How many people take the time to grind fresh coffee beans before they brew a cup of coffee?

How many people take the time to grind fresh coffee beans before they brew a cup of coffee?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “how many coffee beans to grind

0 thoughts on “How many people take the time to grind fresh coffee beans before they brew a cup of coffee?”

  1. I seldom use pre-ground coffee, only doing so when I’m out of fresh roasted or if I have a large number of people coming over and hand grinding coffee would be too much. Once my electric grinder is repaired or I get another, then I doubt I’ll bother with pre-ground.l

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  2. I do. Virtually every morning. The only time I don’t is when I have coffee already made. Perhaps I have cold brew that’s sitting in my refrigerator. In this day and age of Zoom meetings sometimes when I’m given a 10 minute break I don’t have the time to grind fresh and brew, so I’ll use my outdated pod machine to quickly brew some espresso to help me survive the long, boring meeting.

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  3. I can’t say how many people do that, but I know that I prefer it that way and it really doesn’t take much time. I bought a semi-pro grinder (you need a burr grinder, not a cheap $50 grinder) and am very satisfied with the results.
    Freshly ground coffee just tastes better. Ideally you also want freshly roasted grains, but keeping them sealed in the fridge apparently helps.

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  4. Every time I brew coffee I grind the beans I’ll use. Read on if you care to know the reasons why…
    Coffee and coffee culture has undergone “waves” of change over the last several decades. The “first wave” came when coffee was able to be mass produced and ground for household use. At that time coffee was mostly functional. There were degrees of quality in products of course, but the range was fairly limited in what you could expect (ie: Yuban and Maxwell House tasted pretty similar).
    The “second wave” can largely be credited to Starbucks. They took a household staple that was relatively unrefined and created a product and culture around it. You even had the choice between french roast, mild roast, and flavored beans.
    Many people will agree that we are now in the “third wave” of coffee culture. The main feature of this culture revolves around an appreciation of the inherent flavors within the bean, where they originate, how they were processed, and how skillfully they were roasted. This appreciation is not unlike what’s experienced in wine or whisky culture. The beans will need to be brewed well if those subtle flavors are going to be exposed, and a big part of that process depends on a good grinder grinding the beans before each cup is brewed. Now all you need to do is expose the grinds to the right temperature water for the right amount of time, sit with your lover and/or cat, and enjoy.

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  5. I used to grind my own coffee and used a coffee press but with the newer pod type coffee I can enjoy so many different flavors of coffee that the choice variety far outweighs the grinding option. I do still have a occasional expresso of my freshly ground coffee and enjoy this way of getting my coffee fix as it truly if the better way of having coffee but it is costly to buy whole beans and costs keep going up.. i fear this is going to be te trend fewer grinding their own and more cost for our coffee

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  6. “How many people?” You mean out of a world population of 7.7 billion on the planet? How are Quorans supposed to know that? If you want to pose a question which elicits personal experiences about brewing coffee, then do so.
    If you want to know “how many people” so you can justify your actions, then you are wasting everyone’s time.

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