What is the best way to help blueberry bushes thrive in a neutral soil?

What is the best way to help blueberry bushes thrive in a neutral soil?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “coffee grounds for blueberry bushes

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  1. Even gardens with acidic soil often find that it is not acidic enough. Blueberry plants like a soil pH between 4.0 and 5.0. I recommend having a soil test done to get an accurate reading. Leaves that are yellowish-green with dark green veins instead of their normal overall bluish-green are an indication that something needs to be done soon!
    Years ago, a customer asked why his blueberries had not grown an inch in 4 years. He prepared the bed as he had been instructed, and everything sounded like textbook advice. When he said the soil test indicated a pH of 7.2….ah ha! A gardener friend told him he needed to lime the plants. No no.
    If you’re planting new blueberry plants [ https://www.wellspringkim.com/2018/07/07/how-to-grow-the-best-blueberry-plants/ ], or have young plants that won’t mind being dug up, consider adding at least one cubic foot of peat moss per plant. Make sure it is mixed thoroughly into the clay soil; pockets of dry peat moss in the soil can stay dry for years because it tends to be resilient to water. The clay particles readily absorb water, helping to keep the peat moss damp. Peat moss can be moistened before adding it to soil.
    Blueberry plants need good drainage. Heavy clay or other soils that don’t drain well can be loosened with the incorporation of a lot of pine fines—again, at least a cubic foot per plant. This product is partially composted, and the pieces are small. But they remain intact in the soil for years. Gypsum, or calcium sulfate, added to the soil or used as a top-dressing will flocculate the tiny clay particles into bigger particles, opening up little channels that allow water, air, and roots to penetrate the soil. This is a slow process, but applied yearly, it can work wonders on heavy soil. Unlike lime (calcium carbonate), gypsum doesn’t change the pH.
    Don’t use manure or mushroom compost on blueberries. The pH and salt content can harm them.
    Using old coffee grounds in or on the soil can help slowly lo…

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  2. They prefer acid soil so you could grow there in pots in erincacous compost. You could also make a raid bed and fill it with acid soil. Go to your local nursery and have a chat with the owner as to what feed you can use on them.

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  3. For blueberries, you should mulch with raw (uncomposted) wood chips or sawdust. That’s what the commercial blueberry farms do in the PNW. Of course we have a lot of spare sawdust here, from the wood industry.
    You can also use raw straw (uncomposted). Keep it moist at first so that it doesn’t blow around too much. It should remain moist in the middle.
    Replensish your mulch each year. Beneficial bacteria will build up in the soil to break down the wood or straw, and you want to keep those bacteria active and producing lots of acid. So feed your soil bacteria, and let them do the work.

    What is the best way to help blueberry bushes thrive in a neutral soil?

    Image source: https://kr.123rf.com/photo_15339525.html
    See the link for other blueberry farm photos.

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  4. Blueberries love acidic soils so try and change it. If it’s just in loose soil try adding organic matter like manure or peat moss to the base which will increase acidity. Blueberry bushes can be quite different depending on the variety and climate of wherever they are so it’s worth checking any similar plants currently growing in the area and seeing what works for them. If watering try to use rainwater or mix 1/2 tbsp vinegar in 1 gallon tap water to keep that acidity up. I find it easier to grow them in large containers so i can maintain the growing conditions separate from the normal soil but however you choose to do it good luck !

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