How can I learn to like coffee?

How can I learn to like coffee?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “how to make yourself like coffee

0 thoughts on “How can I learn to like coffee?”

  1. The answers from Rick Groszkiewicz and Hubert Ursua are solid, and I have just one thing to add: see if you can find a roaster or coffee shop that does cuppings.
    In a cupping you’ll try several different coffee varieties back to back. If it’s done correctly, you’ll at least learn how roast level and origin affect the taste of coffee.
    My wife isn’t a coffee drinker, but she went to a cupping with me once. She still doesn’t drink coffee, mostly because the caffeine makes her sick, but she says she understands why I like it so much now.
    Here’s a video that shows what a cupping looks like:

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  2. When I first drank coffee, I hated it with a capital H.
    I then made a cup for myself, poured some milk and way too much sugar, and it was actually good!
    I got rid of the milk as fast as I could, because I knew it really changed the taste of coffee, and I wanted to appreciate coffee for what it was.
    I then started reducing the amount of sugar I put in bit by bit, until finally I took the big plunge: coffee, black, no sugar. By adjusting slowly to the natural taste, I was able to appreciate it more and more.
    Now, I like my coffee like I like my soul: really fucking black.

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  3. I don’t know if this is true or not, but I read somewhere that if there is a food or beverage that you do not like if you try it 17 times you will begin to like it. I have found this true in some things, the first time I tasted papaya I thought it tasted absolutely horrible, not sure if I got a bad one or not, I have eaten it quite a few times since and am beginning to acquire a taste for it, when it is available at a breakfast buffet I always take a couple of pieces and eat it. It is available in most breakfast buffets at hotels in South America. When I first had avocado I didn’t like it, now it is one of my favorite fooda

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  4. Find a specialty coffee shop (sometimes called 3rd wave coffee shops) near your place. Ask for a single-origin arabica coffee that’s light and fruity. It’s the opposite of the “office coffee” (heavy and bitter).
    Have it hand-brewed using a V60 or Aeropress (just throw those words and they’ll understand). The coffee that they’ll serve you should be black coffee. Sometimes it’ll have a light color similar to iced tea. But definitely no milk. Don’t order an espresso since it’s harder to appreciate.
    Don’t just taste the coffee, smell it also. Ask the barista how should it taste and smell. Look for those aromas and flavors. You might not find all of the flavors since tasting is subjective; but you’ll definitely know it is different.
    The coffee that changed the way I tasted coffee was a cup made from Ethiopian Yirgacheffe beans. It smelled like flowers and tasted like citrus fruits. It was coffee that was similar to tea.
    The nice thing about 3rd wave coffee shops is they are all transparent. You can the baristas: “where did the coffee come from?”, “when was it roasted?”, “how to taste the coffee?”, and so on… They are willing to educate people more about what is a good cup of coffee.

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  5. Behavioral Modification. Whenever you have a cup of coffee and still don’t like it, give yourself a timeout and sit in the corner facing the wall for five minutes.
    Pretty soon, you’ll learn to love it like all us normal people and we can all march off into the brave new world together.
    Or not. Why on earth do you need to “make” yourself like coffee. I’m raising a weirdo who’s now nine years old and has had about two sips of coca cola – or any carbonated beverage – in his entire life. Other kids will drink three or four Cokes per day. It’s about taste.
    You can teach yourself to recognize the qualities that coffee lovers appreciate in good coffee, but “like” is subjective. It may just not be your cup of tea (ha ha, I slay myself).

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  6. You might have to “make” yourself like single malt scotch, golf tournaments, opera, ballet, or Russian novels, but good grief, coffee tastes good, it’s naturally likable and effortless to find pleasure in.

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  7. Try a medium roast (any brand) with very light cream and 1–2 Raw Sugars. It will help bite the “coffee flavor” a little bit for you. Or try a Cafe Latte. It’s a small amount of potent coffee and the rest is milk so you get a hint of coffee to start off.

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  8. Assuming you’re drinking your coffee black and not liking it, try adding things like flavored creamer, milk, sugar, honey, stevia, etc.
    This will help to minimize the actual taste of your coffee with other things you might enjoy.
    Experiment with your brew.
    Happy brewing!

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  9. Have you ever had Really Good coffee?? I hated coffee for 30+ years, because I only tasted the stuff at work (too weak!), or at Starbucks (badly burned!). I maybe had one decent cup of coffee in a year’s time.
    It is MUCH easier to appreciate coffee if you actually get to taste something good. Ask your friends – if lucky, you can find a coffee fanatic who actually knows what good coffee is.

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  10. start reading about coffee; understanding breeds appreciation, curiosity, and confidence
    start experimenting with coffee; you could mix it with something so you find it easier to like; e.g. cream and honey (I still like mine that way)
    talk to a coffee connoisseur; they may be able to inspire you.

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  11. I love coffee but what’s the big deal? Why do you want to *learn* to like it? Try out some different styles – for e.g. American coffee is very very different from Indian (read south indian) coffee and again different from european coffee. See if you like any of these and can then try local variations. I love coffee and was brought up in India before moving to USA after college. I hated American black coffee for a long time but since I love coffee inherently (esp the aroma), I eventually developed a taste for it.
    Frankly, I think most of the coffee love has to do with the aroma. If you don’t love the aroma, I doubt you will ever love the taste.

    Victor Allen’s

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  12. I’d like to start off by saying: There is nothing wrong with disliking coffee, it’s an acquired taste and not everyone likes it and that is ok.
    If you are determined for whatever reason to like coffee I’ll tell you what I did because honestly I hated the actual taste of coffee until January… of this year.
    Don’t start with anything super coffee flavored ie straight espresso, I still think espresso by itself is just gross
    Start by creaming it up and adding lots of flavors
    Slowly start taking flavor and cream out

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  13. I really like this question, Rod. I’ll answer this as best as possible to convert you into a coffee drinker!
    If you’re one of those people who can’t stand the smell or taste of coffee, there’s no need to feel alone. Many people find it difficult to enjoy this popular beverage, no matter how many times they try it. Here are a few tips on how to learn to like coffee:
    Start with a small amount. Some people find that the taste is better if they start with a small amount and gradually increase their intake.
    Try different flavours . Coffee is available in many different flavours, so experiment and see which ones you like the best.
    Avoid drinking caffeine late into the night. Consuming caffeine late into the night can make it harder for you to sleep later on, which might lead to a dislike for coffee in the long run.
    Coffee with a snack. A satisfying snack might reduce your risk of acid reflux while enhancing your coffee’s flavour. Snacks can cover any unpleasant coffee flavours. Some typical coffee-related munchies are natural dark chocolate, bagels, and doughnuts.
    Be patient . Avoid rushing into stronger coffee drinks, and give yourself time to become used to the taste of coffee. Although coffee is an acquired taste, each person’s threshold for liking it varies.
    Hopefully, this turns you into a drinker! Best of luck!

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  14. Okay, so I’m seeing this question 2 possible different ways, but I’ll answer both!
    I just can’t get into coffee, I don’t really like it but I want to!
    If that’s the case, consumption is key. Just start drinking coffee, at least one cup a day, more if possible. It’s one of those things most can build up to. Once you regularly begin consuming the beverage, your attitude to it will evolve and you’ll likely become more fond of the drink over time. There are a ton of different ways to drink coffee so continue to experiment and you’ll probably run into something you genuinely enjoy. There are some folks who will just never like coffee, which breaks my heart, but if you are one of those, that’s okay too. I don’t have a problem or look down upon non-coffee drinkers as long as they don’t have a problem with or look down upon coffee drinkers!
    2. I notice everyone loves coffee, but not everyone loves me, so I want to make myself more like coffee so people will love me too!
    My answer to this one, can’t be done, and if it could, don’t do it. There actually are a number of folks who not only hate coffee, but hate those associated with coffee. The type of people starting to permeate our culture with the attitude that, “It’s not enough for me to have my own beliefs tolerated, but anybody who believes differently is wrong and must be silenced.” So if you were to be more like coffee that group would already hate you. Now, on to those who aren’t wrong! LOL. The coffee drinkers of the world. There are those that are just plain addicted to coffee, those that do drink coffee, but could take it out leave it, those that see coffee as nothing more than a hobby, those that must have coffee or they will die!, etc,etc. If you were more like coffee, you’re really just opening yourself up to a plethora of unhealthy relationships! You’ll be used, abused, overlooked for what you are naturally, not good. Those that love you for who you are (black coffee drinkers) are only using you for how you benefit them, and there are those who love you, but only if you meet their ideal (these are the folks that dump cream, sugars, syrups, alcohol, etc.). That group doesn’t really even like you, but the idea of you and what they can make of you to fulfill their own selfish tastes and desires. Then there are the coffee art crowd, they don’t really want you, they just want to dress you up and show you off. You’re not really important to them beyond making a statement of how they wish to be seen.
    So, all in all, you want to enjoy your coffee, and if you don’t care for the stuff, you can likely build up a tolerance that will grow into an actual joy of the drink. So, go ahead, like coffee, but don’t hurt yourself trying to be like coffee. It only leads to pain, ask me how I know!

    Eight O’Clock

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  15. Add milk, cream, and/or sugar.
    If you want to branch out, try gourmet sweeteners like vanilla sugar, muscovado, raw sugar, or chocolate powder.
    Acidic, light roasts taste best with milk or cream, which dulls its bite while letting its delicate flavor come through.

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