How can one pull an all nighter without energy drinks or coffee?

How can one pull an all nighter without energy drinks or coffee?

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0 thoughts on “How can one pull an all nighter without energy drinks or coffee?”

  1. In college I used to be able to stay up for several days consecutively if I needed to or wanted to, but part of that was that I never drank anything caffeinated ever (just didn’t like the taste of most of it) so I had to force myself to keep myself awake by other means –

    Food and snacking a lot (cereal + milk is a godsend)
    Drinking water
    Hygiene (Taking any kind of shower and brushing, etc always “primed” me for another twelve hours and made me feel good about myself.)
    Motivation – What exactly am I staying up for? Oh yeah, I procrastinated all semester on a semester-long paper and I’m going to fail unless I crank this thing out in three days of consecutive effort (still got an A on it!). This is probably the biggest one.

    Side note – Most people should never really *have* to pull an all-nighter in college. Ever. If you are even moderately disciplined about your time management and when you hang out with friends, it’s entirely possible to keep a normal schedule and get eight to ten hours of sleep every single day. However, wasting time and doing pointless stuff with friends who had easier workloads than I did was far too alluring for me, so I had to put forth Herculean efforts to handle my early classes.

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  2. The intrinsic understanding that there is no option than to pull off an all nighter is far more powerful than the intake of any substance to keep you up.
    In almost all possible cases, I’ve personally found that pulling an all nighter I’ve felt significantly less productive the next day, and the integral of my productivity over both days is lower than just sleeping normally.
    That basically eliminates a lot of other synthetic helpers and only one that remains is the intrinsic stimulant derived from asking myself the question “Why am I doing this?”. In the extraordinarily rare circumstances where the answer to the question evaluates to there is no option but to pull it off due to the real time nature of something you are doing, it just comes naturally.
    Note that I’ve averaged one all nighter per 5 years or so, and when I look back at it, at least one could easily have been avoided and didn’t do me much good. In general be honest with yourself and preferably avoid all nighters.

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  3. I understand how difficult it is to stay up late while coding as coding is, no doubt, a really very boring job to do at night. So, if you do this daily then you must be having a sound sleep during day time. Isn’t it?
    I would suggest you to take a nap ahead of time . A short nap (not more than 2 hours) will help you feel energized for a long night. Next is to avoid heavy meals . Heavy meals will cause you to feel sleepy as your body tries to digest what you have just eaten. Avoid heavy carbs and stick to lean meat and fruit.
    Your diet should contain a balanced amount of protein as it is helpful because it stimulates the neurotransmitter orexin. Give yourself a break during work . Even a 15 minutes break will work and refreshes your mind.
    In addition to this, you should follow a healthy routine like doing exercise and taking a balanced diet would also help you up for pulling an all nighter. If you still get dozed off while working then you should turn a hip hop/upbeat music in your headphones and chill during your break time.
    Jolt yourself awake with cold water and chew something really hard (like ice cube) or anything inedible. It will make your mind fresh while thinking the most possible ways to chew it up. And last but not the least, don’t sit in dim lights as the atmosphere also contributes to make your brain feel like sleepy.
    I hope, this will help you in some way or another. Cheers!

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  4. Below are some things that could help with staying awake the night.
    I have listed the Netflix series to watch If thats something you would find suitable to your liking. For anyone reading this thats unaware of what goes on in these series, just a warning it involves violence and illegal explicitness. But thats not to do with the reasons why both of them are well known and watched from all over the world. For me and im sure I could speak for some other people that they are good for staying up because there so stimulating whilst watching. Action & suspense build from start to end & the storyline with the actors present execute such a prai…

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  5. Some things that worked for me:

    Have strong lights on at all times.
    Snack constantly and drink a lot of water.
    Don’t sit too comfortably or lie down.
    Take cold shower breaks.

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  6. Modafinil (side effect profile is even milder than that of caffeine) – it also reduces sleep debt
    Adderall (pretty primitive, but I actually find it much less unpleasant than caffeine)
    Although I’d definitely advise caution: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/1180962v1
    http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/47580/title/Alzheimers_linked_to_lack_of_Zzzzs
    I’ve read from some sources that modafinil actually increases orexin signalling (although its effects also act independently from orexin). Orexin actually has many of the same effects as modafinil though (allowing rats to pull all-nighters without sleep debt), so that’s what made me think of the modafinil<=>orexin<=>alzheimer’s connection. But I do hope that there are other ways to suppress beta-amyloid buildup.

    Peet’s

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  7. Believe it or not, (and this will probably get me downvoted) I started smoking cigars to handle all nighters. I find nicotine to be a much better stimulant than caffeine. Its a filthy habit and I don’t recommend it. (there’s a gum for that)

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  8. I have used the following:

    Short exercise breaks.
    Bright light
    Listen to music unless that will distract you from your work
    Drink cold water
    Work standing up
    Work alongside a peer
    Have something handy to incite your ambition — something that reminds you of your ultimate goal be it the institution you hope to end up at, the item you hope to purchase, whatever it may be.

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  9. Caffeine really only solves part of the problem by blocking sleep receptors. You need to replenish the body of vitamins and minerals it loses when forced to stay up past the “bed time.” Supplements, water, OJ or other citrus juices. Plus vegetables etc. Snack but don’t eat.The best ways to stay awake are also incredibly unhealthy. Bright lights, the cold, staying hungry, pain.

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  10. Drink chilled water the moment you feel sleepy in an all nighter, especially if I am studying. It keeps me awake, it keeps me alert.

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  11. When I worked loading boxes at FedEx, I developed quite a coffee habit. I successfully replaced coffee with a Yerba Maté and Chai tea blend that worked very well to provide energy without the over-caffeinated feeling that comes from too much coffee.

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  12. This is kind of useless knowledge in the short term, but there are a number of breathing techniques I learn through Qigong practice that have made it possible for me to do all-nighters and still feel great. Took me 20 years to make it work, though.

    Victor Allen’s

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  13. When snacking, avoid foods that have a high glycemic index — i.e., that spike your blood sugar. Otherwise, your energy will spike briefly and then you will feel really tired.

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