What is the difference between Turkish and Greek coffee?

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  1. There is no such thing as Greek Coffee. It is Turkish Coffee and it is known around the world as Turkish Coffee. Enough with trying to make lokum, baklava, coffee, dolma, yogurt Greek. They are Turkish, you won’t find anything Turkish in Greece due to their political general hatred against anything “Turkish” fueled by church and politicians. Even the Turkish minority in Northern Greece is not called Turkish and they refuse to call them Turkish. They are called muslim minority.

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  2. The earliest credible evidence of coffee-drinking appears in modern-day Yemen in the middle of the 15th century in Sufi shrines. It was here in Arabia that coffee beans were first roasted and brewed in a manner similar to how it is now prepared. But the beans had to be first exported from East Africa to Yemen, as Coffea arabica is thought to have been indigenous to the former.
    The Yemenis obtained their coffee via Somali traders from Berbera (who in turn procured the beans from the Ethiopian Highlands) and shipped to the Red Sea port of Mocca.
    Below a Dutch illustration of Mocca during the 17th century (picture credit Coffee – Wikipedia ):

    What is the difference between Turkish and Greek coffee?

    Coffee drinking then spread to Persia and the Ottoman empire. Two Syrian traders opened the first coffee shop in Konstantiniye in 1555. Although a hard line imam from Suleyman’s Court initially issued a fatwa against consuming coffee and the Porte hated coffee shops where news and gossip spread like wild fire, the brew caught on. Arab traders introduced plantations in the highlands of the Great Eastern Archipelago (modern day Indonesia), while Venetians imported it from Egypt via Crete and introduced it to Italy. Eventually coffee became more widely accepted after it was deemed a Christian beverage by Pope Clement VIII in 1600, despite appeals to ban the “Muslim drink.” The first European coffee houses opened in Rome in 1645. Coffee was introduced in France in 1657, and in Austria and Poland after the 1683 Battle for Vienna, when coffee was pillaged from supplies of the defeated Ottoman armies. The Ottoman capture of Crete brought Venetian trade to a halt, leading Europeans to source their sugar cane and coffee beans from Caribbean plantations.
    Mocca coffee is peeled, dried and roasted then ground to a flour like consistency, mixed with cold water and brought to simmer on very low heat.
    The typical Arabian Mocca style qahwa (aka Turkish coffee) is a dark roast. The more you roast the beans, the more they lose weight and naturally their price goes up. Greeks who were present in Al-Iskanderiya, the Near East and the Levant were also drinking the stuff and probably traded it around, well before it was introduced to the Balkans. However for cost reasons, Greeks roasted their beans considerably less, as with a lighter roast you need less beans to produce a serving.
    Hence “Greek coffee” is light brown in color , whereas “Turkish coffee”is considerably darker. Coffee importers in modern Greece originated traditionally from the Greek community of Egypt.
    Dried beans ready for roasting

    What is the difference between Turkish and Greek coffee?

    Below roasted Turkish coffee beans to the left and roasted Greek coffee beans to the right:

    What is the difference between Turkish and Greek coffee?

    Note the Greek style ground coffee color and the traditional briki (from Arabic ibrik – not cezve in Turkish). However dark roast “Arabian style” coffee is also available in Greece.

    What is the difference between Turkish and Greek coffee?

    Till 1974, fine ground coffee was known as Turkish coffee in Greece, when in a nationalistic frenzy-because of the Cyprus events- it was renamed Greek coffee (Freedom Fries anyone?). Conversely, in Greek speaking Cyprus it was dubbed “Cypriot coffee”.
    With the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, Turks were deprived from their coffee sources and whenever there was a major foreign currency squeeze, coffee became unavailable. I remember bringing presents of dark roast coffee to Turkish friends in the 80s, every time I visited Turkey.

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  3. A Greek friend told me once that when he was a child everybody used to call it Turkish Coffee, then some advertisement came with the slogan “our coffee is Greek!” and as a sign of patriotism, people start to call it Greek coffee. Turks and Greeks also used to argue about the origin of baklava. Then it turned out that it originates from the Arabs. Nationalism is a disease.

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  4. There is not much of a difference, and to be honest, the Greeks used to speak of their coffee as “Turkish”. What is your proof, you say? All other Balkan populations refer to this coffee making technique as “Turkish”, and I have determined that Albanians, Bulgarians, Bosnians, Croats, Serbs, all refer to it as “Turkish”.
    As such, Greek coffee, much like Greek Yoghurt, is nothing more than an attempt by the Greeks to “nationalize” this beverage, much like the Americans using the term “Freedom Fries” to refer to “French Fries” during the early stages of the Iraq war, where France opposed the invasion.
    The Greeks, due to their grievances against the Turks, saw it fit to call their coffee “Greek” instead of Turkish. That’s fine by me, because Turkish coffee was never a term that was used by Turks themselves, until Nescafe came along.

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  5. There is no such thing as a greek or turkish coffee actually. It was made in arabic countries but it became more popular in anatolia so peoole confused it for turkish or greek

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  6. “None” and “zero” both come to mind. “Greek” coffee and “Turkish” coffee are the exact same thing.
    In fact, Greek coffee was known as “toúrkikos kafés” (Turkish coffee) until the 1950s when it was officially renamed “ellinikós kafés” (Greek coffee) for nationalistic reasons.
    In truth, this kind of coffee is neither “Greek” nor “Turkish” but the common patrimony of all successor states of the Ottoman Empire.
    You can get the exact same kind of coffee in Greece, Bosnia, Bulgaria, Macedonia, Turkey, parts of Syria and Israel. It’s really “Ottoman coffee”.

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  7. After the Turkish invasion of Cyprus (I don’t want to debate wether it was an invasion; army crosses border i.e. invasion) in Greece, and Cyprus as well probably, the Turkish coffee started to be branded as Greek coffee. It has been “Turkish” for many centuries, since the Arabic peninsula was Ottoman a while ago and it’s produced there as well as on the other side of the red sea which was Ottoman again (aside from the Americas), but today we don’t even know ourselves what’s the difference.
    That’s the difference.

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  8. I never had coffee in Turkey. In Greece, “Greek” and “Turkish” coffee are identical. I heard that in Turkey the coffee may include spices (such as cardamon), there are no spices in Greek coffee.

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  9. It’s neither originated from the Turks or the Greeks. So how should someone call it? Greek coffee or turkish coffee or Arab coffee?
    Call it however you want, if you are from turkey call it turkish coffee, if you are from Greece call it Greek coffee etc
    No one cares…

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  10. One point i came across is, Greeks like to consume the coffee in a mug where as in Turkey it is consumed in a porcelain cup, size of espresso cup. You rarely see double size.
    Coffee remains in that cup are used in some kind of fortune telling in Turkey as well.

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  11. Basically the origin of the maker of the coffee. Whether they be from Greece or Turkey. You can also add someone from Armenia, Saudi Arabia and most any other country in that region and come up with a traditional coffee that will be made similarly and taste about the same with variancies in bitterness due to species of beans, roast and strength and time the water is left in contact with the finely ground beans.
    Thank you for the A2A Alex Bugarcic

    Eight O’Clock

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