How does a coffee percolator work?

How does a coffee percolator work?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “how long does a percolator take to make coffee

0 thoughts on “How does a coffee percolator work?”

  1. Percolation is the process of filtering liquids through a porous material. In terms of coffee, the coffee grounds are filtered by using water. The soluble compounds leave the filter and become freshly brewed coffee. The compounds that leave the filter are what give the coffee its taste, color, and aroma. What remains in the filter are the particles of the coffee grounds that cannot be dissolved with water, known as the granulates of the coffee beans.
    The percolator emits a strong aroma of the coffee as it freshly brews each of the coffee grounds that are in the coffee chamber. The process of percolation removes the negative parts of the coffee beans, giving you a strong brew of pure coffee once it is done percolating. Since the entire percolation process repeats itself multiple times, the end result of the percolated coffee is a strong brew. All the coffee grounds in the percolator are brewed to their fullest, giving you a bold taste of coffee throughout the pot.
    The percolation coffee method is also a very convenient for camping trips as you can make your coffee without the need of electricity, a flame will percolate the coffee just as well.

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  2. Water goes into bottom of the pot. Next, place the metal strainer basket on its stand. Place ground coffee into the basket. Put the percolator top on the pot. Turn on the stove. Wait for the coffee to percolate through the glass bubbler on top. Brew to taste.

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  3. Well, until Mr. Coffee, in the late 70s, most households had a percolator for Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, family reunions. It’s a simple concept — put real coffee in the basket, then set it a-percolatin’ for 10, 12 minutes, and you’d get something better than Folger’s or Maxwell House or Chock Ful O’ Nuts instant.
    You didn’t do it every morning, it was too much effort, but you did it at holidays and parties. And the results were noticeable, it was better than instant coffee.
    But nowadays a K-cup or a high-tech coffee-maker will do just as well, with zero effort, just pop a thingie in the thingie.

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  4. A percolator works by taking perfectly good water and coffee, and combining the two in the most hideous and ghastly of ways. If you’re going to use such a device, don’t waste the money on good coffee. Load up on Folgers or Maxwell House, or just grab one of those white cans that says “coffee” on the front.
    As far as the mechanics of it, a percolator takes boiling water and sends it up a tube to a basket of ground coffee, where the water “percolates” down through the grounds and lands back in the base as “coffee”. There are problems with this process:
    The water is boiling, which is too hot to properly extract coffee;
    The water percolates down through the grounds and lands smack dab into the basin of water from which it came, making a mixture of extracted coffee and unpercolated water;
    The process invariably sends semi-coffee back through the cycle over and over again, taking extracted coffee liquid back through the process. Eventually you get coffee filtering back over grounds that have been stripped of their desirable essence and are now just giving off vile and bitter essence.
    Back when we didn’t know better here in the US, this was an acceptable way to make coffee. The resulting product was strong, bitter, and needed sugar and creamer of some type to be palatable. Some hard core types just drank it straight, thinking the bitter brew was how coffee was supposed to taste. Many people added egg shells to the pot to “smooth it out”. We are a more enlightened society now. There is no need to break out one of those peculiar gadgets when there are better and more efficient ways to make a decent brew.

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  5. To ruin your coffee, but, if you’re using a percolator, the coffee you bought for it was probably ruined long before you bought it.

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  6. Quite simply put, it is a pour-over, that, if not stopped on time, will continue, endlesly, to pour boiling hot, ever bitter becoming brew!

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