What is the difference between a cheap coffee grinder and an expensive coffee grinder?

What is the difference between a cheap coffee grinder and an expensive coffee grinder?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “espresso grinder vs coffee grinder

0 thoughts on “What is the difference between a cheap coffee grinder and an expensive coffee grinder?”

  1. There are burr grinders and blade grinders. The blade grinders cannot produce uniform particle sizes and are best used to chop dried herbs and spices. They are not good for coffee at all. Burr grinders produce more uniform particle sizes than blade grinders and can be either flat or conical burr design. The burr grinder output gets more uniform as the price goes up and the conical burrs are usually less consistent than the flat burrs, but not always. The better burr grinders will make a wide range of grind sizes with minimal fines and make a cleaner cup of coffee. Something folks without experience generally don’t understand is the relationship between a quality grinder and espresso. Good espresso depends on the correct water temperature, the correct pressure (at least 9 bar), 25–30 second brew time and a very consistent grind size. The grind size is the variable that allows for a 25–30 second shot. The pressure and water temp are not variable, it is all in the grind! The rule of espresso is to spend most of your money on the grinder.

    Reply
  2. Coffee grinders are one of the indispensable tools for anyone who loves coffee, as whole coffee beans have to be ground into finer particles for hot water to extract the perfect cup of coffee from the beans. Some of the most popular manual coffee grinders on the market today are made by Hario – a renowned Japanese company that has been making iconic coffee brewing equipment for decades. In this blog post, you will find everything you need to know about coffee grinders, what’s the difference, how t choose one…

    Reply
  3. The most simple answer is the evenness of the the grind. A cheap spinning blade grinder creates both bean boulders and bean powders, they are thus extracted slowly and instantly and you get the worst of both ends of the spectrum – sour underextracted coffee from the boulders and bitter over overextracted coffee from the powders.
    A blade grinder also develops more heat and damages the bean as it effectively burns it.
    There is no comparison.
    Once you get into higher end burr grinders the changes are more minute – perhaps the burrs are larger allowing better heat dissipation or the adjustability of the grind size is more accurate or smooth. I would spend good money on my grinder, it is one of the most important pieces of the puzzle in the hunt for great coffee.

    Reply
  4. Most cheap grinders produce quite an irregular grind usually with a lot of “dust” which tends to either more sediment in your filter, to the point of clogging it, or more sediment in your cup.

    Reply

Leave a Comment