How do I make Turkish coffee without an ibrik?

How do I make Turkish coffee without an ibrik?

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0 thoughts on “How do I make Turkish coffee without an ibrik?”

  1. I was staring at this question, puzzling over why you mentioned ibrik , since it is a very different object (more like a large water can made of metal). And then it dawned on me.
    The little pot with which Turkish coffee is made is called cezve in Turkish – but it is called briki in Greek. So I suppose you thought ibrik was the Turkish version of briki . That’s quite smart and the two words actually do seem to be related (both coming from the Arabic word ibrīq )! So thanks for giving me this tiny but amusing moment of enlightenment.
    As for your question, you can use a small saucepan to make Turkish coffee if you don’t have a cezve . Yes, some purists will consider it a sacrilege and foam at the mouth with wrath like a good batch of Turkish coffee, but let them boil over by themselves. As long as you stick to your usual water/coffee proportions, the end result should be satisfactory.

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  2. I would advice an enamel Turkish coffee pot ( Cezve ). I’m sure you can find a cheap one in the internet. These are just examples to give you an idea.
    Amazon.com | Dexam Vintage Turkish Coffee Pot, 20.8×10.2×9 cm, Black: Coffee Servers
    Vintage Home 400 ml Enamelware Turkish Coffee Pot, Dove
    Vintage Home 400 ml Enamelware Turkish Coffee Pot, Dove
    Handy Turkish Coffee Pot — Nifty Red and White Enamel Ladle with Black Handle — Charming Mid Century Enamelware
    Steel ones heat too quickly and it’s hard to pour the liquid without spilling some out of the cup. Old vintage looking enamel ones are perfect.
    If you don’t want to buy anything, you can use a sauce pan or a small milk heater pot. Or a butter warmer.

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  3. As long as you use similar -a narrow neck, long small boiling pan, you can make Turkish Coffee as good as in (ibrik) or cezve as Turks call it. Even though Ibrik means “cezve” in many languages, Turks do not call it ibrik, ibrik means long spout pitcher in Turkish.
    The key is using cold water or milk if you prefer, fine ground Turkish coffee and sugar as desired. Mix them all together and start boiling on low to medium heat, move it away from heat as it starts foaming and as foam goes down put it back on the heat. Repeat this 3 times and when you see lighter cream color foam in the pot, it is time to pour it into Turkish coffee cups. If you are making more than one cup, distribute the foam with a coffee spoon into the coffee cups first and start pouring coffee on the top slowly 1/3 of a cup first, equally in all cups, then go back and fill 1/2 of all cups, then fill them up. Purpose of this is to distribute the coffee and foam equally and they all taste same.
    Best to measure the water with coffee cups before making the Turkish Coffee, i.e if you are making coffee for 2, pour two coffee cups of cold water and 2 demitasse (Turkish coffee/tea spoon) spoon coffee for each cup.
    PS: Turks do not put any cardamom or any other spices in Turkish coffee, however you will see this misinformation in almost every English written sources as they copy from each other without any factual support.

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  4. You do not need to have an İbrik to make a coffee. İbrik is for pouring out coffee or tea.
    But you need a “cezve” to make Turkish Coffee..

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