Can you mix different types of coffee grounds? How does it affect the taste?

Can you mix different types of coffee grounds? How does it affect the taste?

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  1. Yes. I do it all the time. I purposely buy different beans, and blend them together. Different roasts and different types of beans dramatically affect flavor. So, for example, say you like a South American bean like a Brazil roasted lightly because of the floral notes and acidity, but it’s a bit much. And you also like the sweet, smoky flavor of a dark roasted Sumatran. Blending them will give you the high notes of the Brazil, but not so overwhelmingly, and provide that sweet smokiness that smooths it out. So I do it all the time.
    Now, you can’t just throw together any grounds (well you can, but your mileage may vary!). So they should be of equal freshness, and ground to the same grind size, so they brew evenly. And mix them really well.

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  2. Yes you can. It is called blending. It will alter the taste of the final coffee in ways to numerous to list here.
    Occasionally, I will buy a new type of coffee and it just is not to my liking. I will play with different blends to use the coffee rather than wasting it. I always start with 2 parts ‘good’ coffee to 1 part ‘bad’ coffee. I will adjust the ratios from there depending on the results. It can be fun to try different blends and avoid tastebud boredom.
    Adding a lighter roast to a darker roast will mellow the taste of the dark roast alone. Depending on the ratios and roasts you use, the blend can make a better coffee or a worse cup. There are people who spend their entire working lives trying to create the next ‘perfect’ blend.
    Original question: Can you mix different types of coffee grounds? How does it affect the taste?

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  3. Yes. Most of the coffee you will buy in a supermarket is mixed coffee grounds.
    In fact, the only time you can be sure you aren’t getting “mixed coffee grounds” is when you buy a single-origin bag of coffee. From its name alone it means the coffee was sourced from just one place, usually just one farm and sometimes even only from the same lot.
    In most other cases a bag of coffee, whether whole bean or pre-ground, has a mix of beans coming from different places. It’s especially popular to see “Barista blends” or some other nonsense be made of say 20% Arabica beans and 80% Robusta beans. Coffee sellers do it all the time to give larger quantity of product using cheaper ingredients. Robusta beans are easier to grow, so they are generally cheaper to buy.

    Can you mix different types of coffee grounds? How does it affect the taste?

    But in the third wave coffee drinking culture Arabica beans are the only thing worth drinking, so they scoff at the very notion of drinking Robusta. These people should never buy a bag of “Barista Blend” or “Espresso Blend” similar, those are usually blends of different beans, usually Robusta and Arabica.

    Can you mix different types of coffee grounds? How does it affect the taste?

    Anytime it says “Blend” on the bag you know you are getting a mix of different grounds. When the coffee is pre-ground this is done a lot because you can’t really tell if the beans were different when they’re ground, no? The blend is usually a blend of Arabica and Robusta, because this is the only thing that makes sense in terms of cost savings. Mix in the more expensive Arabica and put some “cheaper Robusta” extenders and sell the bag for significantly more than you could a pure Robusta bag.
    It’s rarer to see something like this with whole bean coffee, but it does happen like with this bag of Trader Joe Coffee.

    Can you mix different types of coffee grounds? How does it affect the taste?

    In general, avoid pre-ground coffee because these are usually the cheap quality beans which were sorted out of the production yield (they are cracked, small, etc.) and are the “lower grade” beans, then ground so you can’t tell.
    Meanwhile the higher quality beans are sorted and sold as unground whole beans. Buying whole bean has other benefits, including being much fresher when you grind it right before you brew the cup.

    Can you mix different types of coffee grounds? How does it affect the taste?

    Now, let me say this outright. There is nothing wrong with drinking Robusta. And frankly I actually prefer Robusta beans many times to Arabica beans. I love the strong, nutty coffee taste. Arabica beans don’t get that kind of body and flavor, and tend to be sour.
    I blend different kinds of beans together all the time to discover new flavors. It is one of the more enjoyable facets of the hobby. (Yes, coffee-drinking is a hobby for me). There is nothing wrong with doing this and it can be delicious. Experiment to see what you like best. The taste will differ according to what beans you use, obviously. You will get a mix of the the two different parent beans; the results can be quite delicious if you find beans with synergy in the right proportions.
    But you should know what you are getting into when buying coffee. And if you’re the type that loves to drink Arabica for whatever reason, know that you should never get pre-ground coffee because chances are you are getting 80% Robusta and only 20% Arabica.

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  4. Yes, you absolutely can mix different types of coffee grounds. Each type of coffee will contribute a bit to the final mix; you will still taste all of them. I am fond of a mixture of about 2/3 dark roast, for the intense chocolatey flavor, with 1/3 light roast, to bring a little more brightness in. You can also mix different types of the same roast to get the balance of flavors you’re looking for.

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  5. You can mix coffee beans if that floats your boat, but what’s the point in mixing coffee grounds? That’s what you have AFTER the pots been brewed.

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