What is the perfect temperature of water to add to coffee?

What is the perfect temperature of water to add to coffee?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “temp of water for coffee

0 thoughts on “What is the perfect temperature of water to add to coffee?”

  1. It varies depending on personal taste as well as what your “end goal” for the drink is, but a good rule of thumb is to match the temperature of the coffee. If that doesn’t work try water that is hot but not boiling.
    No thermometer method is to put water into a pot and heat it until you see a couple of bubbles. Turn off the heat, wait a minute or two, then add to the coffee.
    If you do have a thermometer i think anywhere from 110–130 degrees Fahrenheit might do the trick…
    Curious to get clarification on what you intend to add water for. Are you heating water for a pour over brew, pulling an americano or long black, or just watering down some regular coffee to cut down intensity?

    Reply
  2. Different temperatures solubilize different compounds in the coffee. You can use cold water over longer brewing time to get a sweeter coffee or get the bitter flavours out by hotter water. Just like with tea. Look up sun tea or ice tea, ice as in how made not put in the fridge after making.

    Reply
  3. The ideal temperature range for hot brewing is 195° to 205° Fahrenheit or 91° and 95° C. This is hot enough to extract carefully and quickly, but not so hot that it’s uncontrollable. Coffee over 205 degrees Fahrenheit tends to over extract things from the grounds very easily, producing bitter coffee.

    Reply
  4. Your brewer should maintain a water temperature between 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit for optimal extraction. Colder water will result in flat, under-extracted coffee, while water that is too hot will also cause a loss of quality in the taste of the coffee.

    Reply
  5. It depends how you’re making it, but just off boiling is the standard temp. (As in letting it boil and wait a minute or two before using). If you have a calibrated device, I set my kettle for pour over at 203.
    Search YouTube for V60 Hario, you’ll find some really great tips. Also The GRINDER is the most important part of the process, don’t skip, a very good one will last your lifetime and wow, does it ever make a difference. If your choice isn’t heavy to lift, keep looking and keep saving.

    Reply
  6. There are many types of coffees, many types of brewing levels and, therefore, no 1 right answer. In general, high density,light roasted coffees may taste better when extracted in higher temperatures. In general, the general consensus is a brewing temp of 93 degrees and a few point deviation up or down depending on the factors above. Hope that helps.

    Reply
  7. That’s like asking, “How long is a piece of string???”
    Different beans, take a different temperate’s, I’ll say, if warm, then it’ll be, all good, in my broken book, but the other downside too, having too hot water, is it’ll burn the bean flavour, so I’m guesstimating??? 88c is all good??? Haven’t done the testing, because I’m…

    Reply

  8. Reply
  9. I suppose I’m cheating because I’m in Costa Rica, using locally grown coffee, freshly roasted, but we’ve settled on a very scientific method to make the perfect cup.
    Only grind the beans when you’re ready to brew. Dump the ground coffee into a linen brewing sock (“chorreador” if you want to look it up), boil the water in an electric boiler pot.
    When the pot shuts off, feed the dogs. That lets the water cool to the perfect temperature for pour-over brewing. I figure that feeding delay is 5 minutes, give or take. We’re also at 700m elevation (2300′) so we’re not starting out at 100C.
    Sweeten with a touch of local nature sugar (“tapa de dulce”) and blow on it a bit if it’s too hot for your antique lips.

    Reply
  10. If you are brewing coffee from ground coffee beans, then you want it as hot as you can, preferably boiling. Just like you would for brewing tea.
    The heat is necessary to release flavors, (chemicals) from the coffee beans.
    If you are using instant coffee, boiling would be good too otherwise as hot as you can get it.

    Reply
  11. You need to experiment. At a coffee brewing competition in Europe a few years ago, the winner brewed at 83 degrees, but only brewed half a cup then added hotter water after removing the grounds.
    I tried it. It didn’t seem to work for me. I usually aim for 90+ degrees.

    Peet’s

    Reply
  12. Around 200 degrees Fahrenheit is about perfect.
    Water hotter than that can increase bitterness, and lower than that can have inadequate heat to get the best extraction from the grounds.

    Reply
  13. My Keurig has several temperature settings, of which the highest, and the one I prefer, is 192F. It doesn’t seem to matter what type of coffee bean I’m using, the flavour and mouth feel are ideal.

    Reply
  14. Different answers for different brew methods and… for different blends. Traditionally coffee has always been “brewed” with boiling water (ie- water that is 100degrees Centigrade at sea level). However this doesnt mean the very best cup will be produced at this temperature. Most modern espresso machines come with a mixing system that delivers water to the coffee in the grouphead at between 90–92 degrees. However…. depends on the blend of coffee, the roasting… 90–92 might be too hot. Enter the espresso machines of this generation which allow for each brew unit on an espresso machine to be adjusted – temperature wise (and pressure wise- thats a different variable altogether!)
    When making pourover or even french press again the water temperature is a variable that can be dictated by the roast, the blend of coffee and the type (origin) of the coffee. The general rule of thumb is again 90 degrees – up to 96 degrees centigrade. However… again experiment with the variables above to find the best temperature for the coffee in question. It may be the flavors you looking for in the coffee are best extracted at 88 degrees for instance.

    Reply
  15. I’m 82 years old and I don’t like hot lips I don’t want to take a chance on drinking a cup of coffee the minute I put my lips to the cup they’re going to get burned that’s not a nice feeling so that being the case I use a Keurig strictly to make my coffee and I don’t buy store-bought filled K-Cups I bye refillable K-Cups and I have 14 of them and I change them out about every two days. I drink a lot of coffee and sometimes I’ll have to put it in the microwave and reheat it up to a point where I feel that it will taste better. I use Raw sugar to cut the Bitterness down somewhat. I can’t believe the amount of money people spend on those K-Cups with coffee in them the day I spend more than a what I used to spend on coffee years ago is going to be a cold day hopefully I’ll be dead by then.
    I’ll never forget my first time in Tokyo in 1963 traveling to Southeast Asia to teach woodworking as a pre Peace Corps volunteer. When I left the states in September of 1963 coffee was below $0.35 a cup. When I got to Tokyo the price for a cup of coffee in downtown Tokyo was $0.35 I couldn’t believe it. So I didn’t buy one I had a cup of tea instead

    Reply

Leave a Comment