What is the difference in coffee made with a percolator instead of the drip coffee?

What is the difference in coffee made with a percolator instead of the drip coffee?

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  1. It’s a very similar process. Small amounts of water are boiled and sent up a tube to drip on the coffee grounds. The difference is that a standard drip brew pulls fresh water from a reservoir and that water only goes over the coffee once and into the pot. In a percolator, it’s pulling its water from the coffee pot, and it’s dripping back into the same container. Eventually, you have coffee being boiled and dripping over the coffee grounds.

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  2. With drip hot water runs through the coffee just once. With percolating a small amount of water circulates through the grounds many times. Percolating coffee makers can make large quantities of barely tolerable coffee available. Drip weilds a better flavor coffee. That said there are other much better methods for brewing coffee. Pour over, French press, espresso machine and others.

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  3. The percolator needs to boil the water/coffee to send it up the tube to be dripped through the grinds. So, if the percolator runs long enough it is boiling coffee and that is a killer. So if you are forced to use an electric percolator stop it before is stops by its self and make it stronger than usual and dilute to taste. That tip of making it strong and diluting to taste applies to all methods of brewing coffee.

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  4. Percolators make coffee by boiling the water in the bottom of the pot so that the hot water rises up through that central tube to be dispersed over the ground coffee. Percolators keep heating water and pouring it over the grounds even after the water has begun to dissolve the coffee into the hot water. It would be like pouring the coffee from the carafe of your drip machine over the grounds, over and over again. Ever tasted coffee from a drip machine that has been sitting on the heating element for a long time? Now, imagine what your coffee would taste like if that overheated coffee were run through the heating element again and over the coffee grounds you already used. That’s what percolated coffee is like.
    Percolated coffee tastes like the carafe it was made in. Over cooked and tasting like aluminum. If the pot is stainless steel, it just tastes like overcooked coffee.

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  5. With drip coffee, also known as pour-over coffee, you heat the water and pour it over the ground coffee beans, which are held in place by a paper filter set into a cone with a hole at the bottom. The resulting coffee will be a function of the temperature of the water, the density of the grind, and the size of the hole (which determines how fast the hot water will drain from the grounds).
    A percolator simply recycles the water continuously, until it is a bitter, undrinkable brew.

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