Can Starbucks make your drink extra hot?

Can Starbucks make your drink extra hot?

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0 thoughts on “Can Starbucks make your drink extra hot?”

  1. They can and do. I ask for my latte extra hot, specifying 180 degrees. You don’t want it so hot that it scalds the milk — and burns your mouth. I use coconut milk, but the same principle applies. I find that at 180 degrees, my latte stays hot long enough for me to savor it for a half hour or so. Although, when I get home I usually pop it into the microwave to heat it up and get the coconut milk to foam up again (I like lots of foam).
    As for drip coffee, good luck. It’s whatever’s in the brewing machine. And, if you go to a kiosk or Starbucks in a grocery store and they’ve got the drip coffee in thermos containers, that’s not going to be hot enough. I know this for a fact, since my spouse drinks the dark brew and he won’t get it at one of those places.

    Can Starbucks make your drink extra hot?

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  2. They can, but try to avoid it. Milk irreversibly degrades after 154 degrees F. Milk served at 140 degrees F will create a much sweeter drink with better texture. Just try and drink it as soon as it’s served. I honestly don’t believe you can have a nice, extra hot drink.

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  3. If you’re ordering a drink made with the hot water tap (hot coffee, hot tea, & Americanos), then no. That water came straight out the fire pits of hell and it’s as hot as it’ll ever be. (190 F) No, we cannot steam it. Why? Keep reading.
    As for hot lattes and other beverages that already spend a moment under a steam wand, the default is 160 F, and can be ordered extra hot, but will only go to 170 F or 175 F if the barista is being nice or has no feeling in their hands left. Technically, the protocol is that we can’t do anything hotter due to safety regulations.
    “But I can drink that without getting burned!” You say, annoyed that your drink isn’t straight out of the lava flow.
    Allow me to clarify. Those safety regulations are for the workers making your drink. Your mouth might somehow be able to handle those crazy temperatures, but the few federal and state safety boards have bestowed wisdom and grace upon the barely-above-minimum-wage-workers that they don’t have to heat your drink to above 170 F in order to provide a safer environment for the 18 year old making your drink who has their entire future ahead of them and a hovering mom who has no problem jumping on a lawsuit train for their child.
    Yet another quality factor is that if you heat dairy milk beyond the 160 F, it begins to scald and will decrease the quality of the taste of your drink. Push it past 175 and you might as well be drinking burnt milk. It tastes gross, and you’re probably just going to come back and whine about how burned it tastes.
    By the way, if you say it doesn’t taste burnt, then your dead taste buds want their lives back.

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