What does Dunkin Donuts do with their unsold donuts at the end of the day?

What does Dunkin Donuts do with their unsold donuts at the end of the day?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “homeless woman throws hot coffee at donut shop owner

0 thoughts on “What does Dunkin Donuts do with their unsold donuts at the end of the day?”

  1. The ‘closers’ inventory whatever is leftover and write the numbers on a sheet to help the person who orders donuts know what is selling or not.
    And then they are thrown in the trash.
    Now. *SOME* Franchises will allow their employees to take home leftover donuts. But I can tell you that this grows old pretty darn fast. Just as some franchises will allow their employees to eat donuts at work. Again, that grows old.
    Some, however, have very strict policies against taking home leftovers, due to the fact that there have been lawsuits and such. It’s also a reason why Dunkin usually doesn’t donate their leftover donuts to homeless shelters or the like any more.
    One franchise I worked for (out of three) years and years ago up north had different rules for different stores. In one of the stores, there were no cameras, and it wasn’t the best neighborhood. I was told as the closer (and as a pregnant one at that) I could do some things as I saw fit. I had a few homeless guys who could be trusted enough that they kept an eye on me during the day (if anyone got mouthy with me, they queued up and got rid of the problem before the cops would show up!) And they helped me out by doing some cleanup like mopping or taking out trash at the end of the night. In return, I saw to it they had at least one meal when I came on shift around noon, and since we closed at 6 pm, the two of them got to take whatever donuts they wanted out of the throw-aways (this was back before the days of the current Dunkin Standards, back in the late 90’s. We didn’t even track throw-aways back then!) My shop was so small that donuts and all other bakery items were made in the biggest store of the five-store franchise and trucked over twice a day.
    Needless to say, those two guys loved my five days a week because they knew they didn’t have to worry about eating, and if I had a slow period and I knew I had to dump coffee, they knew they’d get coffee before I did, on the house. And it was the one Dunkin they didn’t get thrown out of. But arrangements like that are probably a rarity these days with as strict as Dunkin’s corporate is, if a bigwig walked into that today, the repercussions on the franchise owner could be pretty harsh.

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  2. When my wife was pregnant with our daughter her cravings were tortellini and strawberry frosted Dunkin Donuts. So, the guys at the D&D got to know me during those 10 months. We spoke about it a few times being a craving of my pregnant wife. I wouldn’t buy anything else and we’d chat for a few minutes. The only time they would do anything special is if it was minutes before closing. They would give me all the strawberry frosted donuts for the price of 1 or 2 depending on how many I was getting. Or – ask if I wanted any other donuts for free. Please note, I was already buying something, had been a customer for months, never asking for anything free and not just looking for a handout.
    Similar situations while driving for uber, using D&D for coffee and bathroom breaks. If it was minutes before closing a…

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  3. I have seen them throw them in a large bag. They throw all of them in the same one. And they will give them to a homeless person or to a food bank. Which i think is great that they do this. I used to know a girl who lived on the street and she would get them when she could and bring them around to everyone. Not just her friend’s in the same position. She would frequently come to see if i would like some. Which was very nice. So i would fix her a regular meal when she’d come. This is just what i have seen i don’t know if they still do this. I certainly hope they do.

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  4. In the fall of 1978, when I was a 19-year-old college sophomore, a Dunkin Donuts’ employee at closing on a Saturday evening in Laramie, Wyoming, gave me all of the donuts left in the shop for the cost of a dozen glazed. I took approximately twenty dozen donuts to the seventh-floor lobby of the White Hall dormitory on the University of Wyoming campus and was celebrated for a good two hours. It was a triumph made easy by the random generosity of a donut-shop dude and, to this day, still ranks right up there among my favorite memories.

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  5. When I worked at Mr. Donuts back in the late 70s which was eventually bought out by Dunkin Donuts we put the left over donuts in barrels out back and a pig farmer would pick them up to suppliment his pig feed. I don’t know if he had to payfor them ahead of time or not. Never was there when he picked them up. But there was empty barrels the next day. Also the help was allowed 3 fresh donuts per shift to eat. I always had 2 jelly donuts one with strawberry and one with bluberries then a chocolate fiilled one. Every once in a while I would change it up.

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  6. I’ll never forget.
    Some years ago there was a video showing rats in New York City eating the donuts after hours. They ended up shutting down that Dunkin Donuts store due to health violations. I think the lesson is to never leave donuts sitting overnight.

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  7. I don’t know what DD does but many years ago my wife’s parents owned a donut shop and when her mother got sick my wife and I ran it for them for a couple of years. We sold the daily leftovers as day old donuts the next day, but gave away the left over donuts on the weekend. I used to take them to someone on my way home. We had a couple of neighbors who didn’t like us because we were Jehovah’s Witnesses so I started regularly dropping off a big box of donuts and sweet rolls at their houses. Before long they would wave at us like we were best friends when ever we saw them. So, the way to some people’s hearts really is through their stomachs.

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  8. They cut them up, dip them in batter, deep-fry them again, and sell them to McDonald’s as chicken nuggets.
    I do not know Dunkin’s specific policy, but most major chains either dump them, or donate them to a food pantry or soup kitchen.

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  9. Up to the individual franchise… in Boston some sell for half prince, or even 80% off. Also loads of left overs go to the local fire house, cops, and ambulance workers… downtown even the people waiting in the ER are treated to free donuts.

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  10. A2A Usually there are not that many left. They put them on sale fifteen minutes before closing. If they don’t sell, they may even put them in the refrigerator and have them on discount the next morning. Each store is different. Check with your store.

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  11. As teenager many many years ago, I worked for DD inside a mall. At closing time, leftover donuts, considerable amount of the same kind, were packed up and sent to the main DD store a few blocks away to be sold, since it was open 24 hrs. A lot of times we also gave some away to mall workers if they would have them.

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  12. Sometimes DD freezes there donuts and leave then for display on the window so people can see they only tell that secret to the people that have worked there for years. That is why the donuts on the display window look so fresh. But turns out there are actually frozen.

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  13. I once knew the owners of a farm who had arranged to get all of the unsellable stuff from the local Duncan donuts and feed them to their pigs.

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  14. At my store, we toss out the old donuts at the end of the night. I personally don’t usually give away donuts for free, simply because I used to get a lot of people coming through just to demand free donuts .

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  15. Yes, Dunkin’ throws away all of the unused food at the end of the day. It is wasteful, but don’t try to take complete advantage of it. Plenty of times customers come in minutes before closing asking for doughnuts but not wanting to pay since “it’s going to trash anyway.” Well, it’s still store hours so you have to pay.
    Sadly, the company doesn’t donate the food or even give it away to customers. Rather, according to one employee, it actually instructs its workers to throw everything away . Dunkin’ employee Bryan Johnston uses his TikTok platform to showcase a day in the life of a Dunkin’ worker.Jul 13, 2022
    Many restaurants refuse to donate leftover food because they’re afraid of getting sued. However, according to the Huffington Post, the Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act protects restaurants from civil and criminal liability in the case of illness related to donated food.
    I got this information from different websites. So you can see for yourself what they do with the leftover food.

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  16. I worked at a Dunkin Donuts in my teenage years. Every day, we’d fill multiple garbage bags with the leftover donuts and have to throw them away. Employees were allowed to take some home if they wanted. I usually brought home a few to my brother as a thank you to him being my personal chauffeur.

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  17. I have no idea, but ftom the c way they usually taste around here I would say they sell them the next day! Lol. I’m NOT a fan of DD. (I work at Krispy Kreme) Our Owner is a Great Guy who always tries to make good use of any left overs. Employees can take them, or we call the soup kitchen and shelter. Also the big apartment building in town mostly occupied by the elderly.

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  18. Years and years and years ago, I was working in the US not far from a local Dunkin’ Donuts. I’m not sure if they actually had an ‘end of the day’ as they seemed to be open all the time…but anyway, if you went in after midnight, you could purchase a dozen donuts for $1. This always seemed to me like a very reasonable way to deal with any donuts left over from earlier in the day. Because of the time, they didn’t get queues and queues of people. Just the odd person, like me and my colleagues, who were on a night shift, or lorry drivers passing through or someone coming back from a night out. There were never more than two or three people in there when I went in after midnight.

    Victor Allen’s

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  19. According to my neighbors kid who works at a local Dunkin’ Donuts establishment, they keep them and sell them at a police discount to cops who eat at said establishments.

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  20. Thanks for the A2A!!
    While I assume they toss them, I’m a curious creature, and have emailed them directly in hopes of finding out for certain.
    I’ll share if I get an answer!!

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  21. I would expect they through them away as they are a business and to not do so might give people the wring idea and lose them money. They are companies like pret a manger who give all their left over sandwiches to the homeless which is a much better policy to have. Though probably not with donuts.

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  22. Many years ago, I worked in a small electronics company that was family run.
    When I was hired back in the early 80’s as an assembler, we on the assembly floor were numbered around 40 of us total personell employed by the company. There were also about six others who were actual family members who owned the company. Minimum wage at that time was $6.50 an hour. My starting wage.
    Darned good thing I lived in low income housing with most expences paid and rent based on income.
    Yes, the wages for new employee’s were low. But the family were very kind, knowledgable, and professional. Best of all, it was an easy going and relaxed atmosphere. In short order I was accepted as another member of the family who accepted me as one of their own who just needed “a little looking after” because “I” had the honor and distinct priveledge of being their very first employee with a disability. To say it was “Funny” watching the workers falling all over themselves trying to make sure I knew how to do my new job? And, that I did not accidentally hurt myself in the process? Well, for the first 2 or 3 weeks, until my fellow workers got used to me, and how I tended to do things a bit differently than the “Norm” they were unintentionally pretty funny.
    Because of the low starting wage turnover was pretty high. Those who decided to remain usually moonlighted with other jobs. One new hire, a young lady, worked at Dunkin Donuts at night. As a perk she was informed she could take all the left over donuts she wanted, home for free cause it was regrettable to toss perfectly good donuts. She graciously took advantage of that perk and roughly every other day brought in two or three dozen “FREE” boxes of assorted Dunkin Donuts! In short order SHE was the favorite employee of our little company. Untill,…
    One evening at the end of her shift at Dunkin Donuts, Her manager noticed she was taking 3 dozen donuts with her and was about to walk out the door.
    He stopped he and said he had noticed ever other day she was taking about 3 dozen donuts with her. But, she didn’t seem to be gaining any weight? He asked off handedly what she was doing with all the donuts? She, didn’t know what he was getting at. So, she truthfully told him of her day job and how she was bringing these extra donuts to the workers as an early morning snack.
    According to what she said happened next,… The manager took a momentary deep breath, turned beat red,…. And EXPLODED in a flurry of curse words and obsenititys some of which she had never heard before! Next, he promptly told her to throw out the 3 boxes she was carrying, And from that point on was never allowed to take another box of donuts home again.

    Peet’s

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  23. I know I am not addressing the question directly however still worth it .
    In UK we have an app called TooGoodToGo. It sells leftover yet good consumable food from a lot of shops that have signed up to be included. Food is generally half price and available upto 24 hours in advance by way of what they call a magic box, which could include anything the shop has in excess on that day.
    That’s a great way to cutdown food waste and recoup some of the cost for the restaurants. Am sure similar arrangement exists elsewhere as well but if not, worth considering something like this.
    Another such initiative that I know off..wasabi and itsu have special timings after which everything is half price on the day.

    Eight O’Clock

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  24. There was a time in the USA, when all bakeries included display areas marked as “Day Old”, and sometimes even “Two Day Old”, with leftover products on sale in those areas (often for half-price or lower). Apparently, this is no longer practiced, with unsold (but still perfectly good) product being discarded at the end of every day now (blame liability insurance carriers and a sue-happy society).

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  25. As a former dunkin worker i will say this much at the dunkin i worked for … we had to throw them out most of the time. Other times the USO would come for them.

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  26. Some stores throw all or part of the unsold away.
    Some donate their bagels and pastries to places like churches and shelters.
    The rest try to resell them the very next day, along with their samdwiches, coffees, and teas.

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  27. I don’t know if this is still the case but when I was a teenager, a neighbor of ours who raised pigs had an agreement with a handful of Dunkin’ Donuts shops in our area where he would pick up the donuts that were more than a few hours old. He fed them to his hogs to offset his feed expenses.

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  28. I don’t know about Dunkin’ donuts but I sprained the first 10 years of my working life starting at age 14 working in restaurants. Most of the time they would feed us for little or nothing. But toward the end of my restaurant career they started throwing the food out instead of giving it away or allowing us to take it home. I think it’s a crime or at least should be when there are so many homeless people out there. I understand that there’s too much litigation in this country and that’s a big reason why many restaurants do not allow their food to go to homeless shelters. But at the very least you would think they would donate some of it to animal rescue centers. But I have a story that’s just as disgusting maybe even more so. Years ago I was going around with my nephew collecting aluminum cans for an aluminum can drive he was having. We were going through dumpsters behind several businesses and one day we decided to look in the dumpster behind a famous national shoe chain. When we opened up the dumpster we were flabbergasted it was almost full to the top with shoes of all kinds brand new never worn and just because they weren’t able to sell them they took a carpet knife and made slits down the sides of every shoe so that they couldn’t be worn by anyone else. Now shoes above all …

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  29. Every one seems to be talking about the end of the night. Around here they are open 24/7 so they never really have a end of day closing. I would imagine that they trash the ones that have been sitting a long time but never really have to throw out a lot at once. I’m sure that the franchise decides the best way to handle the leftovers.

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  30. Well if it’s like what Krispy Kreme did, they probably throw them out. When Krispy Kreme first came along they were giving loads of free samples, and people were lining up. Huge lineups. I heard when the lineups dispersed, the just chucked them. Imagine having enough donuts to feed a line a mile long. They’re bound to make extra. And unfortunately, I don’t think donuts keep long enough to give to a homeless foundation. Now that I think of it, I hope I’m wrong because all that wastage makes me sad.

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  31. Honestly, they’re tossed at the end of the day. While I was working there, I remember asking a co-worker why we couldn’t donate them to a shelter, or something. The way she explained it, was that if anyone were to get sick eating the leftover donuts, Dunkin would be liable.
    Also, the fact that the donuts sit out all day in an open-air store, being handled (regardless of tissue paper, or gloves) by emp…

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  32. I worked at DD while a freshman in College. It was a couple of decades ago. I remember there were 2 donuts delivery, one at 5:00am, the other at 12:00pm. Everyday we dumped the morning donuts to make way for the fresh ones. My boss always told me to take whatever I wanted before we threw them away. I would always take a dozen or 2 of mixed donuts home. My 4 siblings loved them!

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  33. When I worked part time for 2 months at a Dunkin’ Donuts / Baskin-Robbins from August thru October 2018 in Jacksonvile, FL, from around 9:30pm to closing (10pm) each night after we counted the donuts, muffins, etc and wrote the numbers down on a paper, they allowed the workers on the last shift to take as many donuts home as they liked and then we threw away all of the leftover donuts.

    Dunkin’

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  34. I worked the night shift, 11 pm to 7:30 am at, let me say, a Duncan Donut kind of place. If the community believed that we gave away the unsold donuts people would have lined up for free donuts every night (the police followed by college students) and sales would have declined.
    I usually tossed them in the trash bin out back. Every once in a while an agreement would be made to donate unsold donuts to a group such as Cub Scouts or Boy Scouts (for a tax write off). The Scouts would heat them the morning of the first camp and they were said to be delicious.
    After living in Africa where food was scarce I was heart broken to see food wasted. But, then, donuts are not good food (mostly fat, sugar and carbohydrates).

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  35. I used to work in a local bakery back in the 1970’s when I was in high School. The owner told us that we could take as many sweet roll home as we wanted after our clean-up shift was over. But he said to stay out of the refrigerated section. Also, he would donate dozens and dozens of “day old” products to retirement homes and other needy organizations. In spite of this generosity, we still threw away about three full-sized garbage bags full of sweet rolls every day!
    I stayed away from most of those sweets as I didn’t really have much of a sweet tooth in spite of my profound use of marijuana in those days. My buddy who worked with me did not fare so well. By the time he graduated high school I believe he had 13 cavities in his teeth!

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  36. I worked at two locations in NY. All the leftover donuts will be in a black garbage bag around 1–3 at night after all the fresh donuts is born and ready to be eat by the lovely people .

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  37. Honestly they usually throw them out which sucks and its wasteful af, but employees are allowed to eat exactly 2 free donuts or 6 free munchkins on the days they work

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  38. We have to throw them away at the end of the day. I’f the closers wish to have a half dozen or full dozen they can, but must toss the rest. I know that some states have laws about what is and is not to be done with food at the end of the day.
    If anyone has anything to add please do

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  40. Some Dunkin Donuts Shops still make their own Donuts!
    Most receive their donuts delivered in the very early morning hours. But some store owners were old school and most likely owned the building they were in and never removed their kitchen equipment. Your best bet at finding one of these places is to look for a Dunkin that is in its own stand alone building. The old time stores, always had seating for customers and never needed to spend money to remodel.

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  41. I do not work for Dunkin’ Donuts, but I do work for a large grocer that ends up with lots of unsold baked goods every day. We mark them down and try to move them out that way, but once they have gone out of date, we still have two options.
    The first, and preferred option, is to donate the out-of-date product to a local food bank. In order to do this, we have to make sure we freeze them on the date they go out of date. But, our employees are human, and mistakes are frequently made.
    If we miss the window to donate to the food bank, we keep a bin for “organic recycling”. That does not mean organic in the modern sense, but in the old – products that are organic in nature, but not meat, such as some dairy, most produce, nuts, pasta, and pastries. A local company, which has many specialties, picks up the contents of this bin every week. They then process this waste and usually turn it into pet food.
    That company pays us a nominal fee for taking this waste, but we do not make money off it that way. It is profitable for us because anything that can get hauled off at someone else’s expense saves us money. We pay the garbage company to empty our dumpster, so it’s nice to have someone else pay us for the right to remove garbage.

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  42. We count them and toss them , we can’t really donate them anywhere because they don’t last at all no matter if you freeze refrigerate etc.

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  43. At my store we just record what’s left on the waste sheet and toss them in the trash. First time I closed I cried because I was so upset to be wasting so much food.

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  44. as far as I know all locations have to write down the amount to keep record of their losses. Some allows the employees to take them home when they leave after closing, but some don’t allow it and make the employees throw them away. Depends on location and management, really.

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  45. Ryan got it right, all the way down to the fact that it’s different between franchises.
    At my store, we toss out the old donuts at the end of the night. I personally don’t usually give away donuts for free, simply because I used to get a lot of people coming through just to demand free donuts.
    So I stopped that nonsense.
    (Very few things are more irritating than hordes of high teenagers literally demanding their free donuts or the occasional grouchy elderly person who thinks I owe them something just because they’re my senior.)
    Every now and then if I like a customer and we have excess, I’ll ask if they want some extras or just throw in more, but that’s quite rare, especially since we’ve been cutting back our orders to account for the excessive waste.
    If I have a lot of old fashioned, I’ll give them to people who want to feed them to their dogs because dogs are good people.
    Otherwise, sure we can take them home, but they’re quite stale by that point and honestly working in a donut shop makes you sick of donuts after a little bit.
    And they’re actually changing the policies on us taking them home at my store. It’s not being enforced yet, but recently we signed a thing saying we have to pay half price if we take any because of budget cuts.
    But honestly, with how stale they get sitting under the lights from 4am till 11pm, it’s really not worth it.

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  46. We had a nice experience very late in the evening coming back from a trip. We stopped at Dunkin’ Donuts to get a cuppa tea and while there I figured I would get a donut and this was about 10 minutes before they were due to close, 11pmish. I was trying to decide what I wanted, I am not a frequent or a big donut eater although I do like them, and they told me to take whatever I wanted, and they would just charge me for the tea and donut that I was originally going to order.
    So I got a couple of bagels, croissants maybe and some donuts and I don’t remember what else, pretty much a box full of stuff to munch on while we drove the hours still to go to get back home. Helped keep me awake for the rest of the trip and was a very nice experience.
    Having read others’ comments here, I see that they probably broke some sort of rule, but I’m not gonna complain! 😁
    P.S. I will add that this was on a back country Highway a mile or so out of a relatively small town and I was clearly going to be the last customer there that evening and probably there hadn’t been any other customers for quite some time before us. There was hardly anybody on the road at that hour in that part of the country.

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