Do I have to feel bad about the fact that my cat is brutally murdering rodents/birds for fun?

Do I have to feel bad about the fact that my cat is brutally murdering rodents/birds for fun?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “coffee because murdering is wrong

0 thoughts on “Do I have to feel bad about the fact that my cat is brutally murdering rodents/birds for fun?”

  1. First, your cat is not a murderer. He or she is not having fun. And he or she is not brutal. Cats are some of the most efficient killers in the animal kingdom. When they are hunting, they catch and kill their prey very quickly, by biting through their spines or breaking their necks. The only cats that don’t do this are domestic cats who have not been taught to hunt. They don’t know what to do. Their instincts tell them that this small creature is their natural prey but they don’t have the skills to kill it, so it looks as if they are ‘playing’ with it. This isn’t cruelty, it’s inexperience. A study done in England showed that domestic cats account for an astonishing number of deaths among birds and rodents. This used to be considered a good thing. Mice and rats invaded food stores and contaminated them, spreading disease, but a good cat could keep your pantry relatively pest free. Birds ate the seeds and fruits that were meant for human consumption. Ditto, the cat.
    If you don’t want your cat to follow its natural instincts, you have two options.
    Bell the cat. Simple solution. Make sure the cat is wearing a collar and attach a bell so the little critters can hear it coming. Not a harness. Cats go squirming through a lot of places where a harness will get stuck. They can almost always wiggle their way out of a collar, but the harness will trap them.
    Keep the cat indoors. I have been a cat owner for more than thirty years and with one exception, they have all led long, happy lives without ever going outside.

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  2. Slightly. It is your fault that your cat is outside. Outdoor cats are the top invasive species and kill thousands of native species every year. They are killing the natural flora and fauna that lives there, which they can’t be blamed for—they’re cats. It’s what they do. If at all possible, and you want to stop feeling bad about dead small animals, you should convert your cat to be indoor full time.

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  3. Cats don’t commit murder. Murder is a moral concept thus solely a human concept. Your cat’s actions are a result of its natural instincts, and it can’t be aware that humans may see them as immoral. It has no concept of morality anyway. So ultimately it’s on your own head that the birds are killed, because it’s your cat. I’m not saying that you’re a murderer – there is no law that could convict you as a murderer because your cat kills birds. And murder, by definition, is the killing of one human being by another. That it’s birds being killed disqualifies you (and your cat} from being a murderer.
    Anyway, that you are thinking about all of this tells me that you are both an intelligent and a compassionate person.
    Your cat is giving you a glimpse into the natural world, where animals kill and are killed on a regular basis. That’s just the way it is. Anyway, I hope you resolve this dilemma. Cats kill a million birds every year in the world, most likely. If you think it’s bad for your cat to be doing that, then are you willing to keep your cat indoors? This was a tough one for me when I had a cat. My cat killed birds and chipmunks. What did I do? The chickenshit thing – I let my wife decide what to do. And she said let the cat be happy and roam free. So that’s what we did.

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  4. You don’t “have” to feel bad about anything. But you should. As the other person said, they are a highly invasive species that have completely wiped out certain birds in places. They can also ruin gardens, spread diseases, rile up dogs, cause car accidents and simply great harm to eachother. Not to mention, indoor cats live 4x longer.

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  5. Why! Lazy Bones had the worst day of his life one day our two chipmunks managed to escape their cage and Lazy Bones suddenly found a very fat, aggressive and angered she chipmunk face to face in the living room. He tried to be friendly, so very carefully and slowly elongated his plump body and delicately extended his nose to sniff the chipmunk. But the she chipmunk was very ill tempered. She only stand a few microseconds of sniffing when she decided it was enough and simply jumped over the cat, stepped on its face, on its back and went ahead into her affairs, which were escaping me. Lazy Bones had such an impression from this I forgot the chipmunk to hunt the cat instead because he went was so scared he actually jumped into the air and rushed inside bumping with nearly every obstacle between him and the last dark corner he used to sleep in. I thought the she chipmunk had bitten Lazy Bones in the nose and I already knew how painful it is, but no, the cat was OK, only looking very pale of the nose and indeed spent the next few days hiding without eating. The she chipmunk stayed aloof two days before I managed to catch her up. So when Pipistrella showed up once with a dove s carcass and Sombrita also brought to praise her prize of a small rodent, we only scolded them for leaving the toy on the bed but let them play with them (yuck!) at will and did not even wonder where in hell could they get such prey. In comparison, Michelle was never a problem for the small bird that roamed free another apartment for nearly two years, and she did almost catch him once when the bird was walking over the sleeping cat. There is nothing you can do about it, cats do have their own temperament and preferences.

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  6. It’s a well known fact that domestic cats are the key killers of neighborhood birds, which makes them very unpopular with bird lovers.
    With that said, cats are natural-born killers, and anything that moves from moths and butterflies to mice, rats, squirrels, chipmunks, baby rabbits, moles, snakes, lizards, and birds are fair game. When I lived in Texas, I didn’t have an issue with our cats killing rodents because it kept the snake population down. And in the same vein, killing a baby snake meant it didn’t grow into a full-sized “scary” adult.
    It does bother me when my cats kills birds, squirrels, baby rabbits, and other cute critters. For this reason, my four-footed murderers are now house-bound. Plus, in-door cats live longer and have fewer health problems.
    If your cat goes outdoors, you might try putting a collar with a bell on it so they can’t sneak up on innocent birds and critters. There’s no point scolding your cat because it probably views its conquests as gifts or hunts simply for pleasure. Even in the house, a cat will relentlessly stalk and slaughter flies, spiders, and other insects.

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