What’s the difference between Starbucks Reserve and a regular Starbucks coffee shop?

What’s the difference between Starbucks Reserve and a regular Starbucks coffee shop?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “starbucks reserve roastery coffee blends

0 thoughts on “What’s the difference between Starbucks Reserve and a regular Starbucks coffee shop?”

  1. The Reserves are giant behemoths able to wow you and seat hundred. There’s only a few of them, the largest in the Corporate HQ in Seattle.
    Reserve stores also have reserve coffees in stock for purchase. They are roasted well, and are different than the core coffees.
    Starbucks Reserve tends to carry multiple freshly roasted single origin coffee, and often offers manual brew methods or better automated brew methods, such as the clover.
    Much more grandiose than a much smaller drive thru cookie-cutter Starbucks location.

    Reply
  2. A reserve Starbucks has special roasts that you cannot get at normal stores, they will also typically have a better coffee grounding machine called the Clover.

    Reply
  3. Is there a difference? Is it more than Lexus vs. Toyota? Yes, and more.
    I took my wife to Shanghai last May; we stayed at the old Park Hotel and walked 10 minutes to the Starbucks Reserve Roastery on Sunday morning. It was mobbed at 10 am but I knew Ryan, the roast master, so we got squeezed in. Just walking in blew Karen’s mind. A temple to coffee with two fabulous Probat roasters and an energy that was electric!
    We sampled 4 different coffees over 2 hours and as Karen said, nothing like the “stuff” she normally associates with Starbucks. All 4 were juicy, sweet and highly aromatic. And paired nicely with some breads and treats from the Italian bakery onsite.
    The Reserve is where Starbucks puts up some of the best beans money can buy and they roast them well, not just dark to get rid of defects. The huge copper tower in the middle of the store where the roasted beans are stored is holding a small fortune in goods.
    That Sunday morning we also met the roastmaster for the Milano Starbucks Reserve (which just opened this month) and we promised him and his family we would be there in 2019. That Reserve Roastery, in the heart of great Italian coffee, will go a long way to helping establish Starbucks in Italy/EU. Can’t wait to get there.
    I highly recommend going out of your way to visit a Reserve Roastery. Maybe you were disappointed when Starbucks released “Blond”; I sure was. But the coffees at the Reserve are much better, night and day, Lexus vs. Toyota.

    Reply
  4. A Starbucks reserve store has a cover machine with specialty reserve coffee beans that are most times rare. A regular Starbucks simply just has the core coffees.

    Reply
  5. In short? Everything except the brand and some merchandise.
    Starbucks Reserve features exclusive roasts and blends, exclusive drinks, and highly trained baristas who know and care about coffee. They still use semi-automatic espresso machines, requiring the baristas to tamp their own portafilters. The one is Seattle has its own reserve roastery built in.
    Starbucks Reserve locations are an experience – perhaps a tourist attraction – intended to compete with specialty coffee shops.
    In my personal experience, it was a mixed bag. The drinks were good, and it was my first introduction to the shakerato. However, the barista told me they couldn’t prepare their medium roast single origin as espresso.

    Reply
  6. Starbucks Reserve tends to carry multiple freshly roasted single origin coffee, and often offers manual brew methods or better automated brew methods, such as the clover. I haven’t seen a Reserve with a semi-automatic espresso machine, but I’m not sure if they exist at other shops.
    I’ve had some pretty good drip coffee at a Starbucks Reserve in Buffalo, NY, and they tend to be a good option if there is not a local shop nearby.

    Reply
  7. If you’re referring to the “Roasteries”, they’re just trying to upscale the brand. They have a roaster on-site, so the coffees are arguably fresher. And they’re selling more exotic blends (at least they have more exotic names), at MUCH higher prices. All in all, people, especially in the US, have TOO MUCH MONEY. So they’re catering to the market that want’s elegant and upscale experiences. Just like the original Starbucks stores sold an “experience” not just coffee, these Roasteries are trying to sell an upscale experience. And any marketer knows, all you really need to do to make things upscale is charge more. People tend to think “wow, this is so expensive, it’s got to be better”.

    Reply

Leave a Comment