Can you grow plants entirely in used coffee grounds with no soil?

Can you grow plants entirely in used coffee grounds with no soil?

You can check the answer of the people under the question at Quora “are coffee grounds good for all plants

0 thoughts on “Can you grow plants entirely in used coffee grounds with no soil?”

  1. Yes, you can. Why do you think they call them coffee “GROUNDS?”
    Ok, stupid joke. That’s not the reason they’re called grounds. If you did this you would have the beginnings of a great hydroponic operation. I say this because basically, hydroponics involve growing plants with their roots in either an absorbant soil like medium or in some sort of nutrient bath where you control the ph and the nutrients going into feed the plant.
    In normal organic farming (I’ll use farming as an example) the soil brings some things to the game. The farmer provides the rest with fertilizers and water. With hydroponics, the farmer supplies all the nutrients but does so in a controlled environment where plants can really thrive.
    If you use coffee grounds as your growing medium, the coffee will bring some things to the game and you’ll provide the rest. Let me say though, that things are not quite that simple but you can get the idea. We could be arguing semantics if we said that using coffee grounds was hydroponic. It can be but if you mix your coffee grounds in with soil, or you pour the grounds over your garden, you’re still growing things organically.
    Now you can begin to see why I was a lanscape architect and turf expert for twenty years. Growing plants is just plain fun.

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  2. I agree that it can be a great additive. But remember that coffee grounds are acidic and will likely make your soil more acidic. This is great if you are growing blueberries or other acid living plants, but it’s not great for all plants.
    Another benefit of adding coffee to outdoor plants is that worms like to eat it, which means good compost around your plant. When you put a potted plant outside in the dirt, worms can enter the drainage holes and crawl around in the dirt inside the pot. The coffee will give them something to munch on.
    This is the second time that I have been asked this question recently. I’m not sure if it’s being pitched as a life hack or what, but I honestly can’t think of a reason to WANT to grow plants in all coffee – unless you have tons of used coffee grounds and no dirt. But coffee lacks the basic nutrients that a plant would need from soil, especially for any sustained period of time. So even if your seeds germinate I don’t think it would result in healthy plants that live for a long time.
    You would have to replenish missing nutrients with a fertilizer or plant food. So unless there’s a compelling reason to use the coffee grounds, why add more steps, more work, more time, more money… when you could just use soil?

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  3. Yes. You need to have the correct pH range for the plants you want to grow and furnish all the nutrients, including micronutrients.
    As a kid, I used to grow earthworms in the soil in a tub, and I fed them on coffee grounds. I always assumed that coffee grounds must have some nutrients or the earthworms would have died, but I don’t remember ever seeing an analysis.
    Jim

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  4. The only thing you can reliably grow in coffee grounds is mushrooms. Plants require more nutrient than coffee grounds can ever provide and by trying to grow exclusively in them, you will have fungal and disease problems later on as the coffee grounds start to decompose. There is the pH issue to consider but it is negligible, the real issue is the amount of fertilizer you would have to use just to make coffee-soil comparable to normal soil. I recommend that you use the grounds as a top dressing and in your compost bin instead.

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  5. Might be an interesting bit of garden research. I’m sure that a complete fertilizer in liquid form would be necessary, although used coffee grounds have a small amount of most necessary nutrients. Coarse grounds would be the best choice for your experiment.

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  6. Coffee grounds are too acidic for almost all plants and too fast-draining for about half of them. They make a lousy growing medium. Why bother, why torture the plants?

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  7. No , but coffee grounds do contain nutrients for plants . Add coffee grounds to your compost pile, or till them into your garden soil . Coffee can’t replace soil , but it makes a good additive. On the other hand, if you are interested in growing your own mushrooms, coffee grounds work great.
    Can we use coffee ground as plant soil? – Quora
    Can we use coffee ground as plant soil?

    Eight O’Clock

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  8. Fungi probably, but the grounds will need a thorough going over by soil microorganisms before you consider growing something in them. Personally I would be mixing it up, well and truly. As in, lay the coffee grounds on the soil, cover with leaves and let nature do its thing. Then use the coffee grounds.

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  9. They make a great potting starter although long term you need to mix cow manure / chicken manure and grass cuttings to make a complete soil. Or you can just use straight up coffee grounds and provide a feed like a compost tea or conventional fertilizer. When you bring the plant to flower and yield its fruit you will need to give guano and molasses or a phosphate and potassium feed with some carbs.

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  10. Coffee grounds are used as medium for fungi like mushrooms . It has a lot of uses when mixed with other materials. For maximum benefits to your plants you must add it or incorporate it with your soil because all things you add to your soil has chemical interactions to produce quality soil which will be beneficial to the plant.
    Research studies on using coffee ground as s medium for some species of mushrooms has shown positive results. But for other plants like vegetables and fruits you need to incorporate it with other types of soil to make it more beneficial to the plants.

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