Does black coffee cause tooth decay? How does it compare to coffee with cream and/or sugar?

Does black coffee cause tooth decay? How does it compare to coffee with cream and/or sugar?

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  1. Frequent ingestion of food and drink containing added/refined sugar is necessary for decay. There is zero sugar in black coffee unless you put it in.
    Cream has lactose which is a sugar but it is not metabolized to produce acid by cavity-causing bacteria so it does not promote decay.
    Adding sugar to your coffee then slowly sipping it over time is a great way to promote tooth decay.

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  2. No it certainly does not. It may or may not do the opposite: protecting your teeth from harmful bacteria. At least, in this article a British newspaper suggests it does.
    How a cup of black coffee stops your teeth rotting: Certain type of bean has property that can help break down bacteria that causes plaque
    Coffee with sugar does cause tooth decay for sure, just like any other sugared drink.

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  3. Enamel is the outer layer of your teeth, the layer that protects it from the environment and keeps your teeth healthy. When your enamel is worn down, your teeth not only become more sensitive, but also become more susceptible to disease and trauma. Drinking a large amount of coffee on a regular basis can break down your enamel, causing sensitivity problems. That’s why most dentists recommend using enamel-strengthening toothpastes if you’re a coffee drinker – it will make your enamel more resistant to corrosion and slow or stop the loss of enamel caused by drinking coffee .
    Dentists also recommend rinsing your mouth with water or eating a piece of cheese after drinking coffee in order to neutralize the acid. If you have your coffee before brushing your teeth, you’ll want to make sure you wait for one full hour after you’ve finished your morning brew in order to give your enamel time to harden.
    One common misconception is that coffee causes tooth decay. The truth is that coffee doesn’t directly contribute to cavity formation; it simply makes it easier for cavities to form.
    Directory of Dentistry – Click Here To Read

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