If Espresso beans are dark roast beans, what is the Starbucks “blonde” espresso roast?

If Espresso beans are dark roast beans, what is the Starbucks “blonde” espresso roast?

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0 thoughts on “If Espresso beans are dark roast beans, what is the Starbucks “blonde” espresso roast?”

  1. Thing about coffee is that the more you roast the beans, you gain flavor , but you burn off caffeine , so when you get the “strongest” cup of coffee, it’s actually the least caffeinated.
    Blond espresso Beans aren’t roasted as much as regular espresso beans, which means they have more caffeine and a lighter (some call it sweeter) flavor.

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  2. So I’m just going to put this video from Starbucks itself first.

    According to the video, “at second pop is where you find the sweet spot for Bonde Roast”.
    Now refer to the more common way (though according to my mentor, it’s more of a rough estimate than exact standards like units, e.g. liters… etc.)

    If Espresso beans are dark roast beans, what is the Starbucks “blonde” espresso roast?

    You can see that Full City Roast is probably where Blonde Roast is, despite them calling it “light roast”. Truth is, Starbucks has its own coffee language, and it’s brilliant at making people talk about it. Flat white? You don’t hear that elsewhere. But it’s a brilliant way to create a sticky lifestyle for consumers.
    But in reality, it’s almost at dark roast. When we talk about light to medium roast, it’s way lighter than Starbuck’s own Blonde roast.

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  3. So dark, blonde, medium roasts, those are all different levels of how the beans are roasted. Blonde is the least roasted, retaining most of the fruity, light taste of the coffee cherry itself (with the most caffeine content). Medium is obviously medium, and dark roast is the most roasted with a very “coffee” taste, but ironically relatively little caffeine.
    Espresso refers to high-pressure hot water being pressed through tightly packed (but finely ground) coffee grounds to produce a very strong, very caffeinated “shot” of espresso. Normally we use our darkly roasted espresso beans, but we also have our blonde espresso, featuring a lighter taste with slightly more caffeine.

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