How do you prevent getting oily coffee bean when roasting coffee beans?

How do you prevent getting oily coffee bean when roasting coffee beans?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “non oily dark roast coffee beans

0 thoughts on “How do you prevent getting oily coffee bean when roasting coffee beans?”

  1. By concluding the roasting cycle before it gets to that stage.
    The oils in coffee beans are produced further into the roasting cycle, after second crack. The oily, shiny surface is characteristic of medium-dark and dark roasted beans. The longer you roast, the more oily the surface of the beans get.
    Note that this not an undesirable quality. The natural oils in coffee are rich, delicious, complex, beneficial to the taste. For many roasters and coffee lovers, this is very much a desirable quality, and a necessary element for good, well-balanced flavor.
    Others prefer lighter roasted and medium-roasted coffees.
    If, for some reason, you feel it’s important to avoid bringing the coffee to its full flavor potential, then change your roasting method so that you’re roasting medium and light roasted coffee.
    In order to achieve this, you’d need to conclude the roast (prematurely) while the coffee beans are still medium brown, and dry.
    Each roaster, and coffee consumer, has their own taste preference.

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  2. Don’t roast for too long.
    Oily beans will result from a “dark roast”.
    Usually that would be going too far into “second crack”.
    These days I prefer a lighter roast stopped just before “second crack” starts.
    How to tell when that point is would be the answer to a different question.
    So for the sake of this answer it would be easier to just stop your roast at the end of “first crack”.

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