What makes a password protected wifi network at a coffee shop not as open to hacking as an open wifi network since the wifi password is

What makes a password protected wifi network at a coffee shop not as open to hacking as an open wifi network since the wifi password is freely available? Can’t someone get the password and find your passwords even though it is a private network?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “coffee shop with wifi near me

0 thoughts on “What makes a password protected wifi network at a coffee shop not as open to hacking as an open wifi network since the wifi password is”

  1. There is no difference at all. Anyone who has authorization to sign on to the coffee shop network will be able to peek into the packages floating around. You can minimize this a fair amount by utilizing a guest network configuration where a connected client would only gain internet access but no access at all to other clients on the network. This is a typical service any decent router would provide.

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  2. Nearly all public wifi will have client isolation
    This Mean even in same network file sharing can’t be accessible.
    Extra security measures like ip/cert based admin access etc.

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  3. Rajkumar N Q: What makes a password protected wifi network at a coffee shop not as open to hacking as an open wifi network since the wifi password is freely available? Can’t someone get the password and find your passwords even though it is a private network?
    It’s not the network that is open to hacking, it is the devices on the network that are being hacked.
    As has already been said by Rajkumar N , if the network is set up with the correctly with the right type of router, the router will not allow one device on the network to connect to another device on the same network. Any information you send out cannot be reflected back from the router to another device on the WiFi network. It can be passed only through the router to the Internet. This prevents one device performing a direct attack on the target using the normal network protocols.
    This leaves the possibility of someone ‘sniffing’ the network and intercepting the packets. With WPA2 encryption, although each device will be using the same pass phrase, when each device connects to the router it negotiates its own individual temporary encryption key with the router. Since each device has a different temporary key, which is used to transfer actual packets, then one device cannot listen in to another device’s conversation. The pass phrase for the network has two purposes:
    To allow only those devices with the pass phrase to use the network.
    To handle the initial exchanges where the unique temporary encryption key is agreed between the device and the router.
    There are several different methods that allow two nodes to agree on a private key over a public network where all the packets are in full view, but the key itself is never exposed on the network and cannot be derived from the packets going back and forth in public view.
    Now suppose that the router blocks normal communication between devices on its network, if a hacker can pretend to be the router and is closer to a target device than the real router, then it might be able to perform a direct hack attack on a device. This is where the target device’s firewall comes in. It should only accept packets that is is expecting on ports and from addresses it is already talking to. If this is working correctly, then only the application that sent out a request should receive an incoming connection, and if the response is not what is expected, then the application should block processing. Unfortunately, many applications are not as secure as they could be and will respond to rogue data being delivered to them. A VPN can provide additional protection.

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