Can a coffee maker be cleaned with bleach? If so, how?

Can a coffee maker be cleaned with bleach? If so, how?

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0 thoughts on “Can a coffee maker be cleaned with bleach? If so, how?”

  1. I would not recommend bleach while using coffee makers. The coffee maker’s certain parts like brewers are sensitive and the blech might damage it both internally and externally. Using a normal detergent of a dishwasher liquid with a gentle scrubber is the best element for cleaning a coffee maker

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  2. I would not use bleach in a coffee maker. It is potentially toxic even in small quantities and could cause issues with residue. I used to use it with my beer brewing equipment and it was a challenge to remove residue even with VERY minor concentrations. I did much better with commercial cleaners/sanitizers. Same here. I would use either commercial cleaner and descaler, of which there are lots of options, or a blend of 50/50 water and white vinegar or 50/50 water and lemon juice. I would do it 2–3x then finish off with 1–2 runs using just clean, cold water. That should more than address any issues you are having or trying to avoid.

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  3. Absolutely not it will forever ruin the taste of future coffee. White vinegar followed by clear water will help a bunch. There are also commercial things to use.

    Can a coffee maker be cleaned with bleach? If so, how?

    Can a coffee maker be cleaned with bleach? If so, how?

    Can a coffee maker be cleaned with bleach? If so, how?

    Can a coffee maker be cleaned with bleach? If so, how?

    Urnex Coffee Maker and Espresso Machine Cleaner Cleancaf Powder – 3 Packets – Safe On Keurig Delonghi Nespresso Ninja Hamilton Beach Mr Coffee
    $8.98 at Amazon.

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  4. Noooo… This is going to damage the seals in the unit.
    If you need to run through something, try some commercial white vinegar, or decalcifying agents. There is no need to add bleach.

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  5. I once noticed how nasty my coffee maker had gotten, and I partially disassembled it and soaked it in a solution of bleach. Then I washed it with dish detergent to get the bleach off of it, and then when I reassembled it, I ran some white vinegar through it. When I got done, it was fine, but I doubt many people would go to this much trouble, given what a new one would cost.

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  6. Ummm you don’t clean your machine with bleach. For a few reasons.
    Health reasons – you may not get all of it out of the machine and its now in your coffee
    You may use too much bleach unknowingly and you or someone else may get sick severely or worse
    The machine is not designed to use bleach

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  7. It’s not a good idea to clean a coffee maker with bleach. Bleach could actually damage your coffee maker. It is very corrosive and harsh.
    If you plan on using it anyways, only add about 2 tablespoons of bleach to your water. Then run about 4 pots of just water to make sure you remove any left over bleach.

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  8. As long as the bleach does not have scents, detergents, or other laundry stuff in it you should be fine. Bleach decomposes and evaporates in open air. Run it through without heat, rinse thoroughly, and let stand for an hour or two to chase vapors.

    Victor Allen’s

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  9. Please don’t use bleach! To clean out a coffee maker run solution of 1/2 water and 1/2 white vinegar thru the longest cycle and the rinse 3 times with plain water to remove any vinegar smell. The vinegar removes built up oils from the coffee and any hard water residue. This works just fine for regular drip coffee makers and Keurig machines. It’s cheap and easy, if a bit time consuming.

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  10. I don’t think it’s a good idea. The tube that carries the water is very small, it’d be easy for a residue of bleach to remain.
    Use vinegar! While it’s not as strong as bleach, it should be strong enough to clean most coffee makers. It’s a good idea to do it twice, if you are still seeing gunk coming out go for a third time. It might take longer, but it’s completely non-toxic & worry free.

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  11. I would say you don’t, you really don’t want to end up with any traces of bleach in a coffee brewing device, A) for potential health reasons, B) Will probably leave trace notes of bleach in your next coffee.
    If you really need to deep clean your coffee maker there are coffee specific non-toxic descalers and cleaners on the market, most can usually be found from coffee roasting companies or even on Amazon.

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  12. It might come across as trite, but refer to your brewer’s maker. In the manual for your machine, it should suggest what you can use. Most I’ve come across suggest mild detergent (dish soap / washing-up liquid).
    The other thing to consider is the parts. Which parts of a machine can be cleaned with any solvent/soap/bleach? I think using dilute bleach in a vacuum flask is probably going to be less problematic than running straight bleach through your brewer like a kind of toxic rinse cycle 🙂 Some plastics don’t like to be bleached at all, and some metals will tarnish. A lot of led/lcd screens might discolour or grow cloudy.
    Chlorine bleach also leaves a terrible odour, which can persist for bloody ages.
    From my personal experience, I’ve found washing any appropriate pieces (filter basket, flask, reservoir…) in washing up liquid works just fine. If you do it regularly, and don’t let grounds or brew sit around for ages, you shouldn’t need to bleach anything. However, when I worked as a barista, we kept a bucket of very dilute bleach water handy to dip bar towels in to keep our surfaces somewhat sanitary. This didn’t seem to cause any noticeable discolouration on pots or brew baskets. But it also wasn’t intended to bleach away stains. We washed everything regularly with washing up liquid or in the dishwasher 🙂
    Also, I sometimes soak my ceramic and glass pour-over funnels in bleach water to remove stains, then rinse with oceans of hot water. But these aren’t plastic or metallic, nor do they have any moveable parts or fit into a bigger machine.

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  13. Personally I wouldn’t and if you feel it’s infected throw it out and get a new one,for cleaning and descaleing (hard water deposits) use white cider vinegar a couple times then run fresh water to get the vinegar taste out.

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  14. OMG do not use bleach on anything other than glass that you can get to with a sponge and soap afterward. Why would you want to you bleach on something like this anyway. That stink takes for ever to go away and will definitely corrupt your coffee flavor even after it is safe to drink from.

    Peet’s

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  15. I have heard equal parts vinegar and water run through a cycle will help clean out a coffeemaker. I don’t drink coffee but I have served many relatives. My mother was a purist.

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