Should a different grind level be used for dark vs. light-roasted coffee?

Should a different grind level be used for dark vs. light-roasted coffee?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “coarse ground dark roast coffee

0 thoughts on “Should a different grind level be used for dark vs. light-roasted coffee?”

  1. That’s a really interesting question!
    And the answer is- in theory yes, but in practice maybe not.
    From personal experience, you can get different “flows” of espresso when using two different roasts or types of beans with the same grind settings. Generally, a lighter roast feels denser or more tightly packed than a darker roast. Is this because the darker roast has less moisture or is more brittle, so it allows more water through? Maybe. It may just be inherent variability in tamping pressure. I haven’t actually tested this systematically, so I can’t say for sure.
    So in theory, for the exact same bean, a lighter roast should be more coarsely ground to counteract the “tightness” inherent to the roast.
    Its funny because I’ve wondered about this same thing, but I’ve always ended up trying to adjust my tamp pressure rather than adjust grind setting. One of these days I should test your theory out.

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  2. No, the brewing method dictates the fineness of the grind, not the roast. But, there may be an indirect connection between fineness and roast in some cases. For example, I prefer darker roasts for espresso, and that brewing method calls for a fine grind. That doesn’t mean you cannot use lighter roasts for espresso.
    I don’t mind medium light roasts for other brewing methods that call for medium or coarse grounds. Maybe medium grinds work better with lighter roasts. Underextraction can cause the brew to be sour, so if more surface area of a light roast is exposed to hot water, the better the extraction. Something to experiment with…

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  3. I always choose a rather fine grind for any coffee bean and adjust the amount of coffee I use according to that. It seems to me that it works out just as well doing it like that.

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  4. The grind level is more specific to the brewing method than the roast.
    French Press requires fairly coarse grid. Drip requires medium. Espresso requires fine. Turkish Coffee requires a grind that is almost powder.

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  5. Not really, although there are not, to my knowledge Coffee Grind Inspectors lurking anywhere…
    Coarse ground coffee is usually used for French Press style brewing, while a Medium grind is more amenable to Drip/Pour-over. In the Fine and Ultra-Fine we are in the Espresso/Turkish methods.
    All the items noted above…are, at best, guidelines. We have found that for our Cuisinart DCC model auto-drip machines a Medium-with-a notch-toward-fine grind is better than a straight-up Mediu…

    Victor Allen’s

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  6. I would say no. You might use a different grind setting based on bean size or method of brewing, but when it comes to preparing coffee, I like to stick with measuring beans in grams to get a consistent cup. A lighter roast will give you a lighter cup, and a darker roast a darker cup, But you should consistently use the same amount of beans and water once you’ve decided exactly How you like your coffee.

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  7. Different grind levels are used for different brewers, not roasts. Coarse for French Press, fine for pour-over, and very fine for espresso, for example.

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