How can one avoid watery coffee and get a stronger brew, similar to a drip coffee, out of a commercial Keurig (e.g. B155 model) using a

How can one avoid watery coffee and get a stronger brew, similar to a drip coffee, out of a commercial Keurig (e.g. B155 model) using a reusable cup?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “how to make iced coffee with keurig not watery

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  1. The hack below seems to work well. A problem with using the K-Cup machines is, as Ashlee pointed out, it uses pressure to brew a cup of coffee much faster than a regular drip machine, french press, or pourover. This is how it can extract a reasonable amount of flavor in 30 seconds, where conventional wisdom says it should take around 4 minutes (that’s how long a good french press or pourover brew takes). And with the reusable cups the pressure escapes around faster because of the larger hole in the bottom (the K-cup having tiny holes top and bottom).
    I will add one quick think not to overlook. To get a good, strong cup of coffee, you have to use enough coffee. Where a lot of k-cups use 9–12 grams of coffee to brew an 8 ounce cup, that is a bit weak by most standards. The SCA (Specialty Coffee Association), the major trade group for the coffee industry, recommends 55 grams of coffee per one litre (1000 ml) of water. That’s a ratio of 1000/55, or about 18-to-1. So use 18 times as much water as coffee. So if you use an 8 ounce cup, that’s 237 ml of water, so divide by 18 to get about 13 grams of coffee per 8 ounces of water.
    Since there are 5 grams of coffee per tablespoon, to get the right ration you want 1 tablespoon per 3 ounces of water. So an 8 ounce cup of coffee will need at least 2–2/3 tablespoons of coffee. That’s on the light end. So say 3 tbsps coffee per 8 ounces of water. Where in a K-Cup, they will only have about 2 tbsps of coffee. So make it stronger and that will somewhat make up for the less pressure in the reusable filter.
    Since I make mine a little bit stronger (about 16-to-1), I find a VERY quick-and-dirty method is to add coffee to the reusable filter (The one from Kuerig), and tap on the counter about 10 times to settle the coffee and pack it a bit tighter (slows the water down a bit). Fill to the top fill line ( a line inside the cup about 1/2 inch below the top, which is the MAX you can use in that filter anyway). And it’s done. I’m drinking a delicious cup of Ethiopean Harrar as we speak!

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  2. Ooh! Keurig Life Hack Time!
    There’s a little trick to modify the reusable Kcup so your brew is strong, dark and satisfying.
    Unfortunately, the reusable kcup by itself does not allow for enough pressure to build in the unit for a solid brew time. This usually equals watery coffee & sadness.
    Quick fix!
    Step 1: Drink a cup of coffee using a regular, disposable kcup.
    Next.. remove the foil top. Cut out the filter and empty the used coffee from the cup. You should now have a little white plastic cup, with a hole in the bottom.
    Next Step…There’s a ridge near the top of the kcup. Carefully cut the top off the kcup, using the ridge as a guide. Throw the little top sliver of plastic away.
    …insert the plastic kcup into your reusable kcup and make sure the hole…

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  3. The only way I know would be 1) toss the Keurig into the trash heap it belongs in and 2) buy a proper coffee maker.
    Edit 1: I guess I should explain my answer a little better. Automatic coffee makers are regulated in how they make coffee. Water temperature and water flow rate are all set by the factory and not adjustable. They only way to make a stronger cup of coffee is to manipulate the beans. Grind, quantity, roast, volume, etc are all easily modified in a drip coffee maker, French Press, Pour-over, etc. Keurig machines do not have that much latitude, the reusable cup still has a very limited volume.
    Original question: How can one avoid watery coffee and get a stronger brew, similar to a drip coffee, out of a commercial Keurig (e.g. B155 model) using a reusable cup?

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