Is it true that Mormons don’t drink coffee?

Is it true that Mormons don’t drink coffee?

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  1. Yes, most don’t drink coffee (or tea). This originally comes from a revelation in 1833, now printed as D&C, Section 89. Joseph Smith himself did not always keep the Word of Wisdom, nor did the majority of leaders at the time. [1]
    The introduction reads:
    “To be sent greeting; not by commandment or constraint.”
    Originally, this advice (claimed to be directly from God), was advice (a suggestion). However, now not drinking coffee and/or tea is currently a prerequisite for baptism, missionary service, attendance at church schools, and entry into the church’s temples. It is one of the biggest enforced commandments and constraints, just under murder and the law of chastity.
    The church has clearly evolved and reinterpreted this original suggestion/guideline. And such has kept countless millions from joining the church.
    Certainly, an omnipotent and omniscient loving god would not have the drinking of coffee and/or tea among his top 100 important things in order to participate in eternal saving ordinances or even entry into his church.
    I think it very likely that the church will reinterpret this in the future, making it more consistent with the originally claimed revelation. I foresee the day when the drinking of coffee and tea no longer will be a commandment and requirement (constraint) for baptism, missionary service, and entry into the church’s temples.

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  2. The short answer id that the word of wisdom prohibits the drinking of hot drinks. Since people seem to need more direction the definition was made more specific to become tea and coffee. Personally I try to avoid hot drinks, however in winter I do tend to like to have an occasional hot chocolate, probably about ten to fifteen a year.
    No specific reason has been given. It is a commandment now not when it was originally given. Some people have speculated as to why it was given. However, try immersing tour hand in coffee or tea coffee straight from the pot for ten minutes. You might get a lot of damage to your flesh. Do you think you stomach would fair any better. Your reflex would get you to pull your hand away long before that ten minutes was up. Your stomach cannot do that.

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  3. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon Church is incorrect) has a revelation received by Joseph Smith called the Word of Wisdom which talks about hot drinks (later defined as coffee and tea) saying they were not for “the body or belly” ( D&C 89:9 ). There is plenty of scientific evidence that hot tea and coffee can cause disease. For example, check out this URL ( Drinking Very Hot Tea Can Increase The Risk Of Throat Cancer ) that points out that “People are advised to wait a few minutes before drinking a cup of freshly-boiled tea today as a new study, published on the British Medical Journal website, finds that drinking very hot tea (70°C or more) can increase the risk of cancer of the oesophagus, the muscular tube that carries food from the throat to the stomach…”
    Some of us suspect that coffee and tea at any temperature will likely be found to cause some health problems someday.
    The Word of Wisdom ( D&C 89 ) starts with this advice:
    1 A Word of Wisdom, for the benefit of the council of high priests, assembled in Kirtland, and the church, and also the saints in Zion —
    2 To be sent greeting; not by commandment or constraint , but by revelation and the word of wisdom, showing forth the order and will of God in the temporal salvation of all saints in the last days —
    3 Given for a principle with promise, adapted to the capacity of the weak and the weakest of all saints , who are or can be called saints .
    For the first decades, the Word of Wisdom was considered to be inspired advice. Later, some parts were used to determine worthiness to enter the temple and some drugs have been added to the prohibitions. See:

    The above article indicates:
    In more recent times, apostles and prophets have added the use of illegal drugs and misuse of prescription medications to the list of prohibitions. The term “hot drinks” is currently officially applied to tea and coffee. Since coffee and tea both contain the stimulant caffeine, a question that sometimes is asked is whether or not the Word of Wisdom prohibits cola drinks . There is no specific prohibition on cola drinks, and this issue is left to an individual’s own discretion.
    The Word of Wisdom is a fulfillment of prophecy
    The Word of Wisdom states that it is given in part because of the “evils and designs which do and will exist in the hearts of conspiring men in the last days” ( D&C 89:4 ). Modern developments have vindicated this prophetic warning.
    The Word of Wisdom is a principle of obedience and unity
    Furthermore, the Word of Wisdom is a principle of unity, according to Brigham Young:
    So we see that almost the very first teachings the first Elders of this Church received were as to what to eat, what to drink, and how to order their natural lives, that they might be united temporally as well as spiritually. This is the great purpose which God has in view in sending to the world, by His servants, the gospel of life and salvation. It will teach us how to deal, how to act in all things, and how to live with each other to become one in the Lord.
    Throughout history God’s covenant people have frequently had indicators, or identity markers, which have separated them from the rest of the world
    Outward signs are often used to single out God’s covenant people . Such signs have included:
    circumcision ( Gen. 17:2–14 ), the Sabbath day ( Ex. 31:12–17 ), endogamy or prohibitions on marriage outside the group ( Ezra 10:3 ), greetings ( D&C 88:131-133 ), and dietary proscriptions, such as the food taboos of Leviticus or the latter-day health code of the Word of Wisdom.
    Adherence to the Word of Wisdom is often a mark of a committed Latter-day Saint and is an outward sign of their separation from the world and their participation in the fellowship of God’s covenant people. Non-observance or observance of the Word of Wisdom often reflects one’s commitment (or lack thereof) to their covenants with God as well as a possible indicator as to how one might approach other commandments.
    The final verses of D&C 89 promise:
    18 And all saints who remember to keep and do these sayings, walking in obedience to the commandments, shall receive health in their navel and marrow to their bones;
    19 And shall find wisdom and great treasures of knowledge, even hidden treasures;
    20 And shall run and not be weary, and shall walk and not faint.
    21 And I, the Lord, give unto them a promise, that the destroying angel shall pass by them, as the children of Israel, and not slay them.
    I believe the Word of Wisdom was inspired counsel for the early Saints but all scripture is subject to interpretation by prophets in our day. We have many modern advantages over the early 1800s. Just as the Word of Wisdom was updated from the dietary laws of the Law of Moses, the Word of Wisdom has been updated for modern Saints. The promises still apply but we still have agency and the words of modern prophets to help us determine how we will apply this counsel.

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  4. The early church leaders drank it. It is well documented in the Journal Of Discourses and other texts.
    It’s a modern invention of the LDS church leaders. An early LDS leader named Brigham Young had his own Brewery and fields of tea.

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  5. Joseph Smith received a revelation from God, now in the Church referred to as the “Word of Wisdom.” In it, God encouraged Church members to avoid “hot drinks.” Most likely, God was referring to distilled liquor, which burns going down, regardless of temperature. Church leaders figured God was referring to tea and coffee and so banned them. Piping hot chocolate is perfectly OK though.

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  6. Some know of the damages “caffeinated beverages” do to the body, [but with caffeine many Latter day Saints I run into like to play the “It’s not coffee” card. Fine, their choice.]
    Good Latter Day Saints will know not to put ANY harmful substances inside of them. What people see as harmful, vary. Most Latter day Saints just avoid Coffee, Alcohol, Tea and Tobacco.

    18 And all saints who remember to keep and do these sayings, walking in obedience to the commandments, shall receive health in their navel and marrow to their bones ;
    19 And shall find wisdom and great treasures of knowledge , even hidden treasures;
    20 And shall run and not be weary, and shall walk and not faint .
    21 And I, the Lord, give unto them a promise, that the destroying angel shall pass by them, as the children of Israel, and not slay them. Amen.
    D&C: 89 18-21

    Is it true that Mormons don't drink coffee?

    Source:

    Is it true that Mormons don't drink coffee?

    [For anyone who wants to argue or “correct” this… let’s just accept you read differently than I do and vice versa.] …

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  7. It’s ‘Actually we’re members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ that don’t drink coffee.
    If a Mormon says that phrase to you, they almost certainly don’t drink coffee. If they’re comfortable with ‘Mormon’, they might!

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  8. I watch quite a few vloggers from Utah and I’ve always found it interesting how they don’t drink coffee or tea supposedly for health reasons, yet they drink tons of soft drinks, eat tons of sweets and fast food, frozen fried foods and generally have not very good eating habits.

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  9. Members of the church ofJesus Christ of Latter Day Saints follow a Word of Wisdom which forbids hot drinks specifically coffee and tea. It also forbids alcohol and tobacco plus gives encouragement on what we should eat. See Word of Wisdom for more information.

    Eight O’Clock

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