Can you use a stove-top espresso maker on an electrical stove?

Can you use a stove-top espresso maker on an electrical stove?

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  1. Yes. It’s harder to control heat on an electric stove, so watch it carefully. But if you can heat it on a gas stove, you can heat it on an electric stove.

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  2. Various people have said that you can – but that’s not a universal yes for all electric stoves.
    There’s one type of electric stove that’s going to cause you a problem, and they’re becoming more and more common these days – induction.
    Induction hobs rely on cookware with some amount of iron content. Cookware for use on induction is either made from steel, iron, or has a slug of steel incorporated into the base to make it induction-friendly.
    Many of the moka pots on the market are aluminium. If you have an induction hob, make sure you’re getting a steel moka pot – Bialetti make some, as do other manufacturers.

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  3. Yes, you can. Gas flames are much easier to adjust and control for level than the electric stove “burner” which essentially cycles on & off to “control” the level of heat.
    I have an electric stove. I much prefer gas, but electric is what I have, so I have adapted. To make things like using a mokapota little easier and more controllable, I have adjusted my technique somewhat and I can now get consistent/repeatable results and control for times I play with the grind level or particular roast of the coffee.
    I pre-heat the water going into my moka pot. I use an electric kettle that is way faster than any stovetop coil I have ever experienced and is faster than almost all conduction stovetops. This saves time and allows me to get right to the brewing without having to wait for the pot to heat up on the stovetop. With a gas stove, a prepped moka pot will heat up a great deal more rapidly than an electric coil from “cold” to pushing up coffee from the center tube.
    I pre-heat the stovetop electric “burner”while I heat the water for the moka pot. I put a small diameter stovetop coil on high while I heat up water in an electric kettle. It takes longer to get fully heated than it takes my kettle to get water to just below boiling.
    Now, with everything pre-heated, ground coffee in my moka pot, and hot water in the bottom of the pot, I place the assembled pot onto the hot burner and watch closely. It only takes a short time for things to get going from here.
    I leave the top of the moka pot “up” (open) and at the first sign of coffee liquid slowly coming up through the center tube, I use the handle of the pot and lift the pot several inches above the electric coil. If I had a gas stove, I would be adjusting the flame to a low level and the temperature at the bottom of the pot would quickly drop. On an electric stovetop, however, turning it lower just shuts the coil off, the temperature slowly drops until it reaches a thermostatically controlled point, then turns fully “on” again. There is a kind of “heat momentum” going on between the stovetop coil and the bottom of the pot here, so the effect is much less responsive than with a gas stove. Picking up the pot and raising it above the burner (still on “high”) allows me to find the temperature sweet spot above the hot burner where the heat input is enough to continue to drive heated water upward through the bed of grounds, but not with the force that creates channels of steam piercing the beds ands creating a spurting or erupting volcano effect out of the center tube (too hot!).

    Can you use a stove-top espresso maker on an electrical stove?

    Above: Photo #1: First sign! Time to lift the pot above the burner!
    I hold the pot in that sweet spot above the burner for the next minute or so as the coffee is expressed upwards through the center tube as a nice, well-bodied liquid with a little bit of foamy “crema.” It’s not the same level quality as a proper espresso crema, but it is WAY better than the thin, oily, bitter, darker brown stuff common to moka pot coffee that is typically made too-hot-too-fast.

    Can you use a stove-top espresso maker on an electrical stove?

    Above: Photo #2: Nice, slow, steady pressure gives a full-bodied cup and you can see the proper development of “moka crema.”
    While this may all sound rather “fussy,” it only takes about 5 minutes—about the same time it takes to dump a couple scoops of pre-ground coffee into a filter basket of a drip machine and wait for it to drip hot (usually not hot enough) water over the bed of grounds. You get a richer cup of coffee in the same amount of time. You do have to be more hands-on, but after you do it a couple times, you realize you are not really spending more time and only a little more effort than making a cup of drip coffee. If you have ever practiced pour-overs, it’s about the same level of effort, but With a moka pot, I never weigh out (mass) my grinds or my water, nor do I use use a thermometer to determine the actual temperature. With my moka, it’s strictly eye-balled and enjoyed.
    Just for giggles, I did another pot and let it cook the way most folks do. Compare the color and body of the coffee coming out of the tube with the photos above. This fast & hot coffee was thin & bitter. See that teeny bit of “foam” there? That was not crema or even real foam. They were transient bubbles in the thin liquid coming out of the center tube and those bubbles never made it to the bottom of the moka pot and were not present in the poured cup.

    Can you use a stove-top espresso maker on an electrical stove?

    Above : Photo #3: note the thin liquid coming from this too-hot-too-fast pot of moka pot coffee. I have already removed it from the heat so the spurting has ended, but the thin liquid is still being expressed and there is no “crema” formation…just a thin bit of bubbling that quickly disappears.
    To end…one more shot ( below) of good stuff coming from the center tube as I held the pot a couple inches above the electric burner. Notice how thick and rich it is and how there is a developing, clingy crema foam. This was taken just before the “moka crema” shot shown in photo #2 (above) earlier.

    Can you use a stove-top espresso maker on an electrical stove?

    Above: Photo #4: Good stuff coming out! Thick body. Lots of flavor. Not bitter. A kind of “crema” is developing.
    FYI: Tappan electric rangetop, circa 1965. Aluminum “Primula Express” moka pot made in Venezuela, circa 1976.

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  4. Yes you can use a moka pot on an electric stove. It doesn’t heat like gas, but it works. Some believe you should put hot water (not boiling) into the bottom of the moka pot so that when you put it on the stove it will boil quicker. I’ve tried that and just using cool water from the start, and I’ve achieved about the same result. Honestly, I think the important part is your coffee grind and packing it a little, not too much, but a little to build some pressure.

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  5. YES, just make sure to use the most fitting burner, to your pot, or place it, so that the handle is out of the range of the circle of heat! Hot handles are a bitch to cope with!

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