Is a cup of Keurig coffee better than one from a full pot?

Is a cup of Keurig coffee better than one from a full pot?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “coffee maker better than keurig

0 thoughts on “Is a cup of Keurig coffee better than one from a full pot?”

  1. Re: “ Is a cup of Keurig coffee better than one from a full pot?
    Of all the different ways to brew coffee, Keurig machines are the absolutely best way to make tasteless colored warm water.
    There are three reasons:
    The coffee in the K-cup is pre-ground, old, and stale. You can avoid this problem by grinding your own coffee fresh and using a Keurig converter.
    The water is heated too cold (maximum 192 degrees F) to properly extract all of the oils and flavors that make coffee taste like coffee.
    The water passes through the K-cup or converter much too fast to properly extract all of the great coffee goodness that gives coffee flavor.
    A proper cup of coffee with all of its wonderful aroma and sublime flavor requires five vital ingredients:
    Fresh whole beans fresh ground;
    The right grind;
    Clean filtered water (not tap, not distilled, and not softened);
    The right temperature (195–205 F, the closer to 205 F, the better);
    The right time (about 3-4 minutes);
    Serve immediately after brewing. Consume within 20 to 30 minutes. Start by blowing gently on the leading edge and sipping lightly. Do not try to pour down your throat and definitely do not pour in your lap and then leave your clothes on.
    How to Brew “The Perfect Cup” of Coffee
    I use a French press and tea kettle for my coffee. There is no need to buy an expensive French press unless you want an insulating sleeve to keep the coffee warm. I myself use cheap Bodum presses: A 2-cup for summer and a 4-cup for winter.
    If you want a brewer with a pot that will brew coffee properly, be sure to choose one certified by the Specialty Coffee Association:
    Certified Home Brewers — Specialty Coffee Association

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  2. I have yet to have a satisfying cup in the several years since the appearnce of the Keurig single serve machines and K-cups became available. I even owned a Keurig machine, hoping that by using my own fresh, home roasted coffee in a re-useable K-cup would produce better results. It did, but still not anywhere near the quality of a good pour-over or polished infusion. The contact time is too short and the temperature is too low for the amount of coffee in the container, the grind level required, and the pressure imposed on the bed of grounds.
    A full (say, more than 2 cups minimum) pot from a typical home-style coffeemaker is marginally better, but, partly because of the sheer mass of grounds and greater surface area exposed, at least gets closer to a full extraction and generally provides a better cup—in my opinion.

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  3. While Keurig is fast and convenient, it’s not an optimal way to brew coffee when compared to other methods.
    As Jim Ree pointed out, the coffee was ground weeks or months ahead of time and sealed into the K-cup, which means that the flavor of the coffee won’t be at its peak when compared to freshly ground coffee.
    Another problem is the amount of time that the water spends in contact with the ground coffee while brewing. Keurig and regular drip coffee makers pour hot water through the grounds, which doesn’t give you good extraction and can end up with weak tasting coffee.
    Brewing temperature also matters a great deal. Too hot or too cold can wreck the flavor. The old percolators boiled water in the bottom of the pot and kept pumping heated water through the grounds, but there was virtually no control over temperature and it was hard to have any kind of consistency.
    I had a Mr Coffee machine way back when that went crazy over time and made scalding hot coffee that was a danger to anyone who tried drinking it too soon.
    Most coffee nerds I know pay very close attention to water temperature and use the pour-over method or a french press. (I heat my water to 202F to 205F and use pour-over).
    But… if coffee from a Keurig or other coffee maker tastes good to you, then awesome.

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  4. What do you like? That’s the only real question. I think the pod system makes coffee that tastes like instant coffee and so it’s not my choice. If you like it, and many do, that’s fine.

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  5. Keurig is really good coffee at best, but it’s never excellent coffee. Coffee from a full pot can definitely outdo a cup of Keurig….depending on the coffee bean and who makes it.

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  6. This question has its yes. If you make Coffee individually, it smells great, and tastes great too. When making a pot of Coffee, the effects are the same, but if you leave the pot fire on constant, your Coffee will begin to taste like mudd.

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