What happens to the flesh of coffee cherries?

What happens to the flesh of coffee cherries?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “can you eat coffee cherries

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  1. They are sacrificed to the Coffee Gods.
    I hope others have a more informed answer, but as I understand it, the fruit containing the bean, or seed, is left to dry – in some cases, sun-dried – and depending on how it’s processed, washed off.
    There are washed process and unwashed process coffee beans. The latter is often referred to as natural. The latter retains some of the flavor of the dried or fermenting coffee fruit.
    So if my understanding is correct (though I’m not sure) the fruit isn’t harvested, or retained, in the traditional sense. It’s removed via processing and is considered a disposable by-product.

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  2. Depending on the coffee processing method (if it’s a natural processed coffee they are left to dry with the coffee seeds on patios and the flesh left on), the flesh is stripped from the cherry with a depulping machine. The beans are then separated by weight with the ripest floating to the bottom of the tank.

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  3. I like Peter’s answer and I will complete it. There is a by-product of coffee called Cascara (literally the peel) it is coffee flesh and when you infuse it it makes a kind of very fruity tea (warm it tastes a bit like Roibos, called it tastes red fruits and citrics).

    What happens to the flesh of coffee cherries?

    I personally love it cold with sparkling water and lime. It has also quite a punch.
    Hope that helps!

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  4. While a percentage of the coffee cherry pulp by-product is composted using vermiculture or vermicomposting for organic fertilizer on coffee plantations, most of the coffee pulp goes directly to huge waste disposal sites.

    What happens to the flesh of coffee cherries?

    There have been many attempts to turn the discarded coffee cherry pulp into a value added product, however it is generally viewed in the industry as either unusable, hazardous, or of negligible value. This is because the waste products are relatively acidic, corrosive to equipment, and difficult to dispose of safely.
    Even the idea of composting is difficult to make commercially viable due to the big extensions of land and hard labour that is required to implement this process coupled wi…

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