What are some questions to ask investment banking recruiters?

What are some questions to ask investment banking recruiters?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “investment banking coffee chat questions

0 thoughts on “What are some questions to ask investment banking recruiters?”

  1. You can ask them questions like:
    How was the investment banking unit organized?
    How group selection goes?
    If I have passed the recruitment process?
    You can ask them several queries, which are not a concern. According to Victor Sierra Venezuela , investment banks follow a strict recruitment process and you should think about what questions they are gonna ask?

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  2. Ask for:
    – Of course the name of the bank, so you can research past deals
    – How many rounds in the interview
    – Have the placed someone before at the same spot? If so try to find the person on Linkedin and ask him some questions
    – What product or industry group you will be interviewing for (ie. generalist, healthcare, M&A)
    – How big the team is / structure
    – If a boutique, who are the well-known MDs that jumped ship from a BB
    – Expected base comp

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  3. You could ask;
    1.What do you know about investment banking analyst position?
    2.why you are interested in investment banking?
    3.meaning of cost of debt and cost of equity.
    4.Formula to calculate working capital.
    5.Difference between merger, acquisition and amalgamation.
    6.Enterprise value, equity value,goodwill and how it’s calculated!
    7.Main valuation methodologies.

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  4. I assume you’re asking this in the context of going through a campus recruiting type process for investment banking opportunities. If so, here are some questions to ask. Note that one of the more likely scenarios where you may have a chance to ask questions is at the end of an interview. If so, you’ll probably only have time for one or two, so you can pick and choose which are most relevant to you from the suggestions below. Obviously you can spread your bets by asking different questions to different interiewers (or, perhaps, the same questions to multiple people to see if their answers are consistent!)
    How is the investment banking unit organized?
    If I were successful in this process, how would my group placement be determined?
    Are people ever placed in groups they don’t want to be in?
    Where is M&A work done? Within an industry coverage group or within a specialized M&A team?
    If the latter, and I am in an industry group, how much opportunity do I have to work on M&A transactions?
    On average, what proportion of analysts’ time is spent on pitching versus working on live transactions?
    Historically, what proportion of summer interns tend to receive offers to return full-time?
    Do many of those not get accepted?
    If hired as a full time analyst, is it a 2-year program (with a 2-year contract) or open-ended?
    Is accelerated promotion to associate possible?
    On a 2-year timeframe?
    What proportion of analysts area typically promoted on the accelerated timeframe?
    What proportion of full-time analysts are still at the firm in the third year? [For this question, you might be looking for a high percentage if you care about retention, or a low one if you want to know whether analysts at this firm tend to get access to the best external opportunities at hedge funds and PE firms]
    When analysts leave, what are the most common reasons and destinations?
    I recognize the work/life style that I am signing up for. Some firms have taken steps to mitigate excessive work schedules for investment banking analysts. Are there any initiatives of that sort here?
    What is the approximate male/female ratio like among your entry level hires?
    Do you offer a formal training program?
    How long is it?
    Once the training program is completed, what opportunities are offered for ongoing learning and development?
    Will I be assigned a mentor?
    You can pick and choose from the above according to your circumstances and what matters to you. Some of the questions are a little more pointed than others, so you may want to save them until you’ve received an offer, at which point it’s reasonable to make them work for your signature, even if some of the questions make them a little uncomfortable.
    I write answers reflecting my best advice, views and insights built up over 15 years as a recruiting leader at Goldman Sachs, BlackRock and Point72. When I’m not writing on Quora, chances are I’m looking for aspiring future hedge fund analysts to join the Point72 Academy

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