Have you ever roasted your own coffee beans (in a pan/Dutch oven, not a roaster) and, if so, would you recommend it over purchasing pre

Have you ever roasted your own coffee beans (in a pan/Dutch oven, not a roaster) and, if so, would you recommend it over purchasing pre-roasted beans?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “roasting coffee beans in the oven

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  1. Wall Oven: For almost a decade, I’ve enjoyed Coffee Roasting with nothing more than a baking pan and a wall oven . I am very happy with the results and would recommend roasting your own coffee over purchasing roasted beans whenever you have the opportunity.
    Other Methods: I’ve also owned and enjoyed a GENE Cafe drum roaster (until it succumbed to self-combustion, despite a chaff collector and dedicated venting). I’ve roasted coffee beans in a pan but would not repeat that approach because the our stove-top downdraft vent could not handle the smoke. Maybe an overhead vent hood would make pan-roasting feasible.
    Evenness: As Edward Zuckerberg describes, pan (and oven) roasting will not produce a perfectly even roast the way a dedicated drum roaster will. But if you like freshly-roasted coffee, it is hard to beat the wall oven for convenience, volume and venting.
    Technique: As far as technique, I normally preheat the oven to 500 Fahrenheit, spread the green beans on a pan, set a timer (15–25 minutes depending on the type of beans), and put the beans in the oven. I monitor the roast through the oven window, opening the oven to stir the beans in the pan whenever there is evidence of uneven roasting. When the desired crack or roast color is achieved, I remove the tray of beans from the oven and cool them outside on a rack.
    Green Bean Vendors: If you want suggestions for where to purchase green beans, I contributed an answer to Who are the best retailers for purchasing green coffee beans?
    Measurement: For the first year of this hobby, I used a digital Multimeter with a temperature probe to monitor the oven temperature, and kept a notebook on what temperature/time combinations worked best for which beans. Once I was comfortable with the process I stopped taking such diligent notes.
    Post-processing/Storage: I do not normally bother winnowing chaff off of the roasted beans, but this is easily accomplished if you want. I store the beans in airtight containers and try to use them or give them away within two weeks. After that brief window of opportunity, they don’t taste much better than store-bought roasted beans.
    Oven Venting / Smoke: When we moved to a home where the wall oven was not vented outdoors through the roof, I stopped roasting as frequently. When I do roast, I place a portable High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter beside the indoor oven vent to capture some of the smoke. To reduce the smoke produced during roasting, you can purchase green beans that have been washed as part of the processing, these are labeled as either washed or wet-processed.

    Have you ever roasted your own coffee beans (in a pan/Dutch oven, not a roaster) and, if so, would you recommend it over purchasing pre

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  2. The question: Have you ever roasted your own coffee beans (in a pan/Dutch oven, not a roaster) and, if so, would you recommend it over purchasing pre-roasted beans?
    Yes, I have. I’ve made coffee in the Ethiopian way using a jebena . One of the first steps is to roast green coffee beans in a pan over an open flame.
    It’s a smokey, intensive experience. No matter how careful you are, you’re going to get a very uneven roast – some beans will end up dark, others will be just barely past second crack. It’s tedious to take care of the husks, and it stains the pan.
    While I think with practice you’d get better quality, to roast your beans well you really need specialized equipment. Many people use modified popcorn poppers or similar devices – there are options which lie between “roasting in a pan” and “buying a commercial roaster”.
    One thing I should add is that while an uneven roast is a Very Bad thing in most brewing methods, I think that it’s actually beneficial when using a jebena . Everything about the Ethiopian method is uneven – you roast in a pan over a flame, you grind by hand with a mortar and pestle, you put the ground coffee in a clay pot and you actually let the water boil – and it seems to me that the resultant coffee is richer and more flavorful than you’d get any other way.

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  3. Edward had a great answer. You can certainly try it. If you do, let the beans sit for 24 hours before grinding. Over time, with a lot of batches, practice and expensive equipment many home roasters are achieving great results. In the end, you will get the freshest roasts possible but most people will not notice an improvement over a skilled commercial roaster.
    Roasting coffee is an art and a scienc…

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  4. I have roasted beans is a hot air popcorn popper. They popper will tend to burn out, but they are inexpensive. If you like a roast that is darker than an American roast, which is a medium to light roast, the smoke will set off your smoke alarms, so you will need to do it outside. Not sure it is worth the trouble, but give it a try.

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  5. I’ve experimented with roasting and I roast my beans on the stove top. I usually crank the stove to the highest setting, and place a pan on top for approximately a minute. Once the pan is hot I then add the beans.
    A perfectly even roast is close to impossible to achieve without a proper roaster but I work around this by giving the pan a toss every 30 seconds. I stop roasting once I’ve heard the first “crack”, which usually happens after approximately 5 minutes, keeping in mind that the beans continue to cook for a short bit after one removes them from the heat.
    Fresh home-roasted beans always trump store-bought beans.

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