What is the meaning of the phrase “The same water that softens the potato, hardens the egg”?

What is the meaning of the phrase “The same water that softens the potato, hardens the egg”?

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0 thoughts on “What is the meaning of the phrase “The same water that softens the potato, hardens the egg”?”

  1. It suggests that what’s important is what you’re made of, not the circumstances around you. When the water boils — that is, when times get rough for you — are you the potato or the egg?

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  2. It’s supposed to be motivational. It suggests that what’s important is what you’re made of, not the circumstances around you. When the water boils — that is, when times get rough for you — are you the potato or the egg? Will you be soft or hard? Will you get tough, learn and draw strength from your circumstances? Or collapse into a soggy mush?
    OTOH, I suppose it would be rude to suggest that if not a potato or an egg, you could be the frog? Boiling frog That’s the problem with ‘motivational’ aphorisms; they can be trite and banal.
    Similarly: The same fire that melts the butter, hardens the steel. The same air that softens crackers, hardens bread.
    It’s About What You’re Made Of

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  3. Nice one.
    Its meaning is profound and is meant to be referring to ourselves: what makes the difference is the way you are (which stays constant), not the circumstances (which are constantly changing).
    In other words: life is full of events that may turn out to be either traps or opportunities. What draws the line is what we are made of and what we are willing to do/be. Just like water, because it can both soften a potato and harden an egg but is still the same compound.
    Use your talents and skills to deal with life – be it to soften a potato or harden an egg, it is always you who is to face these challenges.

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