What is so different about Ethiopian coffee?

What is so different about Ethiopian coffee?

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  1. Legend has it that coffee was discovered by a goatherd in Ethiopia. Consequently they have more experience with coffee than any other grower.
    More realistically, you happen to like Ethiopian coffee, or you’re more used to it.
    Yes they grow good coffee. I’m not entirely sure i’d describe it as especially good.

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  2. Ethiopian coffee in my opinion, tastes much better than westernized or regionally specific coffees. A lot of this has to do with the origins of the coffee plant which occurred in Ethiopia and shouldn’t be confused with natural flavors found in other parts of Africa. Traditionally, Ethiopian farmers would use single estate beans they grew on their own land rather than blend theirs together like Westerners do when they roast them at home or in a commercial setting. This variety provides for an underlying hint that is balanced out nicely when roasted appropriately but by itself retains a slightly nutty flavor profile not often found outside of Ethiopia’s deep valleys and rugged mountainsides.

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  3. I am coffee addict. I have tried all types coffee: from the Indian to Kenyan, to the whole of Latin American products. After some experimentation, I am now convinced that the coffee from Ethiopian farmers is much better quality.
    But, honestly, if you want to compare the quality of the coffee beans, first, you have to study different ways of making coffee because different types cooking tend to tell different information about the coffee you are putting in.
    The Atlantic has an article How to Make Perfect Coffee How to Make Perfect Coffee on how to make a perfect good coffee. Americans tend to like weaker coffee; and the article is based on that assumption. Look at the section that talk about “Classic Methods and Fine Tuning”.
    At that point, you will see different continuums of making coffee. If you want to test the quality of the coffee, you have to test it under the most clarity, least body condition. That is the, the most filtered type of coffee. What you have at state is the clean caffein elements, not the noise. The less body, high clarity method is indeed the best method of making coffee too. Drinking coffee at a high body state is like those people who drink wine with coke. There is no appreciation of the true quality of the item by itself.
    So, my experience is, the Ethiopian coffee tests much better + has higher acidity which corresponds to a higher percentage of caffeine per volume. It is naturally grown (organic); coffee in its natural state. It is not genetically modified; and most of the time, no fertiliser is used. It grows out of the natural water (rain) in the mountains. There is no even artificial irrigation system, for the majority of the coffee production.

    What is so different about Ethiopian coffee?

    What is so different about Ethiopian coffee?

    What is so different about Ethiopian coffee?

    What is so different about Ethiopian coffee?

    It grows slow; much slower than the modern farms in Brazil and other nations. The result, is much better quality coffee, worth waiting longer.
    There is another reason to stick with the coffee coming from small farmers. Since they have smaller amount of production, they don’t pill a huge bulk of coffee at one place at a time. The big productions are susceptible for bulks of coffee packaged in the same place for a long time; it is more likely to develop a mold . Look at the big farms in Brazil. They have no way of producing the coffee without packing it into a big pill. The bigger the farm, the more deadlier for the consumer.

    What is so different about Ethiopian coffee?

    The beans at the ground will be moldy.

    What is so different about Ethiopian coffee?

    Half of this coffee will contain mold. But, the consumer never knows because it comes grind and packaged. You will know it only when you see the beans; rarely happens for the Western consumer.
    You know, mold is a deadly fungus for the brain. It kills you slowly and softly; by decaying (ageing) your brain cells. I recommend you to check a guy called David Asprey; the Bulletproof radio. He has a documentary on molds; and he talks about the dangers of moldy coffee .
    When I am in Ethiopia, I buy my coffee directly from the farmers. When I am in Europe, I ask a travelling friend to pick some coffee for me. I drink Ethiopian coffee throughout the year.

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  4. Due to events in history some of the modernization of the agricultural industry that grows and processes coffee by passed Ethiopia during 70–80 and 90s as there was war and civil disruption.
    Ethiopia until its recent economic rebirth in the 2000 was much poorer as a result it’s coffee had less pesticides and less fertilizer and other inputs used on it during its growth and processing and coffee production.
    So the coffee is grown slower at high altitude in a low pollution environment by small farmers.
    So in hipster terms
    It is slow grown, small batch hand processed by African artisans.
    The net result is higher acidity and caffeine levels but with a broader range of flavour.

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  5. Southwestern Ethiopia is perhaps the original birthplace of Arabica coffee , and the coffee from this region has a great deal more genetic diversity . Beyond the stability and vigor of genetically stable cultivars, coffee from this region may also have greater disease and pest resistance.
    From the perspective of flavor, coffees from the Oromia and Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples’ Regions are some of the highest-grown anywhere in the world. High grown coffees tend to have (and this is a big generalization) higher perceived acidity and greater sugar content than those that are grown at lower elevations. From my understanding, this has more to do with the growth rate and diurnal temperature variation than it does with atmospheric conditions like CO2 availability.
    Another factor that makes Ethiopian coffees unique is the processing methods used in this region. Both fully washed and ‘natural’ coffees (those where the coffee seed is dried in the fruit) are processed expertly by people with many generations of experience. The process applied can also be slightly different from other coffee producing countries in that the Ethiopian process (another generalization here) implies that there is a second soaking of the coffee seed after the full washing process.

    Victor Allen’s

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  6. As usual, this is one of those questions that cannot be answered truthfully. Why? Because “so good” is a subjective judgement. What might be so good for me might easily be intolerable for you, and doubtless vice verse.
    If instead, however, you had chosen to put three words into Google, “Ethiopian coffee Wikipedia”, you would have found the following sentence: “ Ethiopia is where Coffea arabica , the coffee plant, originates.” Because of this, some people feel that coffee that is grown in Ethiopia must be good. It’s certainly the case that some growing regions in Ethiopia have conditions that do go towards good coffee. Harar, for instance, produces some lovely beans; but Harar is not representative of Ethiopia as a whole.

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  7. I’ve never had a cup of coffee I didn’t like, granted some were better than others, but, I usually don’t ask which coffee I’m being served, and the coffee, I buy, as long as it tastes good, doesn’t matter where it’s from.

    Eight O’Clock

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  8. Many people say its strong taste, but I would go with how it’s drunk. Often Ethiopians don’t drink coffee for its stimulating effect, they might, but the main point is coffee ceremony is for people to talk to eachother, back in the days of my grandparents it was kind of a morning briefing of the village affairs. You don’t see that thing enough in towns these days because they watch the news on youtube and tv.

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  9. Ethiopian coffee beans are known for their distinct fruit flavors and a mid to high acidity. They make a great cold brew coffee, or an afternoon brew when one is looking for something a little distinct.
    Ethiopia is considered the birthplace of coffee, ever since the propagation of a legend about a goat farmer popping a few of the cherries and, well, having the best day of goat farming in his life.

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  10. Coffee from Ethiopia is known for its bright fruited and floral flavors. These coffees typically have a higher acidity, light to medium body and complex flavor notes. The beans are either washed or naturally processed. The processing method used (​2​​​) has a huge impact on the final taste of the coffee .

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  11. Most Ethiopian coffee is organic and there are trees which grew naturally in the wild. As a child, I grew up in Sidama (south Ethiopia where plenty of coffee is cropped), where we used to pick coffee beans from the forest.
    Almost every house hold in Sidama has coffee trees at the backyard. I went to my parents’ with my daughters last September and I made my children to pick coffee beans from the trees at the backyard.
    When I was around 12 I used to have the tea made of the yellow coffee leaves.
    Let alone the coffee, the leaves have increadible tastes. And most of all the most expensive coffee is harvested from Yirga Chefe, in the south Ethiopia also.

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