I tried to roast coffee beans at home and chaff came out from each and every beans. Is it normal? What will happen to that coffee if I

I tried to roast coffee beans at home and chaff came out from each and every beans. Is it normal? What will happen to that coffee if I don’t remove the chaffs from beans and grind it to make an espresso

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  1. Totally normal. You can give a quick (and small) spray of water on the beans just before grinding them….seems to help a little….or it could be just my ‘magination, running away with me,

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  2. I roast coffee for a living, and can say with confidence that chaff is a harmless, normal, unavoidable part of the roasting process.
    You can leave the chaff alone, and include it in the grind, but there’s no reason to, its value is neutral. It adds nothing to the flavor, and doesn’t harm the flavor. it’s just a natural byproduct of roasting. The traditional thing to do is separate it.
    Easy to do, because beans are heavy, but the chaff is virtually weightless. You can use a hand-held vacuum to remove it, or blow on it, and — poof — it disperses, floating away from the roasted beans. Then of course you have to clean up the chaff, if it gets all over the floor. It’s easy to manage, one way or another. I often blow the chaff away, with my own breath, and let it drift to the trash can below. A puff of air is all it takes. Then sweep it up, if some of it misses the trash can.
    When I first started my coffee business, I used to roast outdoors. On the front porch, in a cottage behind a bed & breakfast. I didn’t have to worry about sweeping up chaff. I’d just let it float away in the breeze, into the nearby farmlands. Roasting outdoors has this advantage. The wind takes it away. Chaff is light, fluffy, and biodegradable, harmless bits of coffee seed shells, disappearing into the wind.
    When coffee seeds are exposed to high heat, chaff develops as the beans are changing shape, shedding exterior skin. As the temperature increases, roasting the coffee seeds, all kinds of changes occur, the seeds heat up, crack, moisture inside the seeds expand, the seeds caramelize, produce water-soluble oils, and literally every type of bean, from every part of the coffee-growing world, naturally produces chaff — papery crust — that most modern roasting machines capture, and separate from the roasted seeds.
    Even with modern roasting machines, some of the chaff isn’t fully segregated. Some of the remaining chaff is easy to dispense with, because what remains has risen to the top, it’s so feathery light, with just a puff of air, you can blow it off the surface of the roasted beans.
    There are many types of “home roasting” styles. I don’t know what kind you use. I assume it doesn’t offer a roasting chamber that’s designed to separate beans from chaff, so you have to do this manually.
    Either way, easy to do. Chaff mostly self-segregates, it’s just like tiny bits of fragile paper-thin shells, that blow away, leaving just the roasted coffee seeds.

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  3. The amount of chaff is dependent on how the beans were processed, a bit of it is normal though.
    Most specialised home roasting machines have mechanisms to separate the shaff/silverskin.
    It would be best for you to separate it before grinding, it can impact the grind size distribution during grinding as well as create water channelling issues during extraction.
    That said, the taste impact in the cup…

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  4. Export coffee beans are given a mild roast, that removes the tissue like envelope from the bean, and turns them from almost white, to a shade of light green! The chaff you are experiencing, is just that, the remainder of the film covering the bean!

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