I spilled gasoline on the carpet in my car after filling my gas can. What can I do to get rid of the smell?

I spilled gasoline on the carpet in my car after filling my gas can. What can I do to get rid of the smell?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “spilled coffee in car smells

0 thoughts on “I spilled gasoline on the carpet in my car after filling my gas can. What can I do to get rid of the smell?”

  1. Some very interesting and questionable answers here.
    I assume you’ve cleaned this already, as you said ‘what should I do about the smell’ not, ‘how do I clean this up?’
    Vinegar. Simple. I do not recommend baking soda or any powder in the car if there is ANY RISK AT ALL OF NOT REMOVING THE PREVIOUS FLUID. Why?
    My previous car was owned by a smoker. I went crazy cleaning it. Sprayed it with vinegar. I put baking soda on the carpet. I forgot to clean the baking soda up immediately and, i sprayed too much vinegar so it took forever to dry.
    Cleaning. Take paper towels and blot out gas. Once dry introduce liquid dish soap, warm water, and a sponge or brush. Clean. Blot with paper towels. Clean. Repeat.
    After cleaning, spray a little vinegar on the affected carpet. Roll down the windows and let it air dry. The more windows you have down, the faster it dries.
    Your car will now smell like vinegar. That’s great.
    Vinegar takes a day or two for the smell to go away. Vinegar absorbs smells.
    Keep this in mind with foul odors.
    After a few days, when your car smells normal a…

    Reply
  2. Try placing charcoal briquettes for a bar ba que grill in a old sock . Then placing over the area where the spilt gasoline is located.The sock is to keep the charcoal from marking your carpet. Cover the charcoal socks or if you use other fabric with a heavy towel confining the odor for the absorption . Reducing the smell in to car while it absorpting . The more charcoal the quicker the absorption will be ! Check it every few days . The thinner the sock or fabric . The easier it will be for the charcoal to absorp the smell. You could try laying new paper on the carpet to place charcoal on Place briquettes one at a time don’t pour from bag not to pour powered charcoal out ! Cover with more newspaper and a towel. Mind the charcoal power on the paper when removing paper from carpet! Charcoal in a sock put in a smelly shoes reduces the smell in a shoe as well.After use return charcoal to bag for later use grilling .

    Reply
  3. Gasoline vapors can be dangerous to breathe so you want to clean this up really well…
    Fortunately, gasoline will almost completely evaporate fairly quickly in warm temperatures, leaving an oily residue which can be cut with dish soap.
    You’ve probably already opened the windows but do whatever you can to get a lot of air through the car and allow the gas to evaporate. Then since it’s the carpet, use Dawn to cut the leftover stain and carefully lift it up. You can scrub a bit but don’t push the stain into the carpet. It should come clean.
    Hit it with a bit of Febreze and you should be good to go.

    Reply
  4. Thanks for the A2A.
    By now, the gasoline spill went all the way down to the carpet padding. The volatile components of it will evaporate over time, but the rest will have to be dealt with.
    And here’s how.
    You need to start by thoroughly cleaning the area first. (For detailed instructions on how to clean the interior of your car, you can check out this step-by-step guide [ https://cleanmycar.ca/blog/how-to-clean-the-interior-of-your-car-in-3-simple-steps ].)
    First step is vacuuming.
    Use a shop vac if you got one, not your house vacuum. You don’t want your house vacuum to reek of gasoline for months.
    If you don’t have your own vacuum, head over to your local self-serve car wash or gas station, and use their high-suction vacuums. Don’t worry, you’re not going to harm them in any way.
    Next, using an all-purpose cleaner or a dedicated carpet cleaner (such as Folex), spray the area generously. Use a rag or microfiber towel to scrub and mop up the residue.

    I spilled gasoline on the carpet in my car after filling my gas can. What can I do to get rid of the smell?

    Repeat a few times to make sure you got as much out as possible.
    Leave it to air dry for half an hour.
    Next, sprinkle a little bit of baking soda on the area, and leave it overnight. It will absorb the odour.

    I spilled gasoline on the carpet in my car after filling my gas can. What can I do to get rid of the smell?

    The following day, vacuum thoroughly to rem…

    Reply
  5. A mixture of white vinegar and baking soda can help. Vacuum the carpet very well first to get all liquid out if any remains. Mix the solution so it’s thick like a paste then add just a little more vinegar and spread the paste all over the area. Let it sit till it dries and vacuum it off. Can repeat several times. It’s doubtful the gas smell will fully disappear but this will help. Gas can be difficult to remove and might require new carpeting.

    Reply
  6. Try a strong mix of white vinegar and Dawn dish soap with an carpet cleaner. Rinse and repeat. Good luck. And get a better gas can.

    Reply
  7. First clean the carpet with a good upholstery cleaner and dry thoughly with towels,,then:Try baking soda,or if you haven’t any then try ground coffee. With both cover the spill completely and rub in lightly. Let stand for at least an hour then vacuum.

    Reply
  8. Not to alarm you. But those fumes and residue might be ignited, even after you can’t smell them yourself. All it might take is a spark from something, as simple as two fabrics rubbing together. So I would have them professionally cleaned. You don’t want to take chances with such a possible volatile situation.

    Reply
  9. The solution is pretty easy, first you’ll have to remove the carpet of your car make it dry, you’ll also have to rent a specially designed vacuum cleaner in which electric components are isolated from the rest of the device, with some dedicated products you’ll have to clean it manually and then to vacuum it like any others carpets.

    Reply
  10. Scrub the carpet with some Tri Sodium Phospate cleanser, about a table spoon in a gallon of water, rinse, let dry, then scrub with a vinegar/water mix to cut the gas smell. The cleanser will take out the petroleum residue, and some of the smell, then the vinegar/water to get the remainder of the smell, then maybe do all the carpet in the car with a scented cleaner. Might have to do the vinegar/water A couple of times. Hope this helps .

    Reply
  11. Use a degreaser on it. e.g. waterless hand cleaner. This will bind up part of the volatile organics in a form that will be removable with detergent.
    Shampoo the carpet.
    Let dry with windows open on a hot day. (let the residual volatile organics just evaporate)
    If the smell isn’t gone, get some lysol concentrate (not the johnny come lately variations, get the original) Wash the carpet again and you will find the smell is gone.
    …. Opinion: A “Little Green Machine” is excellent for doing automotive upholstery and carpet.
    BISSELL Little Green Portable Spot and Stain Cleaner, 1400M – Walmart.com
    Lysol Original Scent Concentrated Disinfectant 12 oz. Liquid

    Reply
  12. First off, get that car wide open so all sorts of air can blow through it. If you have it, a stand fan blowing in one side of the car will help a great deal. Assuming you sopped up all the standing puddles before they soaked down through that floor man, it should be dry and nearly odor free in under an hour. Once you get the fumes out, use Dawn dish soap, or another one such as Palmolive to scrub that carpeting, rinse and air dry again. That should eliminate any odors, or explosion hazard.

    Reply
  13. Get some coffee, sprinkle it over the spill area then close the car for a couple hours. Vaccum the carpet and the gas smell will be gone. Might smell like coffee for a while but that will soon dissipate.

    Reply
  14. Basically it’s the “oil residue” after the gasoline has vapourised…in order to lift the remaining “residue” try using “ether” (careful as it ignites and try containing your breathing…i.e. don’t take deep breaths when applying and make sure all the doors and windows are opened) don’t smoke when you are using it. Test a small part to check for discolouring…dry clean (process of just using the foam to brush off …use a perfumed detergent) vacuum after. There are other chemicals you may use…chlorine, hydrogen peroxide and safest is the dish washing detergent. E&OE…best of luck.

    Reply
  15. I had to use activated charcoal after going to fast around a corner and my gas can tipping over in the trunk of my car. It took awhile to go away. But the charcoal absorbed it.

    Reply
  16. I would think carpet cleaner, Simple Green, or Goop hand cleaner. The Simple Green strong smell will go away after a while but it should trump the gasoline smell.

    Reply
  17. Roll your windows down and park in a sunny spot all day, and let the heat drive any volitile organic compounds (VOC) out to the atmosphere. You must pull back the carpet and any padding and let any trapped vapors escape. I then would soak the padding and carpet with clear water and immediately suck up the water with a shop vac. The water displaces Gasoline and any dried residue will rinse off. Continue air-drying until all the moisture is gone.

    Reply
  18. After doing some research, I found this article that explains a few different ways to get rid of gasoline.
    How to Get Rid of Gasoline Smell – 3 Ways – Bob Vila

    Reply
  19. You’re going to have to replace that carpet. The fuel has likely soaked all the way through the carpet and pooled underneath the spot. The smell will fade eventually, but it will not go away for a while.
    I remember loading a car with steer manure back in 1998. I asked the guy if he was sure he wanted to do that. I told him the drive home would be intolerable. He drove an suv, so the rear area was open to the rest of the vehicle. It was an extremely warm day, topping out in the high 90’s. He said yes. The next year I happened to help him loading more steer manure. Before I even opened the door, I could smell the manure from last year still strong in the vehicle. This time he laid plastic down to protect the carpet, but it was too little too late. The only thing he could do was tear it all out and start new.

    Reply
  20. Flush with water and dish washing liquid then blot semi dry. Then, rub a little Noxema into the spot where the gasoline is and allow to sit for 5–10 minutes. Flush with clean warm water and dry. Repeat if necessary. The Noxema will help break up the oily film of the gasoline.

    Reply
  21. Unfortunately, no. Only time. Try to soak up as much as you can. If possible, lift the carpet and wash with a damp towel. If it’s a large spill, try using cat litter.

    Reply
  22. Well this could run from not too hard to a real bitch.
    This will depend on how much was spilled and if it is just on the fibers of the carpet or if it soaked into underlayment.
    If it was just a splash your best bet is to have a detail company scrub the carb and then use an ozone generator to get rid of the balance of any smell. You can scrub the carpet yourself but likely there will be a residual smell.
    If it got into the underlayment you will need to remove the carpet and underlayment and assess the situation. If the underlayment is porous like jute or some foams it will have to be replaced. The carpet may be cleanable.

    Reply
  23. If the smell of gasoline is lingering in your carpet, you will want to be careful about what you use to clean it up. The best thing to do is to gather two mixing bowls, a few clean rags, hot water, baking soda, a wet/dry vacuum, and vinegar.
    Use one rag to soak up any residual liquid in the area where the spill occurred. Then, in one bowl, mix a little hot water with vinegar, and in the other bowl, mix hot water with baking soda into a paste-like consistency.
    Apply the vinegar and water solution to the area of the carpet that has the odor on it. Use the vacuum or a rag to soak and clean up the affected area. Then cover the area with the baking soda and water mixture. Use the vacuum or a rag again to wipe off and clean the spot. Then use hot water to clean the area and allow it to dry freely….directly from DIY website

    Peet’s

    Reply
  24. Pour a big box of baking soda over the spill to absorb the gasoline and roll the windows down ! After a couple hours vacuum up the baking soda making sure the gasoline is absorbed. then reapply more baking soda then vacuum up again and then follow up with a few sprays of Febreze! That should do it . Good luck

    Reply
  25. Easiest way is to park the car in the sun with Windows open that should kill off any bacteria and or smells…and if the smell still persists go to Walmart and buy a can of ozium…it should take care of the problem…the way I use it is I spay it in the car or truck… close the windows and run the Air condition on full for half hour I used to light up once in a blue moon before I started driving or better yet became a CMD… try this before all the others it’s only about 6 bucks…so not that expensive…if doesn’t work then you can try all the mumbo jumbo others have stated…
    As a side note if your plastic containers have any spots on them wash them and again place in direct sunlight.
    Good luck.

    I spilled gasoline on the carpet in my car after filling my gas can. What can I do to get rid of the smell?

    Reply
  26. Buy some Activated Charcoal from an Aquarium/Pet Store and mix it with a packet of Bicarbonate of Soda. Put that mix in a porous cloth bag (eg pillowcase) and cover the entire spilled area. It will absorb the odors over a period of a few days.
    If you spilled more than 100ml/3oz then you will need t have the carpet steamed cleaned first.

    Reply
  27. Open the windows and get plenty of fresh air in the car. The smell will go away in time.
    I learned to put a removable pad in the trunk of my car, when I transport gasoline. Any spill fills the whole car. However, fresh air quickly takes it away.

    Reply
  28. These days I deal with smells with ozone. Close up the car with the ozone generator set for 30–60 minutes, do not open the car for at least 30 minutes after the timer runs out and smell gone.

    Reply
  29. Along with the suggestions that are already on your question site, try opening the windows on your car and let it air out as much as possible . Normal Ozone on a sunny day will help along with the breeze and fresh air.

    Reply
  30. Good luck. Try baking soda, then carpet cleaner a day later. Leave your Windows slightly open it not raining. I think I have done this myself about a hundred times. There will always be a faint HC odar inside unless you clean it well.

    Reply
  31. Clean with baking soda.Just sprinkle on and vacuum up after a few minutes.If that doesnt work,use toothpaste with baking soda diluted with water. Rinse thoroughly and dry with hair dryer or place towels to soak up water. Leave towel in place until completely dry.

    Reply
  32. I would start with baking soda and water. Put baking soda on the spot, spritz a bit of water on it and scrub it into the carpet, let it dry, then vacuum and brush it out.
    If that doesn’t work, there’s a plethora of carpet cleaning chemicals in handy spray cans that should do the trick. Just follow the directions on the can.

    Reply
  33. Hmmmmm. Good question. The only thing I could suggest might be a mild detergent, warm water and a scrubbing brush. I know common bathroom soap removes the smell of fuel from my hands.
    Perhaps laying a folded newspaper with a weight on it after washing would draw the residual moisture out.

    Reply
  34. Pull out the carpet. They usually use contact cement. Replace as needed. No easy answer. RESPECTFULLY CRAIG ANDERSON ☮️ NEVADA USA

    Reply
  35. I’m surprised that no-one has mentioned floor grommets. All vehicles have holes punched into the floorpan:

    I spilled gasoline on the carpet in my car after filling my gas can. What can I do to get rid of the smell?

    Something like this.
    And a rubber grommet in each hole:

    I spilled gasoline on the carpet in my car after filling my gas can. What can I do to get rid of the smell?

    Prize out the grommet with a screwdriver, and pour hot soapy detergent water on the affected carpet. The contaminated water will take the path of least resistance, which is the nearest drain hole. Repeat every day until the smell goes.
    Once it’s all clean and dry replace the grommet.
    Do I win a prize?
    Pics borrowed from google..

    Reply
  36. This is quite a difficult task.
    You could try washing the carpet……..
    I would wait a couple of weeks as the gasoline will slowly evaporate and the smell will be less………
    I would not try any deodorant or smelly stuff as this frequently makes it worse .
    Just be patient
    That would be my advise

    Reply
  37. If you can’t remove it for washing, then cover the stained area with activated carbon, then seal it with a plastic sheet for several days. The carbon should adsorb away the vapors. Vaccum it up once there’s no more smell and discard of it properly

    Reply
  38. The only real way is to allow the gas to vapourize or gas off. You can add a space freshener but the gas vapours need to be exhausted. This time of year it can be difficult since gas vapourizes better at elevated temperatures like room temp.
    Using any kind of heat source can be fatal since gas vapours are quite explosive so moving air thru the car would be the best bet. A fan from outside to blow air thru the car should work if the weather is warmer.

    Reply
  39. How much spilled? A small dribble? Or did it get soaked? If you are talking about a dribble leave the windows down as much as you can and after a while it will go away.But if it got drenched the problem is that the gasoline has soaked into the carpet pad beneath the carpet. Then the only way to get rid of the stench of raw gasoline forever is to replace the carpet and the pad.
    It might “air out” a bit in the beginning but, it will always be rejuvenated when the car sits in the hot sun with the windows up.
    Gasoline vapor is not a healthy thing to be breathing. The vapors will do you harm.

    Reply
  40. I would replace the carpet. After removing the old carpet, do a good job of cleaning the deck. There are molded replacement carpet kits for many model cars. Google , or Bing replacement carpet for your make and model car.
    If you are handy with tools, it is an easy task to remove seats. The biggest safety hazard would be accidentally triggering air bags. If you are unsure about yourself, but the carpet kit and take your car to a mechanic.

    Reply
  41. Take out the carpet out and hang it outside. Best would be that you let it get wet in rain and dry in sun. If you’re in a hurry, there are lots of carpet shampoo products.

    Reply
  42. Man, open your windows on a good hot day and let it air cause you can try to clean it with carpet cleaner and that will help but it will still probably need serious airing out.

    Reply
  43. Wash out area with a natural orange based oil soap. Then spray a [1^] natural scent of cinnamon or other natural oil scent you may prefer.
    If the odor persist there are other options.
    If its a trunk or rear cab Mat, air it out of the vehicle for a month or chuck it out if the odor persists.
    You may have to replace a portion of the carpet or cut the bad section and place a oversized Mat over the cut out. Gas odors/fumes are very aromatic and get into soft materials e.g, headliner seat covers, foam. Putting a air ionizer once in a while in a closed car may help and airing out once in a while.
    There is also a French alcohol catalytic lamp that removes odors. It does take a few treatments. you can buy them used or new. It gets rid of many odors in large and small areas from smoke, pet, mildew etc.
    [1^ ] The burning fuel releases molecules (negatively charged ions) into the air that capture and destroy impurities, resulting in purified air. In just 25-40 minutes.
    [1^] . Newsletter Additional Info about catalytic lamps
    Lampe Berger Fragrance Oil Lamp Cube Blue NIB | eBay
    Florida’s Largest Lampe Berger Retailer now Sells Online
    Use only lamp Berger alcohol oil or 90% rubbing alcohol for fuel. Once lit the lamp burns with out a flame emitting negatively charged ions.
    I have used commercial sprays in flooded vehicles some of those scents are very offending to human smell. Naturals oils is diluted 2 to 4 percent maximum that’s 2 to 4 drops to one hundred as a general spray for many surfaces.
    Lavender, lemongrass (citronella) essential oils are antibacterial and aromatic there are many others.

    Reply
  44. About all you can do is allow it to literally air out. You must wait until the gas has dried up, then you could try washing it up. Good luck.

    Reply
  45. If you use a carpet cleaner and a deodorizer it will remove most of it but g as s dissipates more quickly than many other things and the smell will be hardly noticeable after a week, especially if you leave the trunk open and let it air out.

    Reply
  46. A buddy just went through this.
    He mixed up rubbing alcohol and lemon dish soap in a bucket and completely saturated the area, scrubbing with a mop and brush. You have to get down to the under pad. If you can remove molding and lift some of the carpet out, clean from both sides. He did this twice, a week apart, with leaving his windows open as much as possible during that see. First cleaning took the bulk of it out. Its now been 3 weeks and smells normal… But it took all of the three weeks to get the lingering smell out.

    Eight O’Clock

    Reply
  47. I would go to a gas station, use one of their vaccumesfor car cleaning suck whatever you can out of the gas spilled area then get some carpet cleaner and hand scrub…the smell will go away with time, but. This should help speed up the process! Good luck

    Dunkin’

    Reply
  48. I would suggest shampooing your carpet with a rental shampooer, one with an upholstery attachment, if you don’t have one, using Simple Green. My partner used is in our semi truck, he has spilled diesel in it a few times, the Simple Green works really well and it’s environmentally safe. I have used it to spot clean a couch before, it got all the diesel smell out. I did that with the spray and a scrubber and a towel to blot it up. Worked great

    Reply

  49. Reply
  50. It goes away and evaporates. It may have as long as I took to answer your question. Sorry about that. Driving with the windows open for a bit may help. If you still smell gasoline after that, we could have used you before legalizing marijuana.

    Reply
  51. Put an ionizer air cleaner inside your car with the door closed and have that on for awhile. See how does does and if anything more then get a good carpet cleaner and scrub brush to try to fight it like a stain. Otherwise one of those rental units that washes and cleans suction vacums could do the trick.

    Reply
  52. You would have to extract your carpet. In other words… wash with soap and extract the carpet with a carpet extractor. Rinse and extract a bunch of times. Thats a horrible smell by the way.

    Reply
  53. Spray the area with some kind of degreaser or carpet cleaner go to a car wash that has a carpet shampooer and clean the area after carpet dries sprinkle baking soda over area and leave it down, oh ya leave windows down though process & after as much as you can

    Reply
  54. Don’t worry about smell. Worry about explosive situation. Those fumes will explode if right situation. Leave all doors open and try to clean with a non explosive agent. You will have to contact the fire department as to exactly what to do. You see gasoline is explosive in fume or liquid form. Many years ago in Criminal justice course we studied all of this. Hate to be harsh but sometime workers will leave rags in house cleaning paint and they explode overnight and whole house goes up.

    Reply
  55. Auto carpet from the factory is simply laid in. It may be possible to unbolt the seats, etc, remove it and squirt it down with fabreeze and air it in the sun a day or two.
    If that is too complicated my next suggestion is to take a day off, soak down the area with fabreeze, open all the windows, and let her sit. If that doesn’t work I’m afraid it’s time for new carpet

    Reply
  56. Baking soda and club soda. A lot of carpet fresh and a ton of paper towels, dare I ask how petról got spilled on the carpet, or, how about I just not ask.

    Reply
  57. If you can take the carpet out, get it in full sun and soap wash it a few times. With a fixed carpet sprinkle bicarbonate of soda and brush it in, vacuum it out, repeat several times, and air the car as much as possible as warm as possible. Shampoo also helps. Time will get it out as the aromatic oils and volatile oils sweat out.

    Reply
  58. Soak the carpet with rug shampoo and use a scrub brush to clean the area. Use a wet/dry vacuum to remove the mixture. Wash the area twice and vacuum twice. Leave the door open to air dry. After the area is dry spread ”kitty litter” on the carpet and let it be on the carpet for a day or two, then vacuum this out and the odor should be mostly removed.

    Reply
  59. Time and fresh air….I bought a 2001 check y Blazer years ago, the owner had a gas can turn over in the back…they kept dryer sheets hidden through the vehicle to try and mask the smell…didn’t work too well when it got hot outside .. active charcoal and baking soda can help remove the smell faster…sprinkle some of the baking soda on the carpet and keep an open box of atm and hammer in the back…swap it out once in awhile…and keep windows down when you can..

    Reply
  60. Absorb as much as possible with disposable paper towels, then leave those paper towels to air-dry outside.
    Leave the car windows open until the area is good and dry.
    Then use some thing like 409 spray cleaner and a cleaning clorh. Allow to dry with the windows open. If you give it a good 409 scrub the first time, that should take care of it, but repeat as needed till the odor is gone.

    Reply
  61. Either pay to have the car detailed and point out the specific area to clean it or try renting a steam cleaner from Home Depot or wherever and try deep cleaning it yourself.
    another thought is to drench the affected are in rubbing alcohol and then following that up with some of that industrial strength febreeze.

    Reply
  62. I would saturate it with starting fluid (use in a VERY WELL VENTILATED AREA) than I would wash it thoroughly with soap water and let it sit for a day or two outside. I would than fabreze it and than put it back into your car

    Reply
  63. Fresh coffee grounds. Cover the area of the spill in at least 1/2″ of fresh ground coffee. I recommend covering the surrounding area as well. Leave these fresh coffee grounds in place in your carpeting/upholstery for at least a week. During that time, keep your car windows cracked for adequate ventilation day and night if at all possible. Then, vacuum all the coffee grounds out after a week. Apply some carpet freshening powder to the area and surrounding upholstery and vacuum again. At that point the gasoline smell will be gone for good.

    Reply
  64. I’d clean up the mess with dish detergent or a white vinegar solution. I’d likely do this using a carpet cleaner AFTER letting the gasoline dry and evaporate.
    Depending on the spill, I may elect to remove the carpets and clean them. This would allow me to wipe down the floor panels.
    Gasoline is a petroleum product and can leave an oily residue on carpets and clothing. It’s not something you can see with your eyes so your technique must be thorough remove that residue.
    If it was just a few drops, then I’d probably wipe it down with a damp cloth and let it air-dry.

    Reply
  65. Murphy’s oil soap, the stuff for hardwood floors. If you read the back you’ll see it’s also safe for nearly every part of a car aside from paint, glass and clear plastic screens or covers. Great for leather and just about everything else. Soak the area down with the recommended mixture let it sit for a bit then vacuum it up and you’ll never know it was there. Use it in the shop every day for greasy finger prints on seats and door panels.

    Reply
  66. I am not sure this would work, but it has worked for me in other situations. Cat urine/spray, a young grandson soaking my love seat with urine during an overnight stay, and spilling a half gallon of raw cows milk into the passenger seat of my car.
    Go to a pet store and get a couple of gallons of the cat/dog pee remover fluid. Get the best one they have which is usually the most expensive. It seems to remove all stains and odors.
    When I spilled the milk, I thought, OMG, when spring comes and this car warms up it’s going to smell so rotten/sour in here. I immediately, poured a whole gallon of the “cat/dog pee” cleaner into the upolstery, scrubbed it into the fabric, and so far, no problem. (That was 6 months ago.) I detect no smell of sour milk.
    I have done this with the peed on couch also, and it came out perfect.
    I am not sure it would work with Gasoline smell, but it’s worth a try.

    Reply
  67. Well, as you know gasoline is very volatile and evaporates quickly. Then you are left with a greasy mess that you can clean up with Simple Green or similar degreaser. The problem is often that the spill has gone through the carpet and into the insulation beneath it. You may have to pull the carpet up and repeat the cleaning process. After that the smell will dissipate with time.

    Reply
  68. You need to remove the oil particles of the fuel that are left after evaporation. A good degreaser such as simple green may work. If you can pull up the carpet apply it there too. Vacuum very well and let dry. The odor may have also carried to your AC. If so simply spray a mild solution of deodorizer into the air intake while it’s running.

    Reply
  69. You can try Kitty Litter (often used to soak up motor oil spills on garage floors): it’s very odor-absorbing, given its original purpose. Otherwise, time and exposure to fresh air; that’s about all I can think of.

    Reply
  70. Neil, bless you! That stuff is nasty to deal with! This is going to sound strange but where the gas was spilled is going to be oily. If you have a Dollar Store near you or even a Walmart go to the pet section and depending on how much was spilled, or the area that needs coverage, pick up some kitty litter. It absorbs the liquid and can actually help with the smell.
    Sprinkle it around until the area is covered. Then let it work. Leave the windows and trunk open so the air can circulate. Then either use a Shopvac to vacuum the litter up or take it to the nearest car wash to vacuum it out. It’s not easy because that stuff will be heavy.
    Just make sure you have removed all of the litter.
    To keep that from happening again. In the pet department, there are pet pads that are very absorbent. They turn liquid into gel. Put those onto the floor of your car before you set your gas cans, or anything else, in and they keep it off your carpet.

    Reply
  71. Well as many have said the actual as has obviously evaporated but the smell is still there. Here is what we used in our used cars when they had aroma issues. One is if your a coffee drinker, take your favorite coffee beans, “new not used” and pour about 2 cups into a tupper ware bowl with a lid poke numerous holes in the lid and put this bowl in the back floorboard or under a seat for 4 or 5 days. works better when its warm days. The coffee grounds will absorb the smell and leave you a hint of the coffee smell in the car. If your not a coffee drinker, take 2 fresh apples and slice them into about 6 pieces each same thing with the bowl and lid. takes about 5 days with the apples. make sure the holes in the lids are numerous because the more air flow with the coffee or the apples the better.

    Reply
  72. Remove the carpet and underlay/sound proofing, give them a thorough cleaning and hang them out to dry for a day before refitting. And leave the doors open all the while to allow any residual fuel to evaporate.

    Reply
  73. While there are several deodorizers that may help, first I would suggest allowing as much as possible to evaporate, even to the point of using a small fan blowing across the carpet to facilitate the evaporative process. If your trunk has a thick carpet and pad, you may consider removing it, and cleaning the actual metal of the vehicle with Dawn dish washing liquid and water. Then after allowing a day, or several days for the carpet and pad to air out, giving it the sniff test before putting it back into the trunk.

    Reply
  74. I would trade the car in on another. Once while driving across the Arizona desert, we stopped for gas. The car ahead at the pumps had his driver door open. The fuel nozzle jumped out and sprayed the inside of his car with (leaded) gasoline. Car is never good again unless you can get it down to
    Houston before a hurricane

    Reply
  75. I would take the vehicle to a detail shop and let them work getting the spill gasoline out of your car carpet. And remember don’t smoke and drive on your way there. Good luck to you. And you always have insurance, cop., to pay for the car if it catches on fire.

    Reply
  76. I would put cat litter on it…changing it every other day. This will draw the gas out of the rug. After it is dry I’d say some basic room deodorant because any strong chemicals might mix with the gas and be dangerous. Good luck

    Reply
  77. To truly get the smell completely out you need to get someone to cut the piece out and replace it.
    If the carpet is not old and worn they can blend it fairly easily and you will never know it’s a new piece
    There is no way to completely fix the problem without replacement.

    Reply
  78. You’re gonna need to get the professionals onto it…
    No matter what you do to clean it, you’ll need the powerful tools to suck the gas and the chemicals you use to treat it back out of the carpet.

    Reply
  79. My answer is different than every other I read.
    It’s painful to read 50+ answers with so many saying things like “you must ” replace the carpet, and “the only way…”, and even an engineer saying ‘No solution – only time’ . Most of the answers gave instructions on masking or reducing the odors, rather than eliminating them.
    Now I will be guilty of an “only”…
    Gasoline odors can only mean one thing, and that is that volatile toxic petroleum residue still exists in the vehicle. You don’t want to mask those – for health and safety reasons your goal should be to eliminate that pollutant at the source. Otherwise, it can come right back on the next hot day.
    One highly effective way of eliminating the gasoline residuals is using natural microbes which eat petroleum – they metabolize it at the molecular level. Certain types of archaea and bacteria, for example, quickly consume the short-chain molecules of gasoline and leave behind harmless byproducts.
    Gasoline has a very low viscosity and will easily penetrate the smallest pores, nooks and crevices of your vehicle and its furnishings (carpets, trim, etc). Ideally, your cleaning method follows those same pathways to access all of the areas the gasoline contaminated – otherwise, you are not effectively eliminating the source of the fumes and odors.
    The cool trick is that the archaea are microscopic and can follow the same pathways the gasoline did in the first place. So if gasoline is soaked into the pores of the concrete in your garage, the microbes will follow. If gasoline is in the microscopic pores of your vehicle’s carpet and carpet pad, the gasoline-eating archaea can get to every last molecule and consume it.
    Picture this: Take a brand-new 100-unit college dormitory building, and distribute 1,000 bite-sized brownies, hot out of the oven, and placed in every room in the building. Then tell the incoming freshman class that they get $1 for each brownie they find, plus they get to eat the brownies. Within the hour, you would have shelled out $1,000 cash to smiling faces with a building now devoid of brownies.

    The difference is the archaea do it at the molecular level, and leave no crumbs or gasoline molecules behind.
    Over time, more biomimetic consumer products will start using different types of helpful microbes such as the petroleum-eating-archaea offered in Akaya’s 100%-natural consortium. Other manufacturers offer their own microbial strains and combinations, so this is intended as a PSA not a sales pitch.
    Next Gen Sequencing is advancing science’s understanding of the who, what, why, how and where of microbial activity and how it can be harnessed to achieve people’s goals.
    And I, for one, will be saving my coffee beans for a higher and better use.

    Victor Allen’s

    Reply
  80. The best thing to do as I have had to clean that type of mess before is to just keep flushing water through it and extract it over and over again. You will have to peel up the carpet and do the previous process I stated above to the jute. The jute will be the hardest part to clean. The cleaner I would recommend is a product from a company called Optimum Polymer Technologies. The product is Carlet and Fabric cleaner. But this process quite long as it toke the two of us cleaning the mess about an hour. But it does get rid of the smell and feel of gasoline in the carpet.

    Reply
  81. Gasoline is highly volatile, which means it turns to vapor easily. Roll all the windows down, and leave the car outdoors for the vapor to evaporate into the open air. It’s hard to say how long it will take, it depends on how much you spilled. Next time, fill the can outside of the car, and don’t fill it up so high to allow for sloshing on the way home, then fix the spigot plug if you have one (sometimes it’s missing). If you can still smell the gas when you use the car again, leave the window down a bit while you’re driving.

    Reply
  82. Open the windows, and set the car in a sunny place. A car park, for example.
    Unfortunately, it makes the vehicle a target for thieves .

    Reply
  83. You are just going to have to wait it out. The smell will go away in due time. In the mean time, keep the windows open and if you have to close them, use scented air freshener.

    Reply
  84. Air out the car. Leave the doors open. Quicker is to remove and air out the carpet. Washing may help, but could spread the smell. In any event you’ll have to dry the carpet.

    Reply
  85. Don’t know if you can….gasoline is like perfume the smell comes from the evaporation of it and it dries quickly….you can try wet baking soda that is baking soda water made into a paste rub it on the spill spot well let dry and then vacuum it up I hope this helps.

    Reply
  86. Light it with a match and the smell will be gone immediately. The gas will evaporate with almost no smell in a few hours if you leave the windows down. Or you can pour baking soda on the carpet and when its dry, vacuum it up.

    Reply
  87. I have done the very same thing, wipe as much up as possible, throw whatever you used to wipe it up into an open container. The smell will eventually go away, but, please do NOT use any type of spray around it until all the smell has eve-operated

    Reply
  88. Be very careful! It would be tempting to run the carpet through a washing machine, but that could be dangerous. Gasoline fumes from the carpet could ignite thereby producing results which I’m sure you’d prefer to avoid.
    Try putting the carpet outside in direct sunlight for a couple days. If that doesn’t work, lay it out on your driveway, saturate it with a strong detergent solution, then rinse it with a hose. If that doesn’t work, it may be that you cannot get rid of the odor, you may just have to replace it.

    Reply
  89. Oh my. I hope it was not much. I really do not know beyond replacing the carpets. Maybe open windows, a large fan, and a ton of charcoal briquettes?

    Reply
  90. Sidenote: I seriously hope your can leaked, rather than you dripping while fililng it inside the car; that can cause sparks and set off a gasoline fire!
    Baking soda should soak up a lot of the issue, via sprinkleing it on the area then sucking it out via shopvac repeatedly.
    But if it persists, you may have to remove the carpet and check to see if you melted anything solventable under it.
    If it’s not persisting, keeping the car warm and ventilated can also help remove volitiles from the carpet.
    Other than that, a detail shop may be a good place to go to have it professionally taken care of, as i’d imagine it’s not an uncommon problem, and one is unsure of ones capacity to dump a box or two of baking soda on the carpet and get it all back out.

    Reply
  91. After it is fully dry, scrub with a mixture of baking soda and white vinegar and water. Scrub hard and use a lot of it. Seems to cut the smell very well

    Reply
  92. Because gasoline is volatile (i.e. it evaporates easily) try to as much as possible leave your car doors or at least your car windows open as much as possible. It should get rid of the smell within a few days.
    If that doesn’t work, find a product with activated charcoal. It’s meant to absorb bad odors.

    Reply
  93. Much of the smell will come out with carpet shampoo. Rinse it well and remove excess water with a wet vac. A dry powder sprinkle may help absorb any remaining odor and then dry vac.

    Reply
  94. Open up all the windows and let as much gasoline evaporate as possible. You may try to absorb some of the remainder with talc powder or try hydrogen peroxide but I do not think there is much that can outdo gasoline.

    Reply
  95. All you can do is let it evaporate in a warm atmosphere.
    Keep anything and everything mechanical or electronic well away from the petrol fumes as any tiny spark can and will ignite petrol fumes.
    I leave you to imagine the consequences of the resulting fire.
    Petrol Fumes And Fire

    Reply
  96. Get some liquid Tide. Pour on gasoline spot. Let sit and soak overnight. Then scrub with warm water. Vacuum with a wet shop vacuum, or if you have a Kirby vacuum use the shampoo attachment. If you don’t have either types of vacuum cleaners, go down to your local hardware store and rent a carpet cleaner machine. Liquid Tide works wonders. Also great for oil and grease spot removal on garage floors and driveways. Be sure to let the liquid Tide settle in and work for several hours before washing away.

    Reply
  97. The more volatile parts of the gasoline have evaporated likely leaving behind a less volatile but still smelly material. I would try to leave the car as open as possible and direct a fan at the offending spot in hopes that the continuous air flow for several hours would evaporate and carry away the offending odor.
    If such is not sufficiently effective, you will need to get the carpet loose and remove the non woven padding that is contaminated. You might be able to wash it in a bucket of water with strong detergent. Then dry and reuse it; or you might have to replace it. The same is true of the top layer carpet itself. Hopefully washing it and using something like a wet pickup Shop-Vac® to remove the liquid should suffice.
    Good luck.

    Reply
  98. Next time when you fill up those gas cans, do them outside on the ground and not inside. You’ll have better control of spillage and less chance of starting a fire.

    Reply
  99. Sadly gas is pne of the strongest and most danderous smells/chemicals to have in a car. Open the windows and run the heater to evaporate it. You can try to shampoo it but it just usually spreads it. Evaporation is the key. Sunshine and/or heat are key. Do not drive until the smell is gone and do not smoke in or near it.

    Reply
  100. I just had this happen to me recently. Our wise mechanic said buy a bag of coffee beans and spread it on the spill . The beans are dry and absorb the gas and the odor . I left the beans in the back of my van on the spill about a week . No smell left at all ! It only took about 2 days . I was and am amazed at this simple trick .

    Reply
  101. Striking a fire would not give a desired effect, so wash it out with gloves, water, a huge sponge or two would be the way I would go.

    Reply
  102. Three things to do.
    Open a window and let the petrol evaporate.
    Use a detergent on the effected carpet. Make a lather and scrub the carpet.
    Buy a good smelly air freshener.

    Reply
  103. Light a match.
    NO – DON’T DO THAT! JUST KIDDING!
    Roll down all the windows; those volatile compounds will disperse soon enough. If it’s not fast enough to suit you, think about investing in one of those little cardboard pine trees to hang from your rear view mirror.

    Reply
  104. scrub the carpet with soap, open the windows and air it out, you might try this Odor Eliminator Spray Blocker it works on many things .

    Reply
  105. Look up SCOE 10X. This is the ultimate odor remover. Cat pee? Cigarette smoke? Vomit? Skunk and gasoline odor. Unbelievable stuff. Mix correctly and follow the directions! You will love me!

    Reply
  106. Let the car with doors open in garage during the nights. Let the car in sun with the windows open. The smell will go away in few weeks.

    Reply
  107. Open the windows and let it evaporate. After a week or so you can use upholstery cleaner to help remove the residual odor. Time is the key.

    Reply
  108. Open the doors and windows and leave it out in the sun if you can. It will help to use an electric fan as well if you can get within reach of an extension cord. The smell will go away within a few days doing this a few hours here and there.
    You can hide the smell using various products sold to hide unpleasant smells.

    Reply

Leave a Comment