’s body are mostly water which is why it’s bad to give baby’s straight water I haven’t given a baby coffee but I would recommend not giving your baby coffee until their older than six months giving a baby coffee would be like giving a baby soda or sugary juices like ice tea or stuff like that.
    start with fruit juices like orange or apple juice then when he or she’s a bit older give them a sip of coffee
    edit: my mom just told me that you shouldn’t give a baby coffee at all due to the caffeine.

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  59. The only experience I have with this is my MIL and husband. When my husband was an infant, around 4 months, he had difficulty breathing. Instead of going to the doctor my MIL gave my husband coffee saying it would open his breathing. I’m not a doctor so I don’t know if coffee can do this or not. But every time my daughter is sick she tells me to give her coffee. I have never done this and don’t plan to. I don’t know if it affected my husband or not but he went on to drink coffee as an older child and pretty much drinks it all day as an adult. It has zero effect on waking him up. He in fact typically drinks it before sleeping and falls asleep faster than me.

    Dunkin’

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  60. an honest answer i would say no never give them coffee it will cause dehydration and headaches . funny story my first daughter was breastfed and I cut down to 1 cup of coffee a day so I guess she got some through breastmilk, she was a soother baby and would toss her soother into my coffee cup I would absent-mindedly take it out tap it on the cup and give it back she would toss it again shortly after I would tap it again and give it back, never once did I think she was putting it into the cup on purpose just to get coffee, but when my husband suggested rinsing I off when she did it the baby actually got angry with me and cried, it took a week bug she stopped throwing the soother into my cup. now she’s 14 and begs for coffee every morning.

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  61. Betty MacDonald describes it in her book, “The Egg and I”. All the local people in her neighborhood of rural Washington state give their babies sips of coffee and bites of doughnut. The chapter is titled, ‘All our kids have fits’, fits in this case meaning seizures.

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  62. If you have a hyperactive baby like I had a tsp of coffee would settle him down enough so he could nurse otherwise he ended up loosing weight. That was the only time I have given anything like that to an enfant but it sure worked when I needed it.

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  63. Premature babies were sometimes given a prescription for caffeine, in the past. Small amounts in others cases is fine, but why? They don’t need it. Same with sugar, sodas, etc.

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  64. Well, let’s do the math.
    For an average 70 kg adult, the lethal dose of caffeine is usually around 10 g, or 10,000 mg, but fatalities have been reported at doses as low as 3 g (3,000 mg).
    A typical six month old baby weighs between 7 and 8 kg. So being pessimistic and using the lowest lethal dose for adults (43 mg/kg bw), 301 mg would be the lethal dose. That’s assuming that babies are not much more sensitive to caffeine than adults, which is uncertain because regulatory agencies generally recommend that caffeine-containing drinks should not be given to children under the age of 12.
    A typical cup of coffee contains 100 to 200 mg caffeine. So, assuming that babies can metabolise caffeine as well as adults can (a big assumption), if a baby drank a whole cup of coffee (not very likely) it should not be enough to kill them, but very likely enough to …

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  65. Reply
  66. Q: What would happen if I gave a 6-month-old baby some coffee?
    A: What do you think is “some” coffee?
    I’m tempted to say “They’d explode and you’d have to clean up the mess before going to jail” but that’s facetious and probably not true — they wouldn’t wait for you to clean.
    OK. They’ll be hyper-stimulated if they drink very much caffeine. They may be cranky and irritable. You may end up making them sick for days, and their bowel movements may become either energetic or suppressed, neither of which will make the person taking care of them happy with you. If they overdose, they CAN die, because they’re fairly fragile. SO don’t.

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  67. Nothing good, babies and children for that matter should not be consuming coffee/caffeine, in fact I wouldn’t give it to any child under the age of 13.
    Just don’t do it.

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  68. just don’t
    Caffeine is given as a prescription to premature babies who need to be kept awake and have their brain stimulated. Normal babies do not need it, as I stated it is given as a PRESCRIPTION DRUG. babies don’t need coffee/caffeine. if they accidentally drink a little it shouldn’t hurt them, but that being said if they have any underlying health issues it could actually hurt them a LOT or kill them. So just don’t.

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